House of Commons Hansard #84 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was unemployed.

Topics

.Agriculture and Agri-food
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I think the Bloc Québécois does not want to understand. Of course, it is only interested in separating Quebec. We are a country, and we do not want to have different standards from one province to another. Naturally, we have to find compromises. We will accept organic products from Quebec until 2011, when the new regulations take effect. That is what happens in a country. That country is Canada. It is not just Quebec.

2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, on the issue of bilingualism at the Olympics, the alarm was sounded by francophone communities over one year ago, but the minister did not act. We have asked questions in the House and invited the minister to appear before the committee, but he did not act. We have offered solutions, but he did not act. The Standing Committee on Official Languages took him to task, but he did not act. Finally, today, a mere five months before the games, he improvised and announced additional funding.

Does he not realize that funds are not enough? Real political will is also necessary, but that might be too much to ask of him.

2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary for Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, let me be very clear. The 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games will be bilingual and will respect both official languages. In fact, our government recently provided VANOC with $7.7 million in additional funding for translation services at the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games. They will be a great success in both official languages. All Canadians will be included. This will be true of the opening and closing ceremonies, the cultural Olympiad and the Olympic torch relay. We will do our best—

2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Honoré-Mercier.

2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, they are so fond of improvising, let us talk about music.

The Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages does not seem to be a fan of jazz, folk, world, electroacoustic or even contemporary music. He surreptitiously made cuts to programs supporting such music.

These new cuts to culture are being denounced across the country by musicians like Glenn Milchem from Blue Rodeo, as well as by thousands of Canadians from coast to coast who have signed a petition in less than 48 hours. We are talking about thousands of people.

Why does the minister, on the one hand, claim to want to support artists and, on the other hand—

2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. parliamentary secretary.

2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, earlier this year, our Minister of Canadian Heritage announced a $138 million investment into the Canadian music fund over this and the next four years. That is a five-year commitment.

What are people saying about this commitment to Canadian music? Heather Ostertag, the president and CEO of FACTOR, said:

We are fortunate to have strong leadership and vision from our current government, which recognizes the importance of supporting sustainable business models and believes in the cultural component....

That is what we are hearing. That is what we are doing. We are standing behind Canadian music.

Fisheries and oceans
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, the sustainability of our fishing stocks and the sovereignty of this country are at risk. Instead of delivering on the promise of custodial management by Canada outside 200 miles, recent changes to the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization convention could allow foreign nations to patrol and control what happens inside our 200 mile limit.

For all of the grandstanding we have seen from the government over the Arctic, why have we heard nothing from it about Atlantic fishing sovereignty?

Fisheries and oceans
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, I can assure the hon. member that this government has strengthened Canadian sovereignty and we want to thank the former fisheries minister for NAFO now having teeth. This convention will spell out clearly that Canada has 100% jurisdiction over Canadian waters.

Fisheries and oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, Premier Williams of Newfoundland and Labrador wrote the Prime Minister saying that this is “an issue that threatens our very sovereignty as a nation”.

We have former deputy ministers of fisheries, two former directors responsible for the international file and an associate deputy minister saying that this is a backward step for Newfoundland and Labrador and should be rejected.

Will the government stand up for our sovereignty, refuse to ratify this agreement and file an objection to these changes at NAFO?

Fisheries and oceans
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, for the hon. member and the House, I would like to quote the fisheries minister in Newfoundland, on July 6, 2009, who said:

The fact that Canada would have to support a NAFO measure and then request its application in the (200-mile limit) seems to provide the necessary safeguard against any unintended consequence of the amended convention.

In another letter, the fisheries minister states, ”This along with securing the Canadian shares of NAFO-managed stocks makes an acceptable package”.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Michael Chong Wellington—Halton Hills, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government has made unprecedented investments in infrastructure across this country in big cities, small towns, urban areas and rural areas. Our economic action plan is getting projects moving and Canadians back to work.

The city of Toronto is a rising global centre, the country's most rapidly growing region and a critical driver of the Canadian economy. Would the Minister of Transport tell the House of our recent investment in Canada's largest city?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I was very pleased to make an important announcement with the Minister of Finance and my favourite mayor of a city of more than 2.5 million people, David Miller, in the city of Toronto for more than $600 million to support 500 projects. It will create jobs, hope and opportunity in Canada's largest city. It will lead to better public transit, cleaner water and better roads and bridges.

Working together with Toronto, we are getting the job done.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

September 18th, 2009 / 11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, in June, the Minister of Foreign Affairs answered my question and said, “there is no existing Alaska-Yukon boundary dispute”.

This week, the Prime Minister said the exact opposite. He said, “The Beaufort Sea has been the subject of a territorial dispute...for some time”.

Meanwhile, Americans offer petroleum opportunities in Canada's sovereign waters. Will the minister continue to contradict the Prime Minister and, more important, when will he stand up for Canada and do something about the Beaufort Sea dispute that he says does not even exist?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, in terms of Canada-U.S. relations, I want to reassure members of the House that these relations are excellent and they are working extremely well. The best evidence of that is the Prime Minister and the president's meeting earlier this week.

On that specific issue, the Minister of State, as well as myself have acknowledged the importance of continuing our work together in the Arctic and of being able to work on these issues that are obstacles. We will work together in the spirit of co-operation and manage the issues in the best interests of everyone.

However, I will be very clear on this: we will defend our sovereignty.