House of Commons Hansard #82 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was security.

Topics

Workplace Safety
Oral Questions

October 19th, 2010 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, one year ago today, Mr. Peter Kennedy was killed when a Parliament Hill boiler exploded. It is my understanding that later today, charges will be laid against Mr. Kennedy's employer, the federal government, citing its failure to protect the health and safety of its workers.

In the year since Mr. Kennedy's death, what concrete actions has the government taken to protect its workers?

It is imperative that Peter Kennedy did not die in vain. When will the government finally take a leadership role in setting the national standard for making workplaces safe?

Workplace Safety
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Halton
Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I too would like to acknowledge and extend my sympathy not only to the family of Mr. Kennedy, but to all Canadian families and friends who have lost loved ones on the job, especially since no words can take away the sorrow that they feel.

It is true that my officials have conducted a thorough investigation of the matter to which the member referred, and charges have been laid against Public Works and Government Services Canada for health and safety violations under the Canada Labour Code. That is because we are committed to safe and healthy workplaces. We will continue our efforts to ensure that is the case.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Tilly O'Neill-Gordon Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, today at the human resources committee we heard from witnesses on the eliminating entitlements for prisoners bill. Sharon Rosenfeldt from Victims of Violence, whose own son was murdered by Clifford Olson, and Kevin Gaudet from the Canadian Taxpayers Federation urged all parties to pass this bill quickly.

Could the minister tell the House what she is hearing from Canadians across this country about our Conservative government's plans to take old age security benefits away from prisoners?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, the response from Canadians in support of our Bill C-31 has been overwhelmingly positive. Canadians agree with our government. They really believe that it would be grossly unfair for taxpayers to continue to fund pensions for convicted criminals when those criminals are already being provided room and board by taxpayers.

Canadians want this bill passed. I urge the opposition to pass it quickly because it is the right, fair and reasonable thing to do.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, nursing students, prospective teachers, hockey coaches and thousands of other law-abiding Canadians are all being adversely affected by the delay in receiving the results of their criminal background checks. The minister was made aware of this months ago. He says he is aware, but he has done nothing to ensure an efficient security clearance process.

Why is the minister putting so many Canadians and Canadian companies at risk?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, there is always a very delicate balance between public safety and the interests of individuals. That member would be the first one on his feet to complain if someone had slipped between the cracks.

I recognize that the RCMP and other agencies have a very difficult job to do in that respect. I can explain to the member why it may seem like an inappropriate period of time, but I can assure him that those agencies are working as quickly as possible to deal with each and every request.

Health
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, chronically ill Canadians are waiting months to get and renew permits for access to medical marijuana. Patients are being cut off from their legally prescribed medication because of an under-resourced and overly bureaucratic application process. People do not want to break the law to access and use their legally prescribed drugs.

Will the minister stop treating patients like criminals and commit the necessary resources to end these dangerously long processing times?

Health
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we are aware of the backlog and are putting additional resources toward addressing it. My department has installed procedures that will improve the efficiency of the review and authorization process and to respond in a timely manner. Reform of this program will balance public safety and access to patient needs.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Yves Lessard Chambly—Borduas, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government refused to give the royal recommendation to the Bloc Québécois' Bill C-395, which would make workers who are victims of labour disputes eligible for employment insurance benefits. What is most absurd is that this government is more generous to prisoners, because the period of incarceration is excluded from the benefit calculation, while the lockout period is not.

How can this government abandon locked-out workers like the ones in Lebel-sur-Quévillon?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, it is important to understand the employment insurance system. Two categories of people pay into the plan: employees and employers. Both pay for the insurance when there is a loss of employment that is not the employees' fault. When there is a work stoppage, whether it is a strike or a lockout, it is very important that the system remain neutral.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Zheng Silin, Chairman of the China-Canada Legislative Association of the National People's Congress, People's Republic of China.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would also like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of Mrs. Betty Fox and Mr. Rolly Fox, parents of Terry Fox.

Thirty years ago, their son ran across Canada for 143 days, covering a distance of 5,373 kilometres, to raise money for cancer research.

Since 1981, Mrs. Fox has worked tirelessly with the Terry Fox Foundation and the Terry Fox Research Institute to raise awareness of cancer and cancer research.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Srebrenica Remembrance Day
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, there has been consultation among the parties and if you seek it you will find there is unanimous consent to adopt the following motion:

That, in the opinion of the House, the day of July 11 should be recognized as Srebrenica Remembrance Day in memorial of the Srebrenica Massacre of July 1995, in which more than 7,000 Bosniak men and boys were executed, declared an act of genocide by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Court of Justice, and 25,000 others were forcibly removed from their homes by Bosnian Serb forces.