House of Commons Hansard #82 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was security.

Topics

Child and Spousal Support
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, I hope the minister realizes that the facts state that these single parents need these court-ordered payments to survive and pay their bills.

The Department of National Defence has reported late payments in 3,600 cases. Health Canada and Veterans Affairs have been late in over 38% of their garnishee cases.

When people are late for one payment, it can be an accident. When people are late for dozens, or sometimes thousands in this case, there is only one expression: they are deadbeats.

Why are kids and single parents not a priority for the government?

Child and Spousal Support
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day President of the Treasury Board and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, we can talk at length about a variety of programs that show the importance we place on families, single parents and care for children, even as far as having daycare available on site in many of our locations. There is a long list of clear demonstrations of how we care about these situations.

As I have indicated for the member, there have been some cases brought to our attention where it has been difficult to do the follow-up. However, our instruction to officials has been clear: be aggressive on this, close the gap in terms of the time and get these situations dealt with.

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are rightly concerned when they hear Conservatives talk about health care funding because one particular Conservative has said that “each province should raise its own revenue for health care”, and we should “replace Canada health and social transfer...with tax points”.

I am not referring to the leadership candidate from Beauce. I am quoting the current Prime Minister.

The end of cash transfers would prevent enforcement of the Canada Health Act and put an end to medicare.

Could the Minister of Health admit that this is in fact the government's true agenda?

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, we respect the Canada Health Act and our government is committed to the universal public health care system. We will continue to work with the provinces and our territorial partners to ensure they have the necessary resources to deliver health care to Canadians.

We have also increased the transfers to provinces and territories by 6% per year to an all-time high of $25.4 billion this year so that they can continue to meet the health care needs of their residents.

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the leadership candidate and hon. member for Beauce said federal health transfers have to be abolished because they violate the Constitution.

He also said that the Conservative Party espouses that position. The federal government will be renegotiating its transfer agreement with the provinces very soon.

My question is the following: can the government assure Canadians today that it will uphold health transfers in order to protect the universality and public nature of health care services in Canada?

Health
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, as we have said repeatedly, unlike the previous Liberal government, we will not cut transfer payments to other levels of government as part of our efforts to balance the budget and we will respect provincial jurisdictions.

International Trade
Oral Questions

October 19th, 2010 / 2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Dona Cadman Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada is a trading nation. As we continue to recover from the global recession, Canadian businesses and workers seek new and open markets to export their products.

Would the Minister of International Trade please update the House on the efforts our government is taking to diversify trading opportunities for Canadian businesses and workers?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, our government is focused on economic recovery and delivering jobs for Canadians. That is why this week we launched the fifth round of negotiations for a free trade deal with the European Union. Two-thirds of our economy is trade-based. That is one of the reasons that Canada has been successful in weathering the economic storm and posting the strongest economic growth of any major developed economy, any of the G7 countries.

We are focused on continuing that with trade negotiations under way with close to 50 countries right now, 8 deals already delivered and the 3 deals that the Liberals delivered in 13 years, we are improving them now and making them even better.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the renovation of the West Block is turning into a multi-million dollar fiasco: RCMP investigations, illegal lobbying, kick-backs and corruption. That is not good enough for one of our nation's finest heritage buildings.

Will the Minister of Public Works follow today's recommendation of the government operations committee and impose immediately an absolute moratorium on all contracting associated with the Parliament Buildings until our committee can determine that there will be no more corruption or influence peddling associated with the renovations of this building?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the member's motions and I can assure him that if any wrongdoing with any individual contractors are found they will face prosecution to the full extent of the law, including under the Federal Accountability Act, and we will ensure that taxpayer money will be recouped.

However, in terms of the specific contract to which he has referred, the government has no contractual relationship with this company. It is in fact a dispute between two private entities.

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, illegal lobbying, nepotism, favouritism, collusion, partisan appointments and shady financing—those words mean nothing to them.

It turns out that the very consultant hired by the federal government to smooth out disagreements in the project donated money to a Conservative fundraiser. Howie Clavier says that he did nothing wrong by paying $500 to attend the fundraiser put on by a contractor. He says that he saw it as a good opportunity to network with people involved in the West Block project.

However, some are questioning whether an impartial mediator and facilitator should be mixing government business with party politics. What does the government think?

Government Contracts
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, this government's first order of business was to bring in the Federal Accountability Act. It eliminated good money from politics, no more union contributions and no more corporate contributions of any kind. We eliminated all individuals from donating big money to politics. That has been good for our democracy and it has been good for Canada.

Scientific and Technology
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Cardin Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, federal scientists decided to create their own website in order to break the government's gag order. They are criticizing the government's attacks on scientific research integrity. They are particularly critical of the elimination of the mandatory long form census and cuts in the field of climate science.

Are scientists justified in criticizing the Conservatives' preference for basing decisions on their own ideology instead of on scientific facts?

Scientific and Technology
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day President of the Treasury Board and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, not at all. In fact, we have no new measures to prevent scientists and other public officials from expressing their opinions. We will maintain our policy that the minister who is responsible for a file will respond, but scientists can also discuss things according to the government's policy, and there are no restrictions on that. We will not be changing the existing policy.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, for four years, Canada tried to water down the Cartagena protocol on biosafety, then refused to ratify it. On Saturday, in Nagoya, a new protocol became a definitive treaty. This new protocol provides rules and procedures governing GMO producers' liability and redress for damage to ecosystems.

Does Canada plan to sign and ratify the new protocol or will it remain completely uncompromising as it did with the Cartagena protocol?