House of Commons Hansard #78 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was vehicles.

Topics

Air Canada
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Desnoyers Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, Air Canada machinists are worried. The company wants to transfer the work of its machinists to a company called Aveos, yet Aveos is talking about moving some of its operations to El Salvador.

The Leader of the Government spoke about ongoing discussions with the companies involved. However, the Air Canada Public Participation Act is clear and requires that Air Canada maintain operational and overhaul centres in Montreal, Mississauga, and Winnipeg. Will the government enforce this?

Air Canada
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Of course, Mr. Speaker, all the companies that are affected by that particular piece of legislation are expected to adhere to the law. I have no proposals that have crossed my desk that suggest otherwise.

All those companies understand their obligations.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Carol Hughes Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, ON

Mr. Speaker, with Thanksgiving just days away, communities such as Grassy Narrows First Nation are worried that the fish they are eating are still contaminated with mercury.

The problem is made even worse by clear-cutting in the region, which can raise mercury levels in rivers and fish, and now Weyerhaeuser is not respecting Grassy Narrows' moratorium on logging.

Health Canada has ignored repeated calls to test the fish in the English River system for these dangerous pollutants.

Can the minister reassure people that there is no chance that their Thanksgiving dinners are coming with a side order of mercury? Why will the government not act to protect the people of Grassy Narrows?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, we are all concerned about the plight of first nations, particularly in Grassy Narrows, which has experienced a good number of challenges. We remain committed to work with the community involved and to ensure that the government can provide the support they need.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

October 6th, 2010 / 3 p.m.

Conservative

Lois Brown Newmarket—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada has taken the lead on the world stage when it comes to helping those less fortunate.

At the MDG summit in New York, the Prime Minister outlined the plans for our maternal health initiative.

As our Prime Minister said:

[I]t will be critical that our words...ultimately translate into simple realities like food on the table, improved health and a better life for children around the world.

Can the Minister of International Cooperation give us an update on what she is doing to make good on the Prime Minister's promise?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, too many children's lives throughout the developing world are being lost to diseases that can be prevented, and Canada is taking real action to save lives in developing countries.

At the UN, the Prime Minister announced a 20% increase in Canada's support for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Today I am pleased to announce Canada's increased contribution to the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization of $50 million over five years. This will strengthen the immunization systems in developing countries and save lives of children, an important component of Canada's G8 initiative to save the lives of mothers, newborns, and children.

Employment
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is corporate welfare for profitable Vale while families are losing their homes as manufacturing plants in southwestern Ontario continue to close, the Bick's plant in Dunnville being the most recent example. Communities such as Hamilton, Chatham, Windsor and Dunnville need to know that their government cares about their future.

Where is the government's plan to bring highly paid, full-time jobs back to these communities?

Employment
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, there is a plan. It is called the economic action plan. It is called everything that we do to focus on jobs and recovery and full-time jobs in our manufacturing sector and indeed in all sectors. That is why we are focusing on those issues. That is why we are reducing taxes for businesses, small and large, so they can grow jobs in our communities.

Why is the hon. member part of a party that wants to raise taxes on people who create jobs in our communities? Why?

International Trade
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, it has been 10 years since the people of Ontario said good riddance to the notorious Adams Mine garbage dump, but now we learn that an American, Vito Gallo, is trying to hit up the Canadian taxpayer for $355 million through a NAFTA challenge.

The funny thing is that nobody has ever heard of this guy before. He invested zero dollars in the site and he has never bid on any garbage contract, but his partners have given generously to the Conservative Party, and he quotes two cabinet ministers in his statement of claim against the Canadian people.

The question is, is the fix in? Will the government stand up for Canada or roll over for Vito Gallo and his buddies?

International Trade
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, our government has a very proud record of standing up for Canada and for Canadian workers throughout by taking advantage of the provisions that exist in our North American Free Trade Agreement. If the hon. member had been following it, he would have seen a number of very recent successes where Canada has won its cases in that forum. We continue to be successful in that forum.

We will continue to stand up for Canadian workers, for policies that are sound, and for jobs and prosperity in Canada as a result of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Privacy
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Freeman Châteauguay—Saint-Constant, QC

Mr. Speaker, in her annual report to Parliament, the Privacy Commissioner criticized the Conservative government's lack of concern over protecting personal information. According to her findings, not one of the five departments and agencies audited adequately assesses the risks associated with using wireless communication devices. She also noted that 90% of the departments had not properly wiped their computers’ hard drives before donating the computers to schools.

Does the government realize that protecting personal information is not optional?

Privacy
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Okanagan—Coquihalla
B.C.

Conservative

Stockwell Day President of the Treasury Board and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, the Privacy Commissioner has raised these concerns, and we agree with her. We were already aware of certain situations and have taken measures to protect the devices. We will follow her suggestions because we agree with her.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of Dr. Andrew Molozzi, a principal designer and so one of the pioneers of Canada's original space program, the Alouette satellite program.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Health
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to table today two government responses to the Standing Committee on Health entitled “Promoting Innovative Solutions to Health Human Resources Challenges” and “The Way Forward: Addressing the Elevated Rates of Tuberculosis Infection in on Reserve First Nations and Inuit Communities”.

I would also like to extend my appreciation to the health committee for these two important reports.