House of Commons Hansard #108 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was prison.

Topics

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

December 1st, 2010 / 2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, we know that the decision to stop Taseko's Prosperity mine involved five cabinet ministers. Each must answer for the cabinet leak that left Taseko's shares plunging and insiders getting rich.

I ask the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, when did she sign off on the Taseko mine rejection? Who in her office knew about the decision? Has her office handed over any and all information about the deal to the RCMP and the PCO?

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, there the member for Ajax—Pickering goes again, speculating, making wild accusations.

It was only on October 8 that he had to stand in his place and apologize and retract statements on other smears that he has made. We will await those similar apologies in the future.

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Ajax—Pickering, ON

Mr. Speaker, after seven weeks of doing nothing, the government needs to start providing answers. It should be sorry to the investors who lost their shirts and are getting those kinds of answers from the government.

I am directing these questions to specific ministers. Are they capable or even allowed to answer the questions? Do they need the protection of a human cabinet shield, or will they stand in their place and provide answers?

I ask the Minister of Indian Affairs, when did he sign off on the Taseko mine rejection? Who in his office knew about the decision? Has his office handed over any and all information to the RCMP and the PCO?

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, if the member opposite has any information on this issue that he would like to place before the House after question period, we certainly would be prepared to agree to that. If the member opposite wants to expand on his wild speculations, let him have the intellectual honesty and the courage of his convictions to step outside and make any accusations he would like to make.

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, let me give this a try in French.

We know that the cabinet decision to block Taseko Mines' Prosperity project was made via a walk around, which means that four ministers had to sign off on it for it to be considered a cabinet decision. The Taseko affair is within the purview of the following five departments: Environment, Natural Resources, Indian and Northern Affairs, Fisheries and Oceans and Finance. My question is for the Minister of Natural Resources.

When did he sign off on rejecting the project? Who in his office knew about it? Did his office provide information about this matter to the RCMP and the Privy Council? Is he brave enough to stand?

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is all speculation on the part of the Liberal Party. If the member for Bourassa has any real information, he should place it before the House after question period.

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, will the Minister of Finance try to hide behind the government House leader too? He usually manages to speak for himself. I would like him to answer the questions.

When did he sign off on rejecting the project? Who in his office knew about the decision? Most importantly, did he get information from his department about this matter? Did his office provide information about this matter to the RCMP and the Privy Council Office? This is not complicated.

Taseko Mines Limited
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, if the member has specific information to back up this speculation, I would encourage him to place it before the House after question period. If he has specific accusations, he should raise them in the House after question period.

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, about 100 Quebec artists came to Parliament Hill, calling for protection of their copyright. The Conservative government, as insensitive as ever to Quebec's concerns, rejected their basic demands with respect to digital levies.

A Conservative organizer in northern Montreal, the former riding president in Montcalm, even wrote on his Facebook page, and I quote, “I am sick of artists...take your demands and shove them.” That is the end of the Conservative quote.

Is that not the very essence of the Conservative government's position?

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, our government's policy on this issue is in Bill C-32. We are also in talks with the Government of Quebec. In fact, I had a meeting with Ms. St-Pierre this week. Yesterday, I spoke with the Union des artistes and I stressed to them that this bill addresses the interests of both consumers and artists.

This is what the Canadian Film and Television Production Association had to say: “We applaud this Conservative government's copyright reforms.”

This is a balanced, responsible bill that is in the best interests of all Canadians.

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, this bill is unbalanced and irresponsible. Yesterday the artists said so themselves.

Among this delegation of artists was Claude Robinson, who fought a 15-year battle to have the courts recognize his copyright. He is a real symbol for copyright in Quebec. His presence reminded us that Bill C-32 transforms all creators into thousands of Claude Robinsons who will be left on their own to fight for their intellectual property rights and for fair compensation.

Is it not time to make significant changes to Bill C-32 to establish a fair balance between distributors and creators?

Copyright
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, we say that the balance exists already in Bill C-32. We balanced the rights and obligations of the government to protect those in the creative economy and also those of consumers.

We protect the rights of creators. We make piracy illegal in Canada. We also impose the international WIPO treaties. We also have limited fair dealing in this bill. We also protect the rights of creators to impose technological protection measures to protect what it is that they are creating.

We also stand up for consumers by having a notice and notice regime. We stand up for consumers by saying no to a massive new tax on iPods, cellphones, BlackBerrys and laptops.

We believe in balance and what is in the best interests of consumers and creators.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, regarding the infrastructure program, the Government of Quebec, the National Assembly, the Union des municipalités du Québec and the Fédération québécoise des municipalités oppose piecemeal solutions. They are asking that the March 31, 2011, deadline be extended for all infrastructure projects because 353 projects are in danger. The municipalities could be stuck with an additional bill for over $200 million.

The minister keeps repeating that there will be an announcement soon. Will the government stop fueling the uncertainty and push back the March 31, 2011, deadline?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, of course we have been listening to all of the provinces.

About three weeks ago, we finally received the data from Quebec that gave us an analysis on a project-by-project basis of the status of all those projects in Quebec. That information is essential as we do the analysis of what we need to do to look after the needs of the proponents.

The Prime Minister has already said today that not only are we going to be fair and reasonable but we are going to be flexible. We hope to have an announcement very soon.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Guy André Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, several municipalities in Quebec could lose all of their funding because it will be impossible to complete all work before the deadline. In my riding, that is the case in the municipality of Sainte-Élisabeth, which will not be able to complete a major paving project.

Will the government finally listen to the Quebec municipalities and push back the March 31, 2011, deadline, as called for by the municipality of Sainte-Élisabeth in particular?