House of Commons Hansard #115 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was years.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec has been affected by disastrous conditions this week and I would like the government to recognize that shoreline erosion is a serious problem, and that it is aggravated by climate change.

The federal government must not only be present in times of emergencies but it must also develop preventive measures. This is a very important issue for the people of the region, and the Prime Minister would be aware of that had he not refused to answer reporters' questions during his last visit.

How does the Prime Minister plan to work with Quebec to address the problems caused by shoreline erosion?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, that is already happening. Environment Canada, through partnership and funding, has worked with the Ouranos consortium to assess the bank erosion problem on the lower St. Lawrence River. The work is in progress on the erosion problem and it includes the whole lower St. Lawrence River.

In terms of the commissioner's report, we agree with the recommendations and are developing a national adaptation strategy.

Copyright
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Peter Braid Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians deserve effective copyright laws to protect jobs and ensure our economy remains strong. Our government's copyright reform is widely supported by creators, consumers and the businesses that drive Canada's economy. On Wednesday, our committee heard from another prominent Canadian who supports copyright reform, the former Liberal deputy prime minister, John Manley.

Could the parliamentary secretary please inform the House what the former deputy prime minister told our committee?

Copyright
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Peterborough
Ontario

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Kitchener—Waterloo for all his hard work on this file, and he is right.

The former Liberal deputy prime minister and member for Ottawa South, John Manley, appeared at our committee and his message was clear when he said, “I strongly endorse Bill C-32. It brings Canada's copyright rules into the 21st century”. He said, “It gives creators a tool to control how their works are made available. The bill is needed to ensure that Canada does not become a haven for piracy”.

I hope the current member for Ottawa South realizes how much the former member knows about copyright and how much this bill could help creators in Canada.

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Industry has told the House he had to wait 30 days before giving his reasons for turning down the BHP hostile takeover of Potash Corporation. Then he assured the House he would act with alacrity.

The House has plenty of reasons not to take the minister at his word. He is already a week late. Is he still working on his lines, or will he tell Canadians today why he and the Prime Minister changed their minds and turned down this deal?

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the government did rule that this proposal was not of net benefit to Canada. BHP Billiton issued a statement on November 14, announcing that it had withdrawn its application for review under the Investment Canada Act. Once an application is withdrawn, there is no opportunity for the Minister of Industry to make a final decision and thus provide reasons.

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, it was not so long ago that the Prime Minister decided to ignore concerns about the acquisition of the Potash Corporation by BHP. At the time, his ignorance was amazing. He certainly learned a lot in a very short period of time.

Can the minister now explain what made the Prime Minister change his mind? Was it the NDP's solid economic logic or the Conservatives' political opportunism that made him change his mind?

Potash Industry
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, there was no change in mind. There was one decision in this case. The decision was made to the net benefit of the country of Canada and only the country of Canada. Canadians expect that from this government.

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

December 10th, 2010 / 11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, the court proceedings involving Tony Accurso's businesses have revealed that at least a half-dozen public servants from the Canada Revenue Agency are being suspected of corruption and complicity. Spokespersons for the agency refuse to tell the truth about the scope of the scandal affecting Revenue Canada.

Can the Minister of National Revenue confirm how many public servants are being investigated and how many construction businesses like Tony Accurso's profited from this system in which tax auditors were paid off?

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, the Canada Revenue Agency has a very strict code of ethics for all its employees. Any allegation of wrongdoing is taken very seriously and thoroughly investigated.

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, Tony's boat is for sale for $9 million. The problem is that taxpayers paid to have it built. We have also learned that a false invoicing scheme generated a lot of cash to cover the personal expenses of executives of Constructions Louisbourg and Simard-Beaudry Construction.

Now that it has caught Tony Accurso's businesses, will the Canada Revenue Agency go after those who benefited from all that cash?

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière
Québec

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and to the Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to protecting our tax base from anyone who tries to avoid paying their taxes.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, the report tabled this week by the commissioner of the environment was very damning and reads like a tragic comedy.

The ineptitude on the part of the government would make the Trailer Park Boys blush. It raises very important and serious questions. Where is our national emergency management plan? Where are the regional EMPs? Why has the government disregarded and rejected any investment in training?

The big question that people are scratching their heads over and want asked is this. Why has the government turned the responsibility for marine cleanup over to Ricky, Julian and Bubbles?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I thank the commissioner for his report.

We are committed to addressing environmental issues that are of concern to all Canadians. The fact is we are already taking action on preventing and preparing for environmental emergencies, strengthening our water monitoring systems and investing in climate change adaptation.

The government has accepted the commissioner's recommendations and actions are already under way.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, maybe we will hear from Ricky and Julian later.

It has gone from a tragic comedy to a fairytale now. It sort of reads like this: “Once upon a time Canadian governments cared about the environment and now they do not give a damn. The end”.

We saw what happened with the BP crisis and the catastrophe of that. There is no happily ever after on this. If those guys do not get it together, we are looking at dire consequences.

When will the government wake up and do something on this important issue?