House of Commons Hansard #115 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was years.

Topics

Haiti
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Don Valley East.

Tobacco Products
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Yasmin Ratansi Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, big tobacco lobbyists are freely roaming the halls of power, having undue influence over the Conservative government. After spending millions of dollars on the new and more effective warning labels for cigarettes, well-connected lobbyists like Perrin Beatty, a Mulroney cabinet minister, are convincing the Conservatives to scrap the labels.

Exactly when did big tobacco start determining public health policy in Canada?

Tobacco Products
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to standing up to big tobacco and curbing smoking, we have no lessons to take from the Liberals.

The news stories are simply wrong. Additional health warning labels are still under review, which I stated many times, and an announcement will be made soon. Our government is committed to preventing young people from starting smoking and helping Canadians quit smoking and addressing the pressing issue on contraband tobacco.

Tobacco Products
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

Yasmin Ratansi Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister can get big tobacco to work for her.

Regarding the new warnings on cigarette packaging, why did the minister tell her provincial counterparts that changes were off the table? Why did she lead the tobacco industry to believe that changes were off the table when now she is saying that changes are imminent?

Will the minister stop playing cheap political games with the health of Canadians and come clean with what her intentions are?

Tobacco Products
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I have passed on the information to my provincial and territorial colleagues that I was continuing to review the labels. I have never said to the provincial and territorial governments that it was off the table. That work is in progress and we are continuing to do that. We are also taking action on many fronts. For example, the Cracking Down on Tobacco Marketing Aimed at Youth Act, which recently came into force, will make it even harder for industry to entice young people to use tobacco products.

Let me speak about our record. We have passed the cracking down on tobacco act. We have also invested $15 million--

Tobacco Products
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I am afraid the hon. member's time has expired.

The hon. member for Joliette.

National Defence
Oral Questions

December 10th, 2010 / 11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, a May 2007 memo sent by the top military legal adviser, Brigadier General Kenneth Watkin, warns senior officers that the Canadian Forces could face criminal charges if prisoners were transferred to Afghan authorities while there was reason to believe that individuals had been or could be tortured.

Given that there have been proven cases of torture in Afghan prisons, will the government acknowledge that it new full well, as early as 2007, that Canada was violating its international obligations by continuing to transfer prisoners?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for his question.

The simple fact is all the Judge Advocate General was doing was giving prudent legal advice and guidance to senior leadership of the Canadian Forces. That is his job. There was a lot going on at the time. He was merely making sure that everyone understood their duties, which they have carried out. All members of the Canadian Forces at all levels have abided by their obligations nationally and internationally for the welfare of the Afghan people in keeping with their good reputation and the great work the Canadian Forces have done in the process.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, the legal opinion also says that the higher a person is in the military hierarchy, the greater their responsibility.

Will the Minister of National Defence, who is at the top of this hierarchy, acknowledge that by continuing to transfer prisoners to Afghan authorities, he failed in his ministerial responsibilities, contravened international conventions about torture and exposed military personnel to criminal charges, through no fault of their own?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, that is absolutely false. The Minister of National Defence, the Chief of the Defence Staff and everyone in the chain of command, adheres to their obligations under international law. We brought in an improved arrangement when the previous arrangement was found to be insufficient. The opposition members are trying to make a news story of something that is merely routine. It is the JAG advising members of their responsibilities and that is his job, and it is their job to abide by those responsibilities and that is what they have done.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, in Cancun, when the federal Minister of the Environment acknowledged that Quebec and the provinces had taken the lead in the fight against climate change, he tacitly acknowledged that he had not fulfilled his own responsibilities.

Will the government finally show some leadership, beginning with agreeing to extend the Kyoto protocol beyond 2012?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, our provinces and territories have demonstrated real leadership and will contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and we thank them for that. Quebec, for example, has done its part. In green energy we can be proud of what we have accomplished as a country. There is still a lot of work to be done, but together we will do the right thing for Canada, for the environment and for all Canadians to share in this great, great land.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Mario Laframboise Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, he should look at what Quebec has accomplished, not at what the country has accomplished.

Not only is the Conservative government dragging its feet by failing to do its part to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but it is also undermining efforts by Quebec and the provinces by refusing to set emissions targets that would provide the foundation for a carbon exchange. This government, which has become an obstacle to Quebec and the international community, must stop behaving like the oil companies' lackey.

This is the last day of negotiations in Cancun. Will the government reconsider its position and agree to do its part to fight climate change?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, our government seeks an outcome that includes commitments from all the major emitters and reflects the balance achieved by the Copenhagen accord. The Copenhagen accord has the support of 139 signatory countries, and covers not just 27% of greenhouse gas emissions, as reported by the Bloc, but 85% of total greenhouse gas emissions. When it comes to fighting climate change it is this government that is taking action.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives have been so unhelpful at the Cancun summit, many Canadians are wondering why they bothered to go. The part-time Minister of the Environment went to the summit and dismissed the Kyoto accord, dismissed Canada's responsibility to address its historic greenhouse gas emissions. These are “sidecar issues” he said.

Once again, Canada is seen around the world as a stumbling block to global climate progress. Are the Conservatives really trying to beat the Liberal record and get more fossil awards than they did?