House of Commons Hansard #111 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was standards.

Topics

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the government is not credible on the crime issue unless it is tough and maintains the gun registry.

The government is now delaying measures that have been asked for by chiefs of police, by police associations for years to assist in the tracing of imported weapons. No one can understand why the government listens to the gun lobby and does not listen to the police and the families of victims.

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, let me be very clear. Canadian law already states that all firearms must have a marking unique to that firearm. We cannot be any clearer than that.

The reality is the leader of the Liberal Party and his party are just not credible on crime. We see that each and every day in the House. We see that each and every day in committees of this place.

Whenever this government brings forward measures to get tough on violent offenders who cause havoc in our communities, the Liberal Party members always stand and vote against them.

Not one of the four bills before the public safety committee is likely to pass this year because the Liberal Party is stopping each and every one of those going forward. Shame on him and shame on his party.

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, today we are reminded that we must do all we can to ensure the tragedy at École Polytechnique is never repeated.

Time and time again the police, victims' groups and the RCMP agree that the federal gun registry is vital in protecting Canadians. The Prime Minister's own Mr. Fantino has said that the case is closed, that the gun registry debate is over and “it's a done deal”.

Will the Prime Minister listen to the families of victims and keep the gun registry?

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, there has been no party in the House that has been stronger on the rights of victims and standing up for victims against violent criminals. Our government is committed to making our communities safer. We continue to support gun control measures that assist law enforcement in protecting our communities and the safety and security of the public.

I wish the opposition, rather than standing and constantly defending the rights of criminals, would actually stand up for victims.

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is not about the rights of criminals. It is about the rights of victims and would-be victims.

Our police officers need the registry. Why? To protect communities and prevent another tragedy like the Polytechnique massacre from happening.

But the Prime Minister does not care. The Prime Minister will not listen to what the police, victims, their families and women's groups want. He will only listen to the American gun lobby.

How many more tragedies will it take for the Prime Minister to stop attacking gun control?

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

I agree, Mr. Speaker, that this is about victims. What concerns me is that member and her party consistently stand in the public safety committee and block every one of our efforts to protect the individuals in our country who deserve to have the right to walk down our streets in safety, who deserve to have the right to have security in their homes.

Why will that member not tell her colleagues to get the government legislation passed in the public safety committee so victims can be protected?

The Environment
Oral Questions

December 6th, 2010 / 2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canada caused a shock wave in Cancun by joining forces with Japan and Russia to oppose extending the Kyoto Protocol beyond 2012. After sabotaging negotiations in Copenhagen, shelving its so-called plan to reduce greenhouse gases and giving the oil companies carte blanche, Canada will continue to do everything it can to put off any international agreement.

Does this attitude not demonstrate that the Prime Minister is pandering to the big oil companies, which are telling him how to act, and that he will do anything to undermine the fight against climate change?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, climate change is a very serious issue. Our negotiators are in Cancun and we want to continue working on the Copenhagen accord, which was supported by 138 other countries in every part of the world. It is absolutely essential and imperative. If we want to reduce greenhouse gases, all the big polluters must participate. It is our priority. It is our responsibility in Cancun.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadian and Quebec companies may be forced to pay the price of the Conservatives' reckless behaviour and the blind eye they are turning to what the oil companies are doing. The European Union is planning to impose a tax on polluting products from countries, like Canada, that do not abide by the greenhouse gas standards.

Does the Prime Minister plan to penalize Quebec companies by siding with the oil companies under the pretext that Kyoto is a socialist plot, as he stated in 2002?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, what is happening is that the opposition parties, the coalition parties, want a carbon tax. This is not the government's policy. This is not something that we supported. We believe that is absolutely essential to reduce greenhouse gases. We agreed to reduce our greenhouse gases by an absolute 17%, which is exactly the same objective as that set by President Obama. We will continue to work very hard to meet this objective.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment is joining forces with Russia and Japan to oppose extending the Kyoto protocol beyond 2012. This decision is even more unfortunate because it is being done at the expense of Quebec and the industries that have done the necessary work to substantially reduce greenhouse gases.

Instead of fighting in the rearguard by trying to do as little as possible, what is the minister waiting for to face the facts and focus on developing a credible plan to reduce greenhouse gases?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, Canada already has a number of policies to fight climate change. We have a plan to reduce greenhouse gases by 17%. That is exactly the same figure that Obama has committed to in the United States. If we want to win the fight against climate change, it is very important to have all of the major polluters participate. In the last two years we have seen our emissions in Canada decrease by 2%, but emissions increased by 8% in China. That is environmentally unacceptable. We must all work together to fight climate change.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we could also compare Canada's and China's economic stimulus plans. There would be a difference there.

Instead of trying to sabotage environmental summits, the minister should produce a credible plan for reducing greenhouse gases. If we look at the fact that Conservative senators rejected Bill C-311 and that the government's continental approach is nothing more than a red herring to justify its inaction, it is clear that the minister is not truly ready to implement a plan to combat climate change.

Why is he undermining international negotiations? Why is he undermining negotiations and why does he not introduce a plan—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, we have no choice. We need economic growth, we need to create jobs and we need to combat climate change.

We have presented a plan for the transportation sector based on a real agreement with the United States and real regulations. We are the only country in the world with a real plan for banning coal-fired electricity generation. We have also made many investments to reduce oil sands emissions at each stage and to get results for Canada.