House of Commons Hansard #111 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was vehicles.

Topics

Desjardins Group
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, I would like to congratulate Desjardins Group, which was awarded the title of “Bank of the Year 2010 - Canada” by the prestigious British magazine, The Banker, published by the Financial Times.

This is the first time in Desjardins's history that it has participated in this competition and it is the first time that a Canadian cooperative financial institution has won this prestigious title. Desjardins Group was certainly recognized for its performance and business model, but also for its corporate culture, its role as a leader in sustainable development, its community involvement and its charitable work around the world.

Desjardins Group is a Quebec and Canadian success story that we can all be proud of. It is a pleasure to congratulate it today on receiving this important honour.

Diabetes
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Rod Bruinooge Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, diabetes significantly affects all Canadians, and more specifically, aboriginal Canadians. I know this to be true as I have seen it in many members of my own family. Thankfully, this disease, which has so significantly afflicted our people, can be avoided by aboriginal people by returning to a traditional aboriginal diet and avoiding many of the modern processed foods.

Health Canada now considers diabetes in first nations communities an epidemic, and the problem is getting worse in all age groups. Today there are three million Canadians living with diabetes and another six million Canadians who have pre-diabetes. Diabetes rates in Canada have doubled over the past decade and are forecast to nearly double by 2020. Each month, there are 6,000 Canadians who die due to this disease.

The Canadian Diabetes Association is hosting a complimentary diabetes risk assessment today for all members of Parliament in Room 256-S of Centre Block until 4:30 p.m. Please make a point of stopping by. In doing so, we will set an example for all Canadians.

Desjardins Group
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Robert Carrier Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, on December 6, 1900, Dorimène Roy-Desjardins and Alphonse Desjardins founded a financial co-operative movement in Quebec.

One hundred and ten years later, Desjardins Group has been awarded a 2010 Bank of the Year award by The Banker, a publication of the Financial Times of London, England.

With 5.8 million members and clients, 6,200 elected officers running its credit unions, caisses populaires and other organizations, as well as 42,200 employees, Quebec's co-operative model was rewarded for the professional management of its $157.2 billion in assets.

Its community roots, participatory democracy and local involvement were also commended. Last month it also received the Quebec corporate citizenship prize for its social agenda, notably its sustainable development policies.

I would like to congratulate the Desjardins Group, an institution that so wonderfully highlights Quebec's distinct character.

Public Safety
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

John Weston West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, today the Minister of Public Safety drew attention to the important issue of radicalization among the world's youth. Radicalization of youth and violent extremism concern us all and influence all Canadians by endangering lives and ripping communities and families apart.

We must remember that the worst terrorist attack in Canadian history was a direct result of radicalization that led to violence. We must remain vigilant against the threat of violent extremism.

Our government is working to combat this issue through stronger legislation, community outreach, the co-operation of our law enforcement and intelligence gathering organizations, and strengthening our relationships with Canada's long-time friends and allies, the efforts of which are guided by the principles of human rights and respect.

In order to be truly effective, governments, communities and law enforcement must work together towards the common goal of ensuring the safety and security of Canadians.

Liu Xiaobo
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise here today to pay tribute to the Chinese writer and scholar Liu Xiaobo who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his extraordinary contribution to the cause of peace and human rights.

He was sentenced to 11 years in prison for advocating rights guaranteed under China's constitution and international covenants. Rather than celebrate Liu Xiaobo for his fidelity to the constitution, the authorities imprisoned him on trumped up charges, placed his wife, Liu Xia, under house arrest, denied both the right to go to the Nobel ceremony this week in Oslo, and warned countries to boycott the ceremony or “face the consequences”.

So we say from this parliamentary podium to the authorities of the Chinese government, to free Liu Xiaobo and his wife. Permit them to attend the ceremony. Celebrate their contribution to the values of its great civilization. Take its place in the community of nations, not only as an economic superpower but one that is prepared to empower its people in the marketplace of ideas. Put itself on the right side of justice and not on the wrong side of history.

Violence against Women
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Lois Brown Newmarket—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to the 14 bright young women who violently lost their lives 21 years ago today in the worst single-day massacre in our history. The average age of the women who were killed was just under 24.

As we remember where we were on that horrific December day, it is important to honour those who died. They were smart and inspiring young women with promising futures. They came from communities across Quebec, and in one case, from Poland. They were musicians, athletes and scholars. They were loved as daughters, sisters, wives, friends and colleagues. All are still tremendously missed. These 14 young women live on in many ways, in the hearts of those who love them, through scholarships and other initiatives established in their memory, and gatherings held in their honour.

On this sad day, as we honour these young women, let us remain steadfast in our determination and solidarity to end violence against women.

Violence against Women
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, today New Democrats join all Canadians in mourning the victims of the tragic 1989 École Polytechnique massacre. We also remember women all over the world and in Canada who have died simply because they were women.

While we remember, we also need to take action and show leadership in putting an end to violence against women. For some time now, the NDP has been making considerable efforts to eliminate violence against women, whether by raising the issue of spousal abuse for the first time in the House of Commons, by co-founding the white ribbon campaign or by creating the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women.

While we mourn today, let us also turn towards action and pledge to one another that we will work towards the elimination of all forms of violence against women.

Halifax Explosion
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Armstrong Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, 93 years ago today, at 9:04 in the morning, Halifax suffered a great tragedy when it lost nearly 2,000 of its men, women, and children and saw thousands more injured due to a tragic Halifax explosion that rocked the city. The collision in The Narrows of Halifax Harbour of the Imo and the Mont-Blanc was the largest man-made non-nuclear explosion in the history of the world.

Neighbourhoods near the explosion were levelled. Halifax was in shock with the destruction, the devastation, the wounded and the dead. Despite an oncoming blizzard, relief efforts from local communities such as Truro, Kentville, Moncton and New Glasgow were sent to Halifax to help. Relief efforts from as far away as Boston arrived in the next days and weeks.

The city of Halifax was shattered that day, but Halifax was not broken. The port city lost many, but those who survived and residents who live there today will never forget this tragedy and will always remember those who sent help during a time of need.

National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, 21 years ago, 14 young female students at École Polytechnique were killed in cold blood. This tragic event is still fresh in our collective memory, and the raw emotions it still evokes to this day can make it difficult to analyze this act.

However, 21 years later, a few thinkers have taken on this difficult task. To some, this is a gratuitous act of madness with no intention. To others, the intention behind this mass murder was not only to kill these young women, but also to kill feminism and the advancement of women in society.

Regardless of the position one takes in this sensitive and emotional debate, the fact remains that this was a personal tragedy for many and a tragedy for society as a whole. More than ever, it reminds us of the need for balance, the need to understand other people's reality and their differences.

On this December 6, let us remember these 14 young women who died tragically and all those affected by this event.

National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, 21 years ago, 14 young women were violently murdered at École Polytechnique in Montreal. They were killed because they were women. It was an unspeakable tragedy that forced Canadians to seriously examine the frequency of violence against women.

Every day, women and girls in Canada and throughout the world are victims of emotional, physical and sexual violence, in the majority of cases at the hands of someone they know.

The Liberal Party has taken serious steps to attack the problem of violence against women, including defending the gun registry, which saves lives. However, the battle is not over.

Canadian women should be able to live their lives free of violence, even from the threat of violence, but that is not the case for too many women, particularly first nations, Métis and Inuit women.

Today I want every woman who has experienced gender-based violence to know that the Liberal Party of Canada and our entire parliamentary caucus is committed to end all acts of violence against women.

National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, on the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, we invite the men of Canada to become leaders in combatting violence against women and girls.

Men must set the example in their communities. They must speak out against violence and encourage their colleagues, friends, brothers and neighbours to do the same. Remaining silent is a sign of weakness.

The elimination of violence against women is one of the cornerstones of our government's tough on crime agenda.

Since 2007, our government has invested over $30 million in projects designed to eliminate violence against women and girls in Canada.

Today, as we remember the tragedy that occurred in Montreal, our hearts go out to families who have lost loved ones as a result of violence.

Let us remain true to our principles and strong in our commitment to ensuring that all citizens are treated fairly, equitably and respectfully. Let us speak out against intolerable acts of violence against women and girls.

Gun Control
Oral Questions

December 6th, 2010 / 2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, today is the anniversary of the Polytechnique massacre. Together with other parliamentarians, I placed a rose to commemorate one of the 14 victims.

It is on behalf of the victims that I am asking the government why it is still trying to block measures to trace weapons and curb smuggling. Why is this government not listening to the victims' families, not listening to the police, who need these measures, and giving in to pressure from gun lobbyists?

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I think all of us in all political parties, each and every member of Parliament, takes today to remember the tragic loss of some young women who had promising futures. This is something on which I would not want to be political.

What I can say is our government is committed to making our communities safer and to working with law enforcement on meaningful gun control that actually works and makes those communities safer.

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the police need these measures. They will help trace weapons. People do not understand why the government is ignoring victims' families. It tried to abolish the gun registry. Now it is trying to keep the police from doing their job.

When will the Conservatives learn from the Polytechnique massacre and give the police the measures they need?

Gun Control
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, Canadian law already states that all firearms must have a marking unique to that firearm. We believe in gun control, gun control that works, gun control that will actually make our communities safer.

We also believe in putting violent offenders in prison for more time than the lax policies of the previous Liberal government. That is why the Minister of Justice and the Minister of Public Safety have brought forward a whole series of legislation to ensure Canadians can be safer. We hope the Liberal Party will get on board and help us pass the legislation.