House of Commons Hansard #113 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was rail.

Topics

Human Rights
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Borys Wrzesnewskyj Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the past, this House has hosted legendary figures who have distinguished themselves in the battle for human rights. Today, Mustafa Dzemiliev is here in Ottawa.

At the age of six months, he and his family and the entire 200,000 Crimean Tatar people were ethnically cleansed from their ancestral land and deported en masse to central Asia by Soviet dictator, Joseph Stalin. Forty per cent of their population died.

As a young man speaking out for the rights of his people to preserve their culture and language and their right to return to their ancestral home, Mr. Dzemiliev spent 18 brutal years in the Soviet gulag. In the 1990s, he led the return of his people to Crimea and today is chairman of the Mejlis parliament of the Crimean Tatar people.

His harrowing personal story and that of the Crimean Tatars is to be inspired by the triumph of human spirit over evil.

On behalf of the House of Commons, I welcome Mr. Dzemiliev to Canada to share with us his vision of peace for his people and for the Crimean peninsula.

Liberal Party of Canada
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Shelly Glover Saint Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Liberal member for Winnipeg South Centre stood in this place and said, “If the government wants to be tough on crime, then it should call an inquiry”.

Despite what the Liberals say, calling an inquiry is not what it means to be tough on crime. Research is not action. Unlike the member for Winnipeg South Centre, our Conservative government does not just talk the talk and call an inquiry, we actually walk the walk.

Yesterday, we successfully passed legislation that will make our streets and communities safer by strengthening the national sex offender registry and the national DNA data bank. We have also introduced important legislation that would eliminate pardons for dangerous offenders, repeal the faint hope clause and end house arrest for serious crimes.

When will the Liberal-led coalition stop the double talk, stop stalling and finally get on the side of victims and support our tough on crime legislation?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, according to the environment commissioner, this Conservative government has no plan for protecting drinking water, no plan for protecting our oceans from pollution and no plan for adapting to climate change. The environment commissioner has painted a dismal picture.

With such a pathetic record, why does the government believe it can teach anyone anything in Cancun?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, we appreciate the environment commissioner's report. The matters commented on by the commissioner are areas in which the government is taking action and making investments. If the Liberal Party has constructive or positive suggestions, I am prepared to listen to them.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, my suggestion would be that they take the environment seriously and do good work. I would say that we cannot be leaders on the world stage if we are not leaders at home. For the past five years, the Conservatives' endeavours on the international scene have had one objective: to sabotage a climate change agreement.

Does the Prime Minister understand that his lack of principles has cost us dearly internationally and contributed to our defeat at the UN—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The Right Hon. Prime Minister.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is clear from the Leader of the Opposition's reply that he does not have any specific suggestions. With regard to climate change, our government's position is clear and very different than that of the opposition. The opposition wants to implement the Kyoto protocol, which excludes two-thirds of greenhouse gas emissions, whereas we are looking for a binding, effective international agreement that includes all the major emitters in the world.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we have to situate this performance at Cancun in a wider perspective. Let us look at the opportunities the government has squandered just this year.

It held a G8-G20 summit and it turned into a fiasco. It went for a seat on the security council and it blew it. It had Camp Mirage and then lost it. It went to Cancun and all it managed to achieve was to sabotage an international climate change agreement. Meanwhile, it has stood silently while Haiti's democracy is in peril.

How can the Prime Minister explain this pattern of obstruction, indifference and missed opportunities?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, of course the opposite is totally at variance with that.

For instance, let us take Haiti. This government, this country, has been a leader in responding to the crises in Haiti and in helping that country move forward. As for the economy, as is well-known through the G8-G20 and other forums, Canada has been leading the advanced world in economic performance and leading in solutions to the global economic recession. That is one of the reasons that, a year later, we are still in government.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment is under attack in Cancun for the Conservatives' absurdly dismal record on the environment. Now we learn that the minister is adding insult to injury by trashing the planned protected area in the Horn Plateau in the Northwest Territories, leaving it vulnerable to possible drilling and mining.

The Minister of Infrastructure promised the grand chief that this would be protected for two more years. What happened? How can the minister put this pristine area at risk?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Saint Boniface
Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, a national wildlife area designation does not preclude development. This government is of the view that well-managed resource development can co-exist with protected areas as long as it does not impact conservation values.

It is important to remember that there are numerous other tools in place to protect the environment and manage development in the Northwest Territories. Any plans for exploration or development would have to include measures to mitigate environmental impacts.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, the member should try explaining that PMO answer to the grand chief.

The Conservative government is again embarrassing Canada on the world stage with no federal strategy to adapt to climate change, no ability to clean up major oil spills, no good answers to environmental petitions, no system to deal with hazardous chemical spills in our oceans, cancelling ecohousing programs, cancelling wind energy programs, closing our Arctic research foundation and cancelling climate change adaptation programs.

Why is the government embarrassing us again by closing a 14,000 kilometre square park in the Horn Plateau?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I disagree with the hon. member's conclusion.

When one looks at what the government is doing to make sure that we are ready for any problems both in the north and in the rest of the country, here are three examples. Transport Canada has updated its environmental prevention and response national preparedness plan. By this coming spring the Canadian Coast Guard will have updated its natural environment response strategy. And Environment Canada will be in place by the end of this year with its strategic emergency management plan.

The Environment Commissioner asked us to work more closely together and we are taking that advice. These strategies show we are moving ahead.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon has denounced the laissez-faire attitude of certain countries when it comes to fighting climate change, saying that we must not repeat the failure of Copenhagen. Yet to the Conservative government, the Copenhagen accord on climate change is a success.

Is the Conservative government not in the process of doing in Cancun what it did so well in Copenhagen, namely stymying all negotiations on committing to new greenhouse gas emission reductions after 2012?

The Environment
Oral Questions

December 8th, 2010 / 2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Copenhagen accord was only a first step. It is important to have a binding agreement that includes all the major emitters around the world. The Bloc Québécois's position is that only a third of the greenhouse gas emissions should be controlled by the Kyoto protocol. That is a ridiculous position on dealing with greenhouse gases. All the major emitters have to be included.