House of Commons Hansard #3 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, if the government did away with the tax benefits for oil companies, it could start compensating Quebec for harmonizing the TVQ with the GST. It could also start improving employment insurance and the guaranteed income supplement for our seniors and introduce a real plan to help the forestry sector, instead of Conservative gimmicks.

Is it not true that this government's choices prove that there is no future for Quebec in the Canadian federal system?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, when we are talking about seniors, we are talking about income splitting; seniors can split income for greater net gain. In addition, the age credit has been doubled. As for tax harmonization, we said so once again in the budget, the commitment is there in black and white. We are negotiating in good faith. For the unemployed, we extended the work sharing agreement by 26 weeks. In small communities, this is paying off, because jobs are being maintained.

Of course, we know that the Bloc voted against all these measures. It is shameful.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

March 5th, 2010 / 11:20 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, on page 259 of the budget presented yesterday, it says that the auto industry, which is concentrated in Ontario of course, received $9.7 billion, while the forestry sector received a mere $170 million.

However, these two sectors, which are both in crisis, have about the same number of jobs. As I travelled around Quebec, I saw that the forestry industry needs a cash infusion now more than ever if it is to stay alive.

How could the Minister of Finance conspire with Quebec Conservatives to present another budget—

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. Minister of State.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, the Bloc Québécois is up to its usual tricks: disinformation and twisting the facts.

Quebec's forestry industry is governed by an agreement that we signed with our American partners at the request of the provinces and the forestry industry, an agreement that allows us to export wood to the United States.

The Bloc knows very well that the auto sector is subject to an agreement among the United States, Ontario and Canada in a free market. It is apples and oranges. They are trying to make political hay, but we are taking care of workers and we will not sink to the Bloc's level of rhetoric.

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Daniel Paillé Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, for companies to export wood, they have to be operating and able to produce it.

These businesses are on their knees because they have been left to their own devices since the crisis began. The forestry crisis started long before the recession. Yesterday, the CEP pointed out that without loan guarantees, the measures in the budget will be useless.

Why are they ignoring the needs of Quebec's forestry industry?

Forestry Industry
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, in order to sell wood, one needs buyers. Right now, demand for our forestry products—softwood lumber and pulp and paper—is soft. We will continue to develop markets for these products.

As for loan guarantees, it seems to me that they just do not want to see them. Anyone can visit Export Development Canada's website. EDC supports industry across Canada in all sectors. It offers loan guarantees, accounts receivable insurance and access to credit. It has made some $20 billion in financial products available to Quebec's forestry industry over two years. Of course, it is easy to avoid seeing the truth. We are not just talking; we are taking action.

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to jobs, the statements of the government certainly do ring hollow.

The government's budget actually predicts that we will have a higher unemployment rate in 2010 than we had last year. Half a million people lost their jobs in the recession, 1.6 million people are out of work and 800,000 people stand to run out of their EI premiums and have nothing to support their families, yet we have the same old policies that have not worked.

Where is the plan to create jobs for Canadians so we can get the economy going for them?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I think I join all members of the House to say that we are pleased to see the NDP leader is still full of energy and fight with respect to his important work here.

The budget we presented yesterday is a jobs and economic growth budget. We are moving forward, full speed ahead, firing on all eight cylinders, with Canada's economic action plan. Since July, we have seen 135,000 net new jobs created. With the economy beginning to fire on all eight cylinders through our economic action plan, we see more jobs, more hope, more opportunity. That is why we are moving forward with more stimulus, more construction and more hope.

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, the victims of the recession are losing a great deal. The banks are the big winners in this budget.

Choices are made in a budget.

The Conservatives have chosen to make the banks, oil companies and the most profitable companies in the country even richer instead of helping seniors get out of poverty by increasing the guaranteed income supplement benefits, as the New Democratic Party has proposed.

Why has the government chosen to help the banks and oil companies instead of seniors in this crisis?

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, long before Canada's economic action plan began to bring real benefits to the economy in the country this government gave significant support to seniors.

Since 1999, the level of poverty among seniors in the country has fallen from 7.9% to less than 5%, thanks to the great efforts of the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development.

This government is committed to pensions. We are committed to the old age security. We are committed to the guaranteed income supplement.

We have taken significant measures with respect to helping those who are unemployed, whether it is long-term worker benefits, whether it is additional measures in training, whether it is the great work on work-sharing. We will continue to do that because we need more jobs, more hope and more opportunities.

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the matter of the Afghan detainees, the government has come up with a new stalling tactic. At first it was prorogation, now it is appointing Justice Iacobucci to review the documents relating to the transfer of detainees and torture in Afghanistan. Mr. Iacobucci is supposed to report to whom? He is supposed to report to the justice minister. The House did not ask for that.

Instead of playing games with more delay, why will the government not just come clean and give members of the House access to the documents as it has requested? Why so much contempt for Parliament? Why so much contempt for the truth?

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we are talking about thousands of documents. Government officials are working diligently, as fast as they can, to make all legally available documents available to members.

With respect to the whole question of redacted documents, yes, the hon. member is in part correct. We have enlisted the help of Mr. Justice Iacobucci. The man is beyond reproach. He is held in eminent esteem by Canadians. He will give advice with respect to those documents.

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government will reduce funding for international development by $4 billion over five years, in particular by cutting CIDA's budget. The most vulnerable people in the world, who are counting on Canada's help for their basic needs, are the ones who will pay for the financial incompetence of this government.

Will the government finally admit that its incompetence is the direct cause of Canada's diminishing influence on the world stage?

International Cooperation
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Kootenay—Columbia
B.C.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I want the member to know that I totally reject the premise of her question.

The fact is we have doubled aid over the last very short period of time by increasing funding year after year by 8%. We are going to maintain that at the level of $5 billion into the future.

She should be very proud of what this government has done of behalf of Canadians.