House of Commons Hansard #27 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was products.

Topics

Procedure and House Affairs
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Procedure and House Affairs
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Procedure and House Affairs
Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

(Motion agreed to)

Earthquake in Haiti
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present a petition signed by Canadians from eastern Ontario and western Quebec concerning the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti.

The signatories are asking the government to be more flexible in determining who can be included in the family class. Specifically, they want the government to create a special immigration process to enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents to sponsor family members who were personally and directly affected by the January 12, 2010, earthquake in Haiti, regardless of their age.

Child Pornography
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Daniel Petit Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of all Canadian citizens, I am presenting an initial petition condemning cyberporn and seeking to protect young people from becoming victims of child pornography.

I am presenting another petition from a group of Ontario citizens, also condemning child pornography, to prevent individuals who use online child pornography from attacking our young children.

Investment Canada Act
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition signed by dozens of people from the riding of Nickel Belt.

The petition states that when Canadian-owned Inco was acquired by Vale S.A. in 2006, the company made undertakings to the Government of Canada. When Canadian-owned Falconbridge was acquired by Xstrata, it also committed to undertakings with the Government of Canada. Industry Canada, Vale S.A. and Xstrata have refused to make these specific undertakings public.

Therefore, the petitioners request that the Minister of Industry and the House of Commons amend section 36 of the Investment Canada Act in order to make the details of undertakings made by foreign companies during Canadian acquisitions public. They further request that the Minister of Industry make the undertakings made during the acquisition of Inco and Falconbridge public. They support Bill C-488, Bill C-489 and Bill C-490.

Firearms Registry
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have four petitions to present.

The first petition is on the long gun registry. It says that the long gun registry was originally budgeted to cost Canadians $2 million, but the cost spiralled out of control to an estimated price tag of $2 billion a decade later. The registry has not saved one single life since its introduction.

The petitioners would rather see their taxpayer dollars being used to keep guns out of the hands of criminals. They are therefore calling upon the House of Commons to support any legislation that would cancel the long gun registry and streamline the Firearms Act.

Skin Cancer
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, the second petition regards skin cancer.

One in seven Canadians will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It is one of the most rapidly increasing cancers in Canada and is the second most common cancer in young adults.

The petitioners are calling for support on a national skin cancer and melanoma initiative to provide much needed access to newer drug treatments and funding for research and educational programs.

The third—

Skin Cancer
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Elmwood—Transcona.

Air Passengers' Bill of Rights
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions to present today.

Dozens of Canadians are calling on Parliament to adopt Canada's first air passengers' bill of rights. Bill C-310 would compensate air passengers with all Canadian carriers, including charters, anywhere they fly in the world. The bill provides compensation for overbooked flights, cancelled flights and long tarmac delays. It addresses issues such as late and misplaced baggage. It requires all-inclusive pricing by airlines in all of their advertising.

Legislation of this type has been in effect in Europe now for well over five years. The question is why Air Canada passengers should be treated better in Europe than in their home country, Canada.

Airlines would have to inform passengers of flight changes, either delays or cancellations. The new rules would have to be posted at the airports. Airlines would have to inform passengers of their rights and the process to file for compensation. If the airlines followed these rules, it would cost them nothing.

The petitioners call on the government to support Bill C-310, which would introduce Canada's first air passengers' bill of rights.

Earthquake in Chile
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

NDP

Jim Maloway Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, the second petition calls on the Canadian government to match funds personally donated by the citizens of Canada for the victims of the earthquake in Chile. As members know, on February 27, 2010 there was an 8.8 magnitude earthquake in southern Chile. Communities across Canada mobilized and money has been raised already.

The question is when the Prime Minister is going to give the same treatment to the victims of the earthquake in Chile as he did for the victims of the earthquake in Haiti and match funds personally donated by Canadians to help the victims of the earthquake in Chile.

Questions on the Order paper
Routine Proceedings

April 16th, 2010 / 12:10 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 31, 32, 38, 89, 110 and 117.

Question No. 31
Questions on the Order paper
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Liberal

John McKay Scarborough—Guildwood, ON

With specific reference to the Development Assistance Accountability Act, in detail: (a) why has the NGO KAIROS had its funding from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) removed; and (b) how does KAIROS’ policies and programs not fit within the mandate of the Act or CIDA priorities?

Question No. 31
Questions on the Order paper
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, the response is as follows: a) The Official Development Assistance Accountability Act (2008, c.17), stipulates that official development assistance may be provided only if the competent minister is of the opinion that it (a) contributes to poverty reduction; (b) takes into account the perspectives of the poor; and (c) is consistent with international human rights standards.

This act provides a framework within which CIDA plans its directive development programming and responds to proposals from Canadian organizations.

CIDA receives more proposals than it has the budget to fund, so that even some proposals that meet the broad framework of the act must be turned down.

b) Since taking office in 2006, our government has indicated both in Speeches from the Throne and subsequent budgets that we would be working to make Canada’s international assistance more effective.

A critical element of our effectiveness agenda is to focus our resources both geographically and thematically. Another element is to ensure that all of the projects we support deliver results that make a real difference in the lives of those living in poverty. With CIDA’s new approach to aid effectiveness, some program and project proposals will not be funded.

Question No. 32
Questions on the Order paper
Routine Proceedings

12:10 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

With respect to the appointment to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Governing Council of Dr. Bernard Prigent, Vice President and Medical Director of Pfizer Canada: (a) as per the requirements for Order in Council (OIC) selection processes, what were the selection criteria developed to outline qualifications required for the position in question; (b) as per the requirements for OIC selection processes, how was the pool of suitable candidates reached; (c) before the Minister of Health made the recommendation of this appointment to the Governor General in Council, did she consult with the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner on the appointment and, if so, what was the Commissioner’s opinion and the reasons for it on the matter, and, if not, why not; (d) was anyone at CIHR given any opportunity to comment on the appointment prior to its announcement and, if not, why not, and, if so (i) who was given this opportunity, (ii) what responses were received, (iii) were any concerns of objections raised and, if so, what were they; (e) what options are available to the CIHR President, Governing Council members and Scientific Directors before and after an appointment is announced if they disagree with an Order in Council appointment because they anticipate it could negatively affect CIHR’s ability to fulfill its legislative mandate; (f) what options are available to the members of the CIHR Standing Committee on Ethics before and after an appointment is announced if they disagree with an Order in Council appointment because they anticipate it could negatively affect CIHR’s ability to fulfill its ethics mandate; (g) was anyone (apart from anyone at CIHR) outside of the Minister’s Office given any opportunity to comment on the appointment prior to its announcement and, if so, what were the responses, and, if not, why not; (h) did the Minister of Health consider names from pharmaceutical companies other than Pfizer and, if so, why was the Pfizer person selected instead of someone from a different company, and, if not, why not; (i) did the Minister of Health consider names of individuals from business sectors other than the pharmaceutical industry (e.g., banking, natural resources, etc.) and, if so, why was a person from the pharmaceutical industry selected instead of someone from a different sector, and, if not, why not; (j) where did Dr. Prigent’s name originate for consideration for membership on the CIHR Governing Council; and (k) who participated in any discussions with the Minister or her staff about the Minister’s recommendation of Dr. Prigent for membership on the CIHR Governing Council?