House of Commons Hansard #53 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was summits.

Topics

Automotive Industry
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House that the Minister of Industry is in St. Catharines, Ontario today to join GM in announcing a new $245 million investment in its St. Catharines powertrain facility. This builds upon another recent announcement of $235 million to support next generation engine production.

This new investment will secure 400 jobs. That is 100 more jobs than outlined in GM's restructuring commitment.

This is yet another sign that the government's support for the auto sector has helped it emerge from this economic downturn stronger and more competitive than ever.

G8 and G20 Summits
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Gerard Kennedy Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, incredibly the government has mismanaged its way to a $1.3 billion price tag for this G20 summit, and it is still not covering many of the basic costs.

The City of Toronto urged the government to move the summit location, reduce disruptions and costs and possible damage. It refused to do this. Now the city has to act to ensure safety, removing 1,000 pieces of street furniture, dedicating staff at a cost of $20 million.

I have a basic question. Will the government respect and fully compensate Toronto for costs devoted to the summit and protest-related damages to city businesses? Will it do that?

G8 and G20 Summits
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, this government will always treat the people of Toronto fairly. For years the people of Toronto lacked infrastructure funding. For years the people of Toronto lacked funding to support their public transit. This government has shown unprecedented commitment to the people of Toronto, whether it is in the area of public transit, whether it is municipal infrastructure, whether it is not just making the gas tax permanent, but doubling it for them.

We are very pleased to do that and we will continue to stand up for Toronto.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Johanne Deschamps Laurentides—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 2008, the former president of CIDA, Robert Greenhill, referred to the Canadian Council for International Co-operation—the CCIC—as a key partner. Today, the CCIC cannot even get a response from the Minister of International Cooperation regarding the renewal of their funding agreement.

Can the minister explain why she is dragging her feet on renewing funding for the CCIC, an organization that does such excellent work?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, the proposal is under review by CIDA, but this does give me the opportunity to remind the member that because of our good fiscal management and growth, we are coming out of the recession.

However, the global economic recession has had an impact on developing countries. It has put over a billion people into hunger and extreme poverty.

That is why we have to make sure that our international development money is going to get results, is going to make a difference for those people who are living in extreme poverty.

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, victims and families of the hepatitis C tainted blood catastrophe are being told that their approved compensation claims cannot be paid because the settlement pool of funds has run dry. These people have been through enough, but the minister is just throwing up her hands and saying it is not her problem. She is trying to shift the blame to the fund's administrators, but she knows that they cannot do anything until the government either allows the transfer of funds or ponies up more cash.

Will the minister accept responsibility for this file and finally stand up for the victims of hepatitis C?

Health
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, in 2006 our government did stand up for the victims of hepatitis C and announced a $1 billion trust fund to compensate those individuals.

The way I understand the program is that this is a court-ordered organization, established through the courts, and there are two sets of funds. If the victims of hep C want to pursue the compensation for lost wages, their lawyers are to contact Crawford & Company to make the changes through the courts, because this is independent. It is a court-ordered change and the individuals should be contacting their lawyers and Crawford & Company.

The Economy
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

David Sweet Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, praise for Canada's economy keeps coming in from around the world. The influential The Economist magazine calls Canada “an economic star”. The OECD agreed, saying that Canada's economy “shines”. Both it and the IMF predict Canada's economic growth will lead the G7 this year and next.

Could the parliamentary secretary please update the House as to why such praise for Canada's economy is absolutely warranted?

The Economy
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, indeed in the first quarter of 2010, Canada's economy grew by 6.1%. Not only is that the strongest quarterly growth rate in a decade, it is the strongest first quarter in all of the G7 countries.

What does that mean to Canadians? It means the economy is growing stronger, Canada's economic action plan is working and jobs are being created, in fact 285,000 new jobs since July of last year.

We are on the right track.

G8 and G20 Summits
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Gerard Kennedy Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, with the G20 summit, the federal government has given us another demonstration of how it is mismanaging this country.

Despite the $1.3 billion incredible price tag, it is sticking Toronto businesses with the cost of losses related to the summit. Unless businesses stay completely open and fully staffed, incurring unnecessary costs, the government will not compensate them at all, not a nickel for lost earnings.

As usual, the government's idea of partnership with cities is "Do it my way". Why is the government sticking it to Toronto residents and businesses? Why is the city of Toronto left holding the bag for the government's incompetence?

G8 and G20 Summits
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is not legally bound to pay compensation for losses suffered as a result of international meetings. Nonetheless, there are precedents where compensation has been provided to those impacted by extraordinary security measures.

The policy in place is fair and has been effective in the past. It is the same policy that was in place for le Sommet des Amériques in Quebec City, the summit in Kananaskis, as well as at La Francophonie. The assessment of all claims will be made in close co-operation with Audit Services Canada.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

June 1st, 2010 / 3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of His Excellency Edward Nalbandian, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic Armenia.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

I would also like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Doug Horner, Deputy Premier of Alberta, Minister of Advanced Education and Technology and Minister of Liaison to the Canadian Forces.

Presence in Gallery
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!