House of Commons Hansard #61 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was colombia.

Topics

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, my noisy friend from the porta-potty party over there is playing with numbers that he knows absolutely nothing about of which he states.

The simple fact is this a capability that is required by the Canadian Forces. It is required of us by our allies. It will give jobs to Canadians. It will give jobs to Canadians by the thousands.

Every program that we have done, and frankly any program that the Liberals did when they were in power, every contract that the military does has dollar for dollar value back to Canadian industry, back to Canadian jobs, and back to the people of Canada. The hon. member should get his facts straight.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, two years ago today all parties gathered in the House to recognize and apologize for the suffering of first nations, Inuit and Métis who had been mistreated and abused in residential schools. It seemed like a turning point, but unfortunately, they were merely words from the government. Since then it has been one failed policy after another.

This year the Conservatives promised to finally endorse the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but they have changed their minds.

Why does the government continue to say one thing and do another when it comes to Canada's aboriginal people?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Au contraire, Mr. Speaker. Not only was an apology made, it was an apology made by the Prime Minister of Canada after a long, long wait where other parties did not make such an apology.

After that apology, we have made record investments in housing, a record amount of investments in new schools and in education, tripartite agreements across the country, investments in child and family services from coast to coast to improve the lot of families, and important legislation to give more rights to aboriginal people.

In word and deed, we continue to work closely with our aboriginal--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Labrador.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Todd Russell Labrador, NL

Mr. Speaker, the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, which helped thousands of people across the country deal with the legacy of residential schools, has been killed by this government.

There were 134 projects from coast to coast to coast simply abandoned. Aboriginal students received $2,000 less in educational support than the Canadian average, and they fall further behind. There are more than 8,000 first nations children in care and the government ignores their pleas.

Where is the hope and promise the apology was to bring? Why the hollow words two years ago?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, there is quite a bit of nonsense in that statement. Not only was an apology made and forgiveness sought in a very sincere way, but this was a very historic moment here in the House of Commons and across the country.

What I hear from aboriginal people is that they do not want empty promises. As former minister Bob Nault said about the Kelowna accord, “That thing won't work”. It is okay to say we want things to get better for aboriginal people, but we actually have to do things. Part of doing things involves increasing child and family services, and changing the model. It involves increasing funding for education and changing the model, and Mr. Speaker, we--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Kitchener—Conestoga.

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Harold Albrecht Kitchener—Conestoga, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week has been a busy one for Canada's immigration minister. He introduced legislation to crack down on crooked immigration consultants as well as to make Canadian citizenship more difficult to obtain through fraud and easier to lose because of it.

Meantime, the Liberal Party's position on refugee reform would change, based on whichever side of the bed the Liberal leader's former Quebec lieutenant happened to wake up on that day.

Will the immigration minister update the House on how this week's immigration changes will benefit all Canadians, including immigrants?

Citizenship and Immigration
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary Southeast
Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney Minister of Citizenship

Yes, Mr. Speaker, this week we did announce changes to crack down on crooked consultants, to throw the book at those who would exploit newcomers to Canada by charging them thousands of dollars. These consultants basically con newcomers. We will make that a criminal offence.

We have also brought in legislation to protect the integrity and value of Canadian citizenship from those who would cheapen or abuse it. We will make sure that residency means physical presence in Canada, that crooked citizenship consultants are now regulated in the future.

These measures, combined with an emerging parliamentary consensus to address the urgent need for refugee reform, are very positive for all Canadians, particularly new Canadians.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, TV's Mike Holmes tells us we should not even build a sundeck without getting three quotes because competition is the only way we know we are getting best value. Yet, the Conservatives want to sole-source the largest military procurement in Canadian history without any competition. That means we pay their price on their terms with no competitive pressure whatsoever.

If Karlheinz Schreiber were not in jail in Germany, I would be convinced he was bamboozling another generation of Conservative cabinet ministers.

What other arms dealing lobbyist has convinced this government to throw reason, logic, good judgment, and any business sense out the window?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, to repeat once again, the next generation fighter capability is important to Canada and important to our Canada first defence strategy. No decision has yet been made. Any decision will conform to government rules.

I would point out that if it were up to that party over there, we would not have a military.

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the problem is that as recently as May 27, the Minister of National Defence stood in his place right over there and guaranteed to us that there will be an open, competitive, transparent process in the purchase of our next fighter aircraft, yet secret cabinet documents reveal now that the minister has no intention of having an open and competitive process, because the Americans would not like it.

A competitive bidding process would give us a better plane for a better price and would provide better regional and industrial benefits. Since when are the Conservatives opposed to a free market? Since when are the Conservatives opposed to free competition?

National Defence
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Edmonton Centre
Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the member knows absolutely nothing about which he speaks, except I will point out, or maybe ask the question, if it is a secret cabinet document, how did he get it? Did he break the law? It really cannot be much of a secret if he got the document.

Again I will say that the program for the next generation fighter is important to Canada. It is important to jobs for Canadians. The process is going to follow all government rules. We are going to get the job done for our Canadian airmen and airwomen and the people who rely on them.

Climate Change
Oral Questions

June 11th, 2010 / 11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the most recent report by the Ouranos group of 250 Quebec scientists looks at the negative impact that climate change will have on Quebec. Among the problems, the report mentions shoreline erosion, warming cities and change in river flow.

Is it not time for the Conservatives to wake up, open their eyes and realize that siding with the oil companies will have disastrous consequences to the economy of Quebec?

Climate Change
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Langley
B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the member knows that is not true.

Canada is a country of unparalleled beauty. This government is committed to preserving and protecting the natural environment for this generation and coming generations. The fact is that for the first time in Canada, under this government greenhouse gas emissions have stabilized and they have gone down. How much have they gone down? Over 2%. What happened under the Liberals? They skyrocketed. They went up 26%.

We are getting it done.