House of Commons Hansard #61 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was trade.

Topics

Climate Change
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, people everywhere are sounding the alarm and calling for solutions to climate change problems. Just recently, six Nobel laureates called on the Conservative government to put climate change on the agenda for the G8 and the G20.

As the host country, why is Canada refusing to take action?

Climate Change
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, maybe the hon. member did not understand the response, but the question was asked yesterday by the Leader of the Bloc Québécois, and the Prime Minister answered by saying that notwithstanding the fact that the G20 is an economic meeting, the fact remains that a large number of topics will be addressed and discussed. The Prime Minister has met with President Calderon and, as the Prime Minister mentioned yesterday, this topic will be discussed.

Automotive Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Frank Valeriote Guelph, ON

Mr. Speaker, last year GM terminated 240 Canadian dealerships in a process described as being a “mistake” and “arbitrary” by GM's CEO. Under U.S. congressional pressure, 660 U.S. dealerships were reinstated. Guelph's Robinson Pontiac Buick, cited by GM for over 100% sales efficiency in 2009 and having just spent $2 million on upgrades at GM's request, is being closed for no good reason.

Why, as a GM shareholder, does the government refuse to take action to protect these Canadian dealerships and the jobs and they represent?

Automotive Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, of course that is a question to be asked of GM, not of the Government of Canada.

While I am standing I would point out that the actions taken by this government saved thousands of Canadian jobs in the auto sector. In fact, due to the actions of this Canadian government, we have created over 300,000 new jobs in the last year.

We are applauded across the world by every industrialized country for our actions taken. In fact the IMF, the World Economic Forum and the OECD have called Canada a star. The Economist said that we are an economic star. The OECD said that we shine.

Automotive Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have met with General Motors and we have also met with a number of their dealers.

It is clear that GM's intransigence makes no sense. A number of very successful and very profitable dealerships might have to close.

As a shareholder of General Motors, it is time for this government to follow in the U.S. government's footsteps and support the dealerships who are fighting with GM to stay open.

When will the shareholders across the way stop being complicit in these closures and layoffs?

Automotive Industry
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont
Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, that question has nothing to do with government business, but this government has shown unprecedented support for the auto sector.

With regard to the economy, I would point out that a number of commentators and experts have talked about Canada's performance. One of those experts is Christine Lagarde, France's finance minister, who said:

I think...we can be inspired by...the Canadian situation. There were some people who said, “I want to be Canadian”.

We do not even know how the Liberal leader feels about that statement.

G8 and G20 Summits
Oral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, back in January we were told that Canada's G8 and G20 summits would highlight the environment, development and the global economy. Climate change, we were told, would figure prominently at both meetings, and Canada would set an example by increasing its own spending on maternal and child health in developing countries.

Today the Conservatives are offering nothing more than an expensive tourism ad campaign. The environment is nowhere on the agenda. There is no money on the table for maternal and child health.

The question is: What went so wrong? How did it go off the rails? Where is our commitment--

G8 and G20 Summits
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs.

G8 and G20 Summits
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, my colleague has asked two questions.

First, the Prime Minister assured colleagues in the House that this issue will be discussed at the upcoming G20 meeting. Climate change will be discussed by the leaders. As members know, the Prime Minister did meet with President Calderón.

On the issue of child and maternal health, let me tell members what Jill Sheffield, president and founder of Women Deliver, said in the Ottawa Citizen. Colleagues should know about that. In talking about the Prime Minister, she said:

“It is a wonderful thing for him to do”, said...Jill Sheffield of [the Prime Minister]'s initiative. “It puts him right in step with the secretary general of the United Nations and heads of all these UN agencies.”

Colombia
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, after six months of stonewalling, the NDP forced the release by the government of a withheld report on Colombia.

In addition to the systematic killings of labour activists, aboriginal people, Afro-Colombians and human rights advocates by government forces, we now find out about the systematic targeting of lesbian, gay and bisexual community leaders. We mourn their deaths.

Why did the government hide this information and why is it rewarding the Colombian regime for the murder of lesbian, gay and bisexual community leaders?

Colombia
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Pontiac
Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this is a draft report. It was never completed, nor was it publicly released by its authors. This draft report was prepared over two years ago by Conflict Analysis Resource Center for the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. It was not written by or prepared for the Government of Canada.

Canada supports the continued improvement of human rights in Colombia, which is why the Canada-Colombia free trade agreement and the labour side agreement contain strong and enforceable provisions to protect and promote human rights.

Pensions
Oral Questions

June 11th, 2010 / 11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Bruce Stanton Simcoe North, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government has been working hard on improving Canada's retirement income system.

First, we are improving federally regulated pension plans. Then, because nearly 90% of pension plans are provincially regulated, we are working with our provincial and territorial partners to come up with pan-Canadian solutions.

Both levels of government are listening to the ideas of everyday Canadians on how we can make our pension plan and system better for all retirees.

Would the parliamentary secretary please inform the House on the next steps we are talking about to strengthen Canada's retirement system?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform the House that early next week our award-winning finance minister will be meeting with his provincial and territorial partners to discuss Canada's retirement income system.

Based on the ideas we have heard from Canadians, we have proposed some smart improvements for discussion. They include modest increases to the Canada pension plan and tax changes to encourage multi-employer pensions.

One thing our government will not do is impose unilateral federal dictates that some would have us do. We will work with our provincial and territorial partners.

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, $30 million to $40 million is what the government is pouring out for every 15 minutes of the G8 and G20 meetings. Thirty to forty million dollars is also the ceiling for corporate liability if Canada were to suffer a catastrophic oil spill. Meanwhile, in the Gulf of Mexico, damage from crude oil is estimated at over $3 billion.

Will the minister ensure that it is the oil companies and not the Canadian taxpayers on the hook for a major oil spill in Canada?

Offshore Drilling
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I do not know if people are lying about this issue, or if they are just plain misled, but clearly Canadians are being misled. The requirements for drilling include things like worker safety plans, contingency plans and emergency response plans. The member knows that if she had been listening to the testimony that has been heard at committee, she would know that the safety regime in this country is as good as that in any country in the world.