House of Commons Hansard #54 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was lake.

Topics

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of State of Foreign Affairs (Americas)

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.

As the Prime Minister stated in the House yesterday, Canada deeply regrets the loss of life and the injuries suffered off the coast of Gaza on May 31, and extends sympathies to the families.

In fact, in response to the direct question today, Canada does support a prompt, impartial, credible and transparent investigation into this tragic incident, but at the same time, we call on all states and international bodies not to rush to judgment before all of the information is known.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we got an answer today. We did not get one yesterday. I will therefore press on. The UN Security Council also called for compliance with resolutions 1850 and 1860, which require that humanitarian aid and food flow regularly to Gaza.

Will the Conservative government pressure Israel to comply with the two UN Security Council resolutions?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of State of Foreign Affairs (Americas)

Mr. Speaker, once again, I thank my colleague for his question.

Of course, Canada is concerned about the humanitarian situation facing the people of Gaza, notwithstanding the fact that Gaza is governed by a terrorist entity.

We strongly encourage all parties to work together to ensure that humanitarian aid is delivered to the people of Gaza, but at the same time, Canada understands fully and sympathizes with Israel's legitimate security concerns.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, when asked about the fact that Israel still has not signed the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, the government said we should be more concerned about signatories to the treaty that do not comply with it, practically suggesting that Iran should not have signed this treaty. It is ridiculous.

Will the Prime Minister, who wants a seat on the UN Security Council, promise to demand that countries that have signed the nuclear non-proliferation treaty comply with it and that those that have not signed the treaty, like Israel, sign it?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of State of Foreign Affairs (Americas)

Mr. Speaker, Canada is heartened by the number of states which have indicated they will indeed vote for our candidacy for the non-permanent seat on the Security Council and it is because of the leadership which we will demonstrate at the G8 and G20 conferences.

As my colleague knows, nuclear non-proliferation is one of the three pillars: non-proliferation, disarmament, and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy by all countries, signatories and otherwise.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, by blindly aligning itself with American and Israeli policies, the Conservative government is tying its own hands and too often is prevented from taking a stand. For example, the government described the Israeli army assault as an “incident”.

How can the Conservative government run for a seat on the UN Security Council when it cannot show leadership and demand that all countries comply with international law?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of State of Foreign Affairs (Americas)

Mr. Speaker, indeed, Canada does call on all parties to the conflict in the Middle East to exercise restraint. As recently as three days ago when the Prime Minister of Israel was visiting, Canada has been calling on Israel and the Palestinian authority to continue to work with the United States to return quickly to negotiations toward a comprehensive, durable and lasting peace in the Middle East.

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, as the ecological disaster unfolds in the Gulf of Mexico, the House voted unanimously yesterday to make sure that such a catastrophe could not happen here in Canada. The House instructed the government to conduct immediately a thorough review of all of our laws and regulations regarding the development of unconventional sources of oil and gas, including oil sands, deepwater recovery and shale gas.

It has to be a credible review, independent of the NEB. When will the review begin?

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I would remind the leader of the New Democratic Party that the National Energy Board has started a review of its regulations pertaining to project management and offshore drilling. That announcement was made on May 11. The whole process will be reviewed by an independent regulator with a 50-year history. Let us be clear: no project will be allowed to go ahead in Canada until the board is satisfied that the safety and security of workers will be ensured and that the environment will be protected.

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, members are unanimous. Consultations with all affected stakeholders, both public and private, must be as extensive as possible. The process has to be transparent, and a clear time frame has to be set. The goal is to ensure that Canada has the strongest environmental and safety rules in the world.

When will we get that report? When will consultations begin?

Oil and Gas Industry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, acting diligently, the National Energy Board announced on May 11 that it would be reviewing all its offshore drilling requirements. The public, and indeed everyone, will be invited to provide input. This will be done in an open and transparent manner, as we have said repeatedly. So, I suggest that the leader of the New Democratic Party stay tuned to what is going on at the NEB because consultations are forthcoming. The board is in action mode, here and now.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Jack Layton Toronto—Danforth, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the early 1990s, outgoing Conservative Prime Minister Brian Mulroney got involved with shady deals. Unfortunately, there were brown envelopes stuffed with cash handed over in hotel rooms for services that may or may not have been connected to the Airbus contract.

Revenue Canada gave him a generous tax break on these suspicious payments. Further, to reward him for this unethical behaviour, the Liberal government made a payment of $2.1 million.

The taxpayers want the Mulroney money back. When will that happen?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we had an extensive report tabled just this week that covers hundreds of pages looking into a number of matters. As is appropriate any time we receive a report like that, it is appropriate that various authorities have a look at that, and have a look at those recommendations. As I indicated, the government is prepared to act on recommendations from the appropriate authorities.

International Aid
Oral Questions

June 2nd, 2010 / 2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Frank Valeriote Guelph, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Council for International Co-operation is being left in limbo by the Conservatives. Awaiting what will likely be the end of its funding, it has begun to lay off workers and put its office space up for sale. The head of Oxfam Canada has called this latest ideological cut by the Conservatives “very, very disturbing”.

What can the government not tolerate about constructive criticism and champions of human rights? What does it say about the character of our Prime Minister when those who watch out for the poor of the world have to watch their own backs?

International Aid
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, this government is making sure that its international aid is going to make a difference. It is about the best use of taxpayers' dollars. It is about effectively delivering results for those who are living in extreme poverty.

It is about providing $5.85 billion to UNIFEM, which I announced yesterday, so that it can be out in the field, fighting for the equal rights of women and children. UNIFEM is making sure they have fair access to property and making sure they are represented properly within legal systems. This is the--