House of Commons Hansard #66 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was funding.

Topics

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister wants to spend $13 billion on megaprisons based on made-up statistics on unreported crime. It is no wonder that the government wants to abolish the long census. Facts and numbers are unimportant to the Conservatives.

Canadians are worried about their jobs, their pensions and the economy. Meanwhile, the government recklessly borrowed billions of dollars to give tax breaks to the wealthiest corporations and cut millions in funding for crime prevention programs. Why?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, this has been the Liberal philosophy. The Liberals do not want dangerous criminals in prison but the Liberals want to register guns. They came up with the long gun registry, targeting law-abiding citizens and if they do not register their guns, send them to prison.

What a bizarre criminal justice philosophy: keep dangerous criminals on the street and send hard-working Canadians to prison. That is the Liberal philosophy

Government Advertising
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, while Canadians struggle with rising debt, the Conservatives made an economic decision to install and track exactly 8,587 giant signs. Media reports say each one costs upwards of $8,000 to buy and install.

Since the Conservatives have spent so much effort tracking each sign right down to the square metre where it was installed, can they tell Canadians just how much these signs cost down to the last penny?

Government Advertising
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it is true there are a lot of signs out there and they are not just signs that we will find hanging on a wall or hanging on a signpost. They are signs of recovery, signs of hope, signs of opportunity.

Wherever we travel in the country taxpayers are saying, “What are you spending that money on? Are you sure it is a good investment?” We are being open and transparent. We are seeing the evidence of the man who put the action in the economic action plan, the member for Ottawa West—Nepean, right here.

Government Advertising
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, last year, the Conservatives doubled their advertising expenses to $89 million. A number of the ads looked like advertising for the Conservative Party.

When will the government implement a third-party review process to ensure that government advertising serves the interests of Canadians and not of the Conservative Party?

Government Advertising
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, of course, a lot of advertising goes to advertise things like awareness of H1N1 and so on.

However, it was interesting to read the quote from the Leader of the Opposition who was travelling this summer. He said, “We should prepare for 2017. What I want to see is ribbon cuttings everywhere. I want to see things opening. I want to see big banners”.

There is no doubt about it. He knows how to spend money. Does he know how to spend it wisely? The answer of course is he knows how to spend it because he is going to get it out of taxpayers' pockets.

Our way is to spend it wisely, show Canadians transparently and openly how we are doing it, and that is what we have been doing since the beginning.

Health
Oral Questions

September 20th, 2010 / 2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Patricia Davidson Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government understands the difficulties of Canadians living with multiple sclerosis.

Can the Minister of Health share with the House her latest efforts with respect to research on the possibilities associated with CCSVI?

Health
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, my thoughts go out to all those who suffer from MS.

Our government, with the provinces and territories, is speaking with one voice. At last week's health ministers meetings my colleagues and I agreed on the importance of accelerating research so that families can make informed decisions about the MS treatment options.

We will move as quickly as possible based on the best available science. If the experts advise in favour of clinical trials, our government, working with the MS Society and provinces and territories, will ensure they are fully funded.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canada has lost 250,000 full-time jobs since October 2008. The deadline for economic stimulus spending is March 2011, and some municipalities will be penalized. At the same time, many cities are hoping for federal funding for sports infrastructure. Quebec City is bidding on the 2012 Olympics and wants to bring back the Nordiques. I see that my colleagues have forgotten their jerseys today.

Does the federal government plan to partner with the cities and provinces that want to build new sports and recreation infrastructure, yes or no?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon
B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, many Canadians are proud sports fans. They support their sports teams wherever they happen to be in all regions of this country and that is great to see. It brings not only cultural opportunities but also economic opportunities across the country.

These initiatives are primarily led by private sector interests. In the case of the NHL, these are wealthy owners along with wealthy hockey players who bring us a lot of fun, but they need to take the lead on this. We look forward to any leadership they might show in the private sector as we move forward with this kind of initiative.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, our manufacturing sector continues to get hammered, bleeding off a further 25,000 jobs in August. Right now, we are looking at $60 billion in tax decreases for Canada's most profitable corporations, $15 billion in profits for the banks for the first nine months of the year, but do not worry, they are planning to share it with themselves, $7.5 billion in bonuses for bank executives.

When is the government going to understand that billions for banks does not signal recovery for unemployed Canadians? What concrete measures are planned so that the economy does not stall further?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, first of all, the member opposite should get his facts right. We went through a difficult time in Canada during the recession that came from outside this country.

We did lose almost 400,000 jobs, but as of today we have recovered 430,000 net new jobs in this country. We have recovered more than all the jobs that were lost during the recession. Why is that? Because of sound economic management which is admired around the world.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government says that before investing any money in Quebec City's bid for the Olympic Games, the city must have confirmation that its bid has been selected for the games.

My question is simple: is this still the government's position?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Louis-Saint-Laurent
Québec

Conservative

Josée Verner Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the government has been very clear on this subject. Although we are big professional sports fans, the private sector must take the lead. That being said, if our government is to play a role in funding sports infrastructure within its means, it will do so fairly across the country.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister did not answer the question I just asked.

I will give another example. In 2001, Paul Martin and the current Minister of Finance, who was finance minister at Queen's Park at the time, each gave the City of Toronto $500 million to support its bid for the 2008 Olympic and Paralympic Games, which failed. That is a double standard.

Why is the government refusing to invest in an important multi-purpose project like the Quebec City amphitheatre? This project has received the support of not only Quebec City, but also the Government of Quebec.