House of Commons Hansard #67 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was code.

Topics

Alzheimer's
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Ujjal Dosanjh Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, today is Alzheimer's Day. The theme for the 2010 campaign is “Dementia. It's time for action!”.

Dementia affects 20% of seniors by the age 80. Dementia affects over 40% of seniors by the age of 90. Today, 500,000 Canadians are living with dementia. Every five minutes, another Canadian develops dementia. In 20 years, the total number of people living with dementia in Canada will be 1.1 million.

Dementia costs Canada $50 million a day. In a few years, it will triple. Imagine not just the financial cost but the human cost of doing nothing or not much. We need a plan to support the millions of Canadians living with this disease and their families who care for them. We need more investment in dementia care and better treatment.

A national strategy for dealing with dementia must be a priority for our country. Alzheimer's Day reminds us that we need to act, and act quickly.

The Economy
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Tilly O'Neill-Gordon Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, the economy remains the number one priority of Canadians and of our Conservative government. Our government knows that Canadians' long-term prosperity is driven by the creativity, the ingenuity and common sense of entrepreneurs. We stand up for small-business owners and hard-working families across this country.

At a time when our economic recovery is still uncertain, Canadians can count on this government and the Prime Minister to continue to focus on maintaining job security and prosperity for Canadian families and communities.

In the coming months, our actions will be guided by three bold principles: supporting job creation and economic growth; keeping our communities, streets, and families safe from terrorism and crime; and mapping a path to economic recovery to ensure jobs and prosperity for all Canadians for years to come.

We urge all members to work with us during the parliamentary session to show that we can work together to deliver for Canadians.

Pensions
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, Robin Hood took from the rich to give to the poor. However, our Prime Minister and his merry men have turned that legend on its head. They take from the poor and give to the rich.

Bank profits for the first three quarters of 2010 were in excess of $15 billion. The Conservatives' tax cuts have fattened that number by $645 million. That is $645 million that went to the wealthiest corporations, while the poorest seniors are being robbed.

Incredibly, the measly cost of living increase on CPP benefits for Canada's must vulnerable seniors, those who are collecting the GIS, is being clawed back. When their CPP goes up, that modest increase is treated as additional income. For many, that means their GIS entitlement goes down in the following year, leaving this country's poorest seniors with less money in July than they received from January to June.

This House unanimously passed the NDP plan for comprehensive pension reform. We are still waiting for its implementation. However, let us at least live up to the spirit of that plan by ensuring that retirees get more money. Clawing back pension increases makes a mockery of the very purpose of keeping pace with inflation.

At a minimum, let us ensure that Canada's most vulnerable seniors are not being robbed to pay for tax cuts for the rich.

The Economy
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Steven Blaney Lévis—Bellechasse, QC

Mr. Speaker, the economy is our top priority, and Canada's economic action plan, which the Bloc Québécois shamefully rejected, is working for all Canadians.

We are lowering taxes for families and businesses, while infrastructure projects are creating jobs to stimulate economic growth in big cities and small towns throughout Quebec and Canada.

Thanks to our Conservative government, Canada's leadership is the envy of the world. For the third year in a row, the World Economic Forum has recognized Canada's banking system as the strongest in the world.

Furthermore, the IMF and the OECD have said that Canada will lead the G7 in economic growth this year and next.

In addition, since July 2009, Canada's economic action plan has helped create 430,000 jobs. The recovery does remain fragile, however. As we begin a new session, jobs and economic growth are our top priorities.

Quebeckers and Canadians can count on their Conservative members and our government to live up to their expectations.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Marc Lemay Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, last March, I presented a petition to increase the budget allocated to education for first nations. What has the government done since then? Nothing. It has promised to repeal sections of legislation that allow Indian residential schools to be created and aboriginal children to be taken from their community, but that is not going to have any impact on funding for those communities.

The Conservative government is continuing to freeze the education funding indexation rate for aboriginal communities at 2% a year, even though demographic growth is between 6% and 7%.

That is why this week, the first nations are on Parliament Hill to remind the government once again that first nations education is in crisis. It is time for the government to take action.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal Party of Canada firmly believes that one of the best ways to improve the quality of life of the first nations is to educate aboriginal young people. Therefore, we must work with the governments of the first nations, the Métis, the Inuit and the provinces and territories to achieve this objective.

Unfortunately, the Conservative government has not shown any leadership on this important issue. It cut funding for the First Nations University, got rid of the historic Kelowna accord, and refused to endorse the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. All Canadians, not just aboriginal peoples, will be affected.

We intend to invest in people in order to build the best educated and most skilled workforce in the world. Thus, every Canadian, including aboriginal peoples, must have every opportunity to succeed through education and training.

Firearms Registry
Statements By Members

September 21st, 2010 / 2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow MPs in this House will vote on whether to keep the wasteful and inefficient long gun registry.

On this side of the House we have listened to our constituents, and they know that we stand with them. But this is not the same for those Canadians who are being represented by the Liberals and their coalition partners.

Listen to the political flip-flop.

The NDP public safety critic admitted that the long gun registry is flawed. On April 21, 2009, he told this House, “There are some disadvantages to registration, and in fairness, those should be pointed out as well. It imposes a regulatory burden on legitimate, responsible and law-abiding gun owners”.

The member for Vancouver Kingsway goes on to say, “Registration systems have put a particularly onerous duty on first nations, hunters and trappers, and those who make their living off the land”.

We could not agree more and urge all NDP MPs to listen to their public safety critic, not the Liberal coalition, and to vote to scrap the wasteful and ineffective long gun registry.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, this government has signed untendered contracts to buy planes and is spending billions on prisons. It wasted $1 billion on the G8 and G20 summits, and as we heard today, it has tripled its advertising spending to an unheard-of $130 million.

Can the government explain its wasteful spending record to Canadian taxpayers who are struggling to make ends meet?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I say to my friend, the leader of the official opposition, that this government, as part of our economic action plan, has had an important responsibility to be open and to be transparent about the various programs that are part of the economic action plan. We have done that in every part of the country, and I can say directly to the leader of the Liberal Party that one of the reasons why advertising expenses rose was that we had to spend some $24 million on the H1N1 vaccine campaign, something that was not just important, but was a huge success, thanks to the hard work of the Minister of Health.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, that does not get us to $130 million, number one, and number two, 94% of Canadians thought that was a total waste of money. It is not just a waste of money, it is a question of priorities. The government's priorities are prisons, planes, and publicity. The priorities of Canadians are education, health care, and retirement security.

How is it that the priorities of this government have gotten so out of touch with the majority of Canadians?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, let me say this. The priorities of this government are jobs, hope, and opportunity. The priority of this government has been our economic action plan. The priority of this government is to create jobs in every corner of the country, some 12,000 infrastructure jobs, putting Canadians back to work. That is why, in the past 15 months, we have seen the creation of some 430,000 net jobs. That is the best in the OECD.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore
Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, just ask whether the jobs that have come back are worth the jobs we lost. That is number one.

This is a spend and borrow government. It has gotten us into a $54 billion hole. It is about to borrow $6 billion to give breaks to large corporations. The question Canadians are asking is this: how can we trust a spend and borrow government to dig us out of the hole that it dug us into?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, Canadians can trust this government, the Prime Minister, and the Minister of Finance to stand up for a strong Canada, a Canada creating jobs, hope, and opportunity. If Canadians want to know why they can trust this government, it is that this government has maintained the confidence of that party for the past two years.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Beauséjour, NB

Mr. Speaker, without a competitive bidding process in Canada, the Conservatives chose to borrow $16 billion for stealth fighter aircraft. They chose not to determine if there was a better option, one that would meet Canada's defence needs and better serve taxpayers. By choosing to pay the highest price possible for these stealth aircraft, the Conservatives renounced savings that could have been used for the priorities of Canadians, such as health care and retirement security.

Why have the Conservatives decided to disregard taxpayers and disregard the priorities of Canadian families?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, first, I want to welcome the member opposite to his new critic portfolio. I look forward to working with him on important defence matters. I look forward to finding some level of co-operation, as our fathers did before in this place. I would also like to answer his question.

With respect to the priorities of Canadians, yes, health care, yes, the economy, and yes, many other things, but yes, security. Outfitting the men and women of the Canadian Forces with the best possible equipment, to protect them, to allow them to do their jobs, is an important priority for Canadians. These jets will do just that. This is the best possible jet we could give these members of the Canadian Forces and we intend to make it available to them.