House of Commons Hansard #67 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was code.

Topics

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we launched two new programs in 2008, the education partnerships and first nations student access. These will help first nation students. Most of this is new money. The moneys we put in place through the economic action plan is also achieving major positive results for first nation education.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Wallace Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government is focused on the economy, on jobs and implementing Canada's action plan. The plan is working, creating jobs and promoting growth.

The Liberal Party, however, is out of touch. It talks down Canada's economy and the economic action plan at every opportunity. For Liberals, the only solution is higher and higher taxes.

Could the Minister of Finance please tell us what is wrong with the Liberal plan?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

I would be happy to, Mr. Speaker. Our priority is helping Canadian families, helping Canadian communities and preserving Canadian jobs. That is why we are continuing to implement the successful economic action plan. Canada has created over 430,000 net new jobs since the recession ended.

The Liberals are proposing tax hikes that would wreck our economy. It would kill about 400,000 jobs, according to the experts.

The choice is clear: a Conservative government that creates jobs or a coalition government that will kill jobs.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, many western farmers are facing financial ruin due to severe weather. However, government programs are proving to be useless.

Linda Oliver from Mozart, Saskatchewan, states, “We have had over 1000mm of rain here - over 40 inches - and all I am told is [the government] are monitoring the situation....Agri recovery won't even pay on clover - seeded last year...but drowned out. Is that fair?”

When will the minister and the current government actually help farm families who are in severe financial stress?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, we have done exactly that. Working with the farm groups, the affected provinces and territories, we have come forward with the largest, fastest delivered program ever in the history of the country. We have delivered money to top up crop insurance. That is the first line of defence in a situation like that. Agristability will pay out large dollars this year since we are into a new five-year average, losing 2004 the frost year. Therefore, we are looking forward to getting that money flowing to farmers very quickly.

We know we have done a good job because farm groups are telling us and I would be happy to quote some of them back to the member.

Border Crossings
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Claude DeBellefeuille Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, we constantly have to reassure our American neighbours that Canada has rigorous security measures in order to protect the economy and trade, and now the Conservative government has decided to close two border crossings, one in Franklin Centre and another in Jamieson's Line, both of which are in my riding, and to reduce the hours at three other crossings.

Does the government realize that cutting border services will harm tourism, trade, the economy and local life?

Border Crossings
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, we examine these issues very carefully and we ensure that the money being spent on border crossings is appropriately done. I know CBSA has made certain recommendations and I believe those recommendations are consistent with both the interests of Canadians who access those border crossings as well as continuing to stimulate trade across the border with the Americans.

Census
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, clearly the current government believes it is better to make decisions without the facts. On the census, Conservatives are happy to put reason aside, ignore schools, municipalities and hospitals and forge ahead. This simply is irresponsible and is going to cost more money to the taxpayers.

We have learned that over 90% of all correspondence the Conservatives have received is opposed to their changes. Almost all are from individual Canadians, not academics or other elites who make them scared.

When will the minister listen to Canadians and reinstate Canada's long form census?

Census
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, it probably should not surprise me, but it still does, to hear how quickly and easily members of the opposition, including the NDP, are approving of jail time or large fines for their fellow Canadians who refuse, out of good conscience, to fill out a 40-page questionnaire with very personal information. It is incredible how they will sacrifice the rights of Canadians on this matter.

We on this side have a balanced proposal that gets usable useful data for those who want it and at the same time protects the rights of Canadians. We are proud to make that balance.

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, everyone knows that criminals do not use registered long guns to commit their crimes. We all know that. They use illegal, unregistered guns.

Yet, the Liberal Party and the Bloc Québécois insist on criminalizing honest Canadian and Quebec hunters and farmers.

Could the Minister of Natural Resources explain the government's intentions regarding the long gun registry?

Firearms Registry
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we too support issuing permits for prohibited or restricted firearms. However, we do not want to unfairly target farmers and hunters. There is a worrisome trend on the opposition side, and that is to be more lenient with criminals and harsher with honest citizens.

The leader of the Liberal Party, who claims to be a democrat, should listen to his party members who represent the regions, because they see the unfairness and the inconvenience of this measure for honest citizens.

There is only one party in this House that takes into consideration the interests of the regions, and that is the Prime Minister's party, the Conservative Party.

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Oral Questions

September 21st, 2010 / 3 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, first, I should point out that the actions of the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition appointing me and the member for Ottawa South has seen a significant reduction in the heckling in the House. Those two should get some just reward for their actions on decorum. There is leadership.

Mr. Speaker, there have been consultations and I believe you will find there is unanimous consent of the House for the following motion:

That, notwithstanding any standing order or usual practices of the House, during the debate tonight on the Motion to concur in the Second Report of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security (recommendation not to proceed further with Bill C-391, An Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Firearms Act (repeal of long-gun registry)), the Chair shall not receive any quorum calls, dilatory motions, amendments or requests for unanimous consent; at the end of the time remaining for the debate, or when no member rises to speak, all questions necessary to dispose of the motion be deemed put and a recorded division be deemed requested.

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

Does the hon. government House leader have the unanimous consent of the House to propose the motion?

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security
Committees of the House
Oral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?