House of Commons Hansard #30 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

G8 Summit
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is now 130 days since the Muskoka minister took a dive on accountability of the G8 slush fund.

We now know that Huntsville was green-lighted to blow $30 million in federal money without tenders. We now know that the Muskoka minister got a job for his buddy. We now know that his campaign manager-turned-lobbyist hit up the federal government for millions in grants.

The Auditor General said that the rules were broken and that it was Parliament's job to investigate.

Will the government commit to a full parliamentary investigation to find out how $50 million was diverted into a personal slush fund for the rogue Muskoka minister?

G8 Summit
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it will not come as any surprise to that member or to the House that I categorically reject the premise of the member's question.

What we do know is that I approved 32 public infrastructure projects to support municipal, provincial and airport authority infrastructure in that region.

As the Auditor General has reported, every dollar was accounted for in terms of the municipalities that incurred these infrastructure expenses. The Auditor General has come forward and made reports on how we can be even more accountable and more transparent to Parliament. We have completely accepted her good recommendations.

G8 Summit
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the President of the Treasury Board used a $50 million slush fund to award untendered contracts, give jobs to his friends and build an Olympic-sized arena, gazebos, a media centre that was never used and a campus that students do not go to. Last week, he described himself as the government's chief operating officer. First, that is very telling. Second, now we know why the President of the Treasury Board is not rising: his title has changed.

Now, can the government's chief operating officer stand up and explain himself?

G8 Summit
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, all 32 of these projects had an individual contribution agreement with the municipalities or independent orders of government for which this government has always shown considerable respect. Each contribution agreement requires and sets out expectations and these expectations are expected to be followed.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we suspect that the government's chief operating officer likely followed the lead of the Associate Minister of National Defence. His department just spent—or wasted—$375,000 setting up new offices for assistant deputy ministers. That is the price of a new house for a Canadian family.

While so many people are having trouble making ends meet, how can the minister explain excesses such as planned helicopter rides, the use of the Challenger and renovations that are costing taxpayers an arm and a leg?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, it is unacceptable that any spending not be monitored, well coordinated and justified. In this particular case, the work that has been done was to relocate a number of new employees within the ministry. That coordination needed to be done to facilitate new members to the Department of National Defence, a new work area and new facilities.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Kellway Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, let us look at the government's recent track record on defence procurement.

Costs for Chinook helicopters have gone up by 70%, wasting billions. Untendered contracts for the F-35, costing Canadians untold billions, carry no guarantee of Canadian jobs. Instead of dealing with these issues, the defence department decided to blow $375,000 on office renovations.

Does the Associate Minister of National Defence really think that these problems will be solved by sprucing up the department's offices?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Vaughan
Ontario

Conservative

Julian Fantino Associate Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, we are concerned about all spending of tax dollars, the expenditure of this particular office renovation no less. We treat every dollar entrusted to us by taxpayers with the utmost care and respect.

The Department of National Defence recently refitted the offices of the deputy minister and associate deputy minister and their staff to include them in a single office work area.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Frank Valeriote Guelph, ON

Mr. Speaker, the government is railroading wheat and barley farmers who support maintaining their own single desk marketing and sales arm under the Canadian Wheat Board.

The government is tying farmers to the track by removing their clout and ability to stand up to grain companies and unfair rail prices and transportation costs. It is removing their ability to be price setters and leaving them forced to accept the lowest price possible.

Why will the so-called law and order government, intent on breaking the law, not follow the law set out in the Canadian Wheat Board Act and hold its own plebiscite before it introduces legislation to kill the single desk system?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, what an exciting day for western Canadian farmers to finally hear that legislation will be presented that will give them freedom. I will read what one of the farmers had to say about that. He said, “I have never been more optimistic than I am now to be a grain farmer in western Canada. These are exciting times. I am looking forward to the future and this legislation is well timed. We have been waiting a long time for it, so thank you”.

That is from a western Canadian farmer.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government wants to do away with the Canadian Wheat Board. Will its next victim be supply management? We all know that the government's chief negotiator for the free trade agreement with Europe said in committee that everything is on the table during the negotiations.

How can we be assured that this government will not yield to pressure from the Europeans on the issue of supply management?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, when the minister appeared before the trade committee, he reassured the committee once again that supply management was protected by this government and would continue to be protected by this government.

Research and Development
Oral Questions

October 17th, 2011 / 2:55 p.m.

NDP

Hélène LeBlanc LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the expert panel's report on research and development confirms that the government's innovation strategy is a failure. This government's lack of long-term vision is costing us jobs and reducing our ability to compete internationally. This government must do more to be a leader in innovation, because Canada is only marking time.

When will this government finally help the businesses and researchers that innovate and move Canada forward?

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Cambridge
Ontario

Conservative

Gary Goodyear Minister of State (Science and Technology) (Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario)

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for pointing out that we did receive a panel report today. I want to thank the panel for its hard work and assure the House that I will be considering all the recommendations in that report.

We do want to celebrate with our businesses this week. We want our businesses to do research, develop new products and new markets. What that would mean for Canadians is jobs, better jobs, higher-paying jobs and a higher standard of living, and that is what we want.

Research and Development
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Dan Harris Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is nice to know that the minister knows there is a report, but it would help for him to read it because it would show him that the government's strategy has failed. As countries around the world move forward with new innovations, Canada keeps falling behind.

When will the government stop subsidizing corporate research and start promoting direct investment in R and D like leading countries do? When will it start listening to New Democrats and begin moving Canada forward by adequately funding basic scientific research so our scientists can get results for Canadians?