House of Commons Hansard #27 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was jobs.

Topics

Nova Scotia Aboriginal Male Athlete of the Year Award
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, I stand in the House today to recognize Aaron Floyd Prosper, a 15-year-old Mi'kmaq student from the community of Eskasoni First Nation and a recent recipient of the 2011 Nova Scotia Aboriginal Male Athlete of the Year Award.

Aaron is a grade 10 honours student at Chief Allison M. Bernard Memorial High School and is the son of Floyd and Dawna Prosper. He began playing hockey when he was just four years old with Eskasoni Minor Hockey Association and then he moved on to Cape Breton minor hockey.

Aaron has a passion for drumming and is asked to perform at many events. His presentation of “Making of the Mi'kmaw Drum” won awards here in Ottawa. In addition, Aaron has been competing in golf and kick-boxing tournaments and he plays the piano. He has also developed his own workshop called “Talent is Never Enough”.

Aaron has brought great honour to his family, his friends and community. He is a true testament of hard work and focus, and he is an inspiration to us all.

Champlain Bridge
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, just a few hours ago, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities announced that our Conservative government is committed to building a new bridge over the St. Lawrence, thereby launching the replacement process.

This new bridge over the St. Lawrence is vital to the greater Montreal area and will benefit Canada as a whole. This is excellent news for the many workers from Montreal's south shore who cross the existing bridge every day and currently have to deal with considerable traffic. This is also excellent news for the regional economy: every year more than $20 billion in trade crosses that bridge.

The minister said that we will work with our partners and the private sector to ensure that the construction of the bridge is done at no additional cost to taxpayers. Again, as with so many other matters in Quebec, our Conservative government is getting things done.

Manitoba Election
Statements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Pat Martin Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, last night, the people of Manitoba made history. Not only did the NDP win its fourth consecutive majority government, we won more seats than any party in the province's history. The people of my province voted for leadership they can trust.

After 12 years of NDP, we boast the most affordable hydro rates in the country, the lowest unemployment rates in the country, the cheapest public car insurance in the country, and we have reduced the small business tax from 11% under the Conservatives to zero today. It is no wonder the good people of Manitoba voted to elect a strong, stable, majority social democratic government in the province of Manitoba.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Storseth Westlock—St. Paul, AB

Mr. Speaker, I was pleased to hear that Scott Vaughan, the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, recognized our Conservative government's world-class oil sands monitoring plan yesterday.

Before committee yesterday, Mr. Vaughan confirmed that our government had already acted on the concerns highlighted in his report.

Given the report covered a period ending in mid-2010, it preceded the government taking action with the oil sands advisory panel report, which Mr. Vaughan praised for its ambitious 90-day timetable, while noting that the government has already met that timetable.

This past July, we took the next step by announcing the integrated plan for oil sands monitoring, a real plan that focuses on air quality, biodiversity and water.

Our government is working to ensure Canadians have clean water to drink and clean air to breathe for generations to come. Unlike the NDP, which is willing to sacrifice Canadian jobs, our government will balance the need to protect Canada's environment with the need to protect Canadian jobs.

Taxation
Oral Questions

October 5th, 2011 / 2:20 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' reckless policy of corporate tax cuts has helped gut our country's manufacturing sector. The Conservatives do not mind helping profitable oil companies and the big banks just love the handouts, but there has been no benefit for the manufacturing sector, and now we have lost hundreds of thousands of good jobs. Nowhere is this more evident than in Ontario, with even Mr. Hudak saying as much.

Will the Prime Minister wake up, see the evidence and cancel his next round of pointless corporate tax giveaways?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the government has been lowering taxes of all kinds for businesses, families and individuals. It is one of the reasons that Canada has a far better job creation record than most countries.

There are measures right now before the House of Commons to give specific tax allowances and specific tax breaks to the manufacturing sector. I would call on the NDP to support those and stop opposing good things for Canada's manufacturers.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, those tax breaks to the big corporations are not working. The economic plan of the government is a failure. Jobs are not being created, pensions are not being protected and the stock markets are falling. This is a recipe for another Conservative recession and yet the Prime Minister is stubbornly ignoring the evidence and will not change his ways.

The fact is that two million Canadians are looking for jobs. Why are they not the priority instead of the big banks?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we are concerned about Canadians out of work, which is why job creation is our priority and why we have the results to show for it.

What I do not understand is that when we put job creation measures before the House, such as the new tax credit for new hires and incentives for manufacturers, why the NDP, which apparently has no economic ideas at all to propose, just simply stands in the way and votes against these things for Canadian families.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' industrial and fiscal policies have benefited the big oil companies and hurt manufacturing industries, especially in Ontario, where hundreds of thousands of jobs have been eliminated in this sector. The way in which the they are developing the oil sands, without including the environmental costs, has thrown our economy out of balance by artificially inflating the value of our dollar and hurting our exports. Workers in the manufacturing sector have been hit hard by the bad decisions of the Conservatives.

When will they restore the balance and put people back to work? That is a concrete suggestion.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, unemployment clearly remains a difficult problem, but this country's job creation record is better than that of many other countries because of this government's economic action plan. The House of Commons has before it proposals that would create jobs: a tax credit for new hires and tax reductions for businesses and manufacturers.

I do not understand why the NDP opposes these proposals, which will greatly assist our businesses and our families.

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities made a false comparison. The Autoroute 25 Bridge was completely new infrastructure in a location where there had never been a bridge before. The Champlain Bridge, on the other hand, is an existing vital artery for a city of four million people, the second-largest city in Canada and the gateway to the Maritimes.

From now on, hundreds of thousands of workers will have to pay to cross when crossing is currently free. Why?

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, this bridge is a major asset for the country, and the commitment that the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities made today to build a new bridge is excellent news. The manner in which we will proceed with our partners and the private sector will ensure that the construction does not result in additional costs to taxpayers. That is what he is seeking.

The government's preferred option to ensure viable infrastructure for future generations currently involves tolls and a public-private partnership.

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is funny. Every time I hear the Conservatives talking about a public-private partnership, I get the impression that they really mean a partnership that will line the pockets of the private sector or one that will make the public pay.

Hundreds of thousands of people will pay out of their own pockets for a toll bridge when it costs nothing to cross the existing bridge. The government needs to tell the public why.

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, the mayor of Montreal said:

In 2011, the development of any road infrastructure must provide sustainable and effective solutions in terms of mass transit. I also argued in favour of implementing a toll system in order to fund the bridge and speed up its construction.

I could also quote Michel Leblanc, Françoise Bertrand, the Conseil du patronat du Québec and others. We understand that the NDP does not do business with the private sector; perhaps it hates doing so. But we want to keep our promises and ensure that sustainable infrastructure is built for Canada's future generations.

Champlain Bridge
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is no bridge and no plan. All we have is an announcement. There is a difference. The problem we see is that the Government of Quebec was not there for the announcement, and if there is a public transit aspect, it is absolutely essential to have the full co-operation of the Province of Quebec.

How does the Prime Minister explain this off-the-cuff announcement, which has nothing to do with a real plan or a real bridge?