House of Commons Hansard #27 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. Minister of Agriculture.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, there is a growing body of evidence that what is lacking on the Prairies is value-added industries.

The member should probably join with the rest of the producers and processors in western Canada looking for ways to promote the farm gate and actually add value to it, instead of the political stunts that he prefers. They are just not performing well at all.

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, the port of Churchill and northern Manitobans will also feel the hit from the attack on the Wheat Board.

Farmers, workers and Canada's only deep water Arctic seaport are being sacrificed for the government's ideological agenda against the Wheat Board.

When will the government admit its move will hurt Canadians? Will it listen to Manitobans who yesterday overwhelmingly voted for a fourth-term majority NDP government which ran on saving the Canadian Wheat Board?

Canadian Wheat Board
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, we recognize there are a number of issues that need to be worked out.

The Wheat Board is claiming credit for certain things it has never really had its finger on the pulse of.

Having said that, we are buoyed by the fact that the major farm group in Manitoba, Keystone Agricultural Producers, is working with us on building a strong future.

I prefer to work with the farmers of Manitoba than an NDP government that has gone past its best before date.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the environment commissioner has again reported on the abject--

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Edmonton—Strathcona has the floor. Order.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the environment commissioner has again reported on the abject failure of the government to require industry to assess the cumulative impacts of the oil sands on air, water, fish and wildlife.

Contrary to the recent outrageous comment by the Minister of Natural Resources that northern Alberta is uninhabitable, this area has long sustained first nations and Métis peoples.

Is anyone in the government willing to step up to the plate, restore the honour of the Crown and ensure aboriginal and treaty rights are not further abrogated?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, my department officials have been working closely with the communities that are near the Athabasca oil sands to make sure the aboriginal interests are accommodated. Along with industry we have entered into many co-operative and collaborative arrangements. We continue to do that and we think that this is a good working arrangement.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the commissioner also criticized the government for basing decisions about the oil sands on incomplete, poor, or non-existent environmental information.

The Alberta government has finally agreed to help finance a long overdue health study for at least two of the impacted aboriginal communities. Last I checked, this is a clear federal responsibility.

How does the government justify more tax breaks for the polluters while turning its back on aboriginal communities?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we are well aware of the work that the Alberta government has entered into. We think this is a good thing. This is a shared responsibility in many respects. We continue to work on a trilateral basis with the province and aboriginal groups. We think this is a good move forward.

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

John Carmichael Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, on July 22 our government pledged $50 million in additional support to those suffering from famine in the Horn of Africa, bringing Canada's total commitment to $72 million. At that time, the minister also announced that our government would match eligible donations from Canadians until September 16.

Would the minister give the House an update on what our government is doing to help those affected by the humanitarian crisis in East Africa?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Durham
Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, the member is quite right. Canada is doing its part to help the 13 million affected in East Africa.

Canadians again have shown their compassion and generosity. Individual Canadians have donated over $70 million to Canadian organizations. As promised, the government will match their generosity through the African drought relief fund. This brings our government support to $142 million to provide needed food, medicine, nutrition and clean water.

The Environment
Oral Questions

October 5th, 2011 / 2:45 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, as of last month, the Arctic Ocean's layer of ice had never been so thin. In his report, the environment commissioner said that the government's so-called action plan is not working. Programs are being cut and critical information is lacking. Climate change is a reality, but the government is in denial.

In three years there have been three reports and three ministers, but no action. Why?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, our government complies fully with the reporting requirements of the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act, but there is no obligation in this act for financial reporting.

The Government of Canada reports to Parliament on all expenditures related to climate change, for example, through individual departmental performance reports.

We will not file redundant reports. We will protect the environment and Canadians' hard-earned tax dollars. That is what we were elected to do.