House of Commons Hansard #45 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was senate.

Topics

National Addictions Awareness Week
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to draw attention to National Addictions Awareness Week, which is currently being observed throughout Canada. An increasing number of Canadians are suffering from addictions, which have devastating consequences for the individuals and their friends and families.

I would like to talk about the Portage organization, which has 10 centres across Canada. Since its establishment in 1970, Portage has helped tens of thousands of people to take back control of their lives through different programs. Recently, Portage acknowledged the success of almost 350 people in Quebec who completed its program or maintained a positive, drug-free lifestyle for one year.

I want to congratulate them. Their determination is proof that, with the necessary help, it is possible to overcome the demons of drug addiction. Kudos also to the entire Portage team for its contribution to Canadian society.

Canadarm
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Marc Garneau Westmount—Ville-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the International Space Station would not exist today without a significant contribution made by Canada. Of course, I am referring to the robotics used to assemble the station. Canada is famous for its expertise in space robotics, in particular the Canadarm, which is turning 30 this week.

I had the privilege and the pleasure of operating the Canadarm on two shuttle missions, once to capture a satellite and once to add a very large piece to the space station. I cannot tell members the pride I felt but I know that all Canadians felt the same pride watching this exquisitely precise performance of this incredible technology.

Everyone was nervous when it first flew 30 years ago. Designed and tested in gravity, would it work in weightlessness? They need not have worried. It behaved flawlessly from the very beginning of its long and distinguished life.

Let us all honour those very clever Canadians who designed and built the Canadarm.

Canadian Wheat Board
Statements by Members

November 14th, 2011 / 2:10 p.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Wheat Board chairman, Allen Oberg, and his seven directors continue to push their irresponsible, scorched earth policy.

Early reports suggest that their most recent ad campaign is already costing western Canadian grain farmers a whopping $1.4 million. This is in addition to the $100,000 they are spending on a reckless and baseless lawsuit in an attempt to keep their draconian monopoly.

Mr. Oberg is doing a great disservice to the farmers and staff he claims to represent by refusing to work with us to give the Canadian Wheat Board the best chance to succeed in an open market.

Not only does Parliament have the right to change legislation, our government has a responsibility to deliver on the promises we made to Canadians. By playing fast and loose with farmers' hard-earned dollars, Mr. Oberg is highlighting the need for Bill C-18 to be passed by this House as soon as possible.

While Mr. Oberg and other directors choose to punish farmers based upon their province of residence, our government will ensure western Canadian grain farmers receive the marketing freedom they want and justly deserve.

Canada Elections Act
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Pierre-Luc Dusseault Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative Party is guilty of breaking the law. It is guilty of election fraud to the tune of $1.3 million. But under the agreement that was negotiated, two Conservative senators and two high-ranking Conservatives will avoid trial and potential prison time. Since the charges were laid against high-ranking Conservatives, the provinces will not have to foot the bill for costly trials and prison stays. Yes, the Conservative Party is guilty.

It is reminiscent of when the Minister of Public Safety pleaded guilty to breaking election laws but managed to avoid trial and potential prison time.

For any other Canadian, the rules are clear: if one does the crime, one does the time. However, if the person is a Conservative insider and he or she does the crime, the Conservatives will pay the fine. It is shameful and just more proof that, under the Conservatives, friends and insiders get all the breaks while Canadian families get left behind.

New Democratic Party of Canada
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Jay Aspin Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, the NDP is disunited on fairness of the shipbuilding process, merit-based selection of Supreme Court judges and marketing freedom for western Canadian farmers. A leadership candidate proposes mergers with the Liberals. Another leadership candidate disagrees with the NDP's constitutional position and the placeholder leader changed the NDP's long-standing position on democratic representation.

When two Thunder Bay NDP MPs voted to end the ineffective and wasteful long gun registry, their placeholder leader took harsh disciplinary measures to silence them.

The Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters called these disgraceful actions “an affront to the parliamentary system”.

The NDP punishes MPs who speak for their constituents while it rewards MPs who break their word.

This is yet another worrying example that the ineffective, disunited NDP is not fit to govern.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, until now Canada has been excluded from the trans-Pacific partnership trade talks largely because of our insistence on protecting our dairy and poultry industries.

The Prime Minister has a poor record as a negotiator, but now he says that the United States wants us in the talks.

I would like to know, what has changed? What will Canada give up in order to be allowed into the trans-Pacific partnership trade talks?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, we have formally expressed an interest in our willingness to work with the trans-Pacific partnership.

Having said that, all countries approach these negotiations with a view to protecting their interests, as Canada certainly will. Therefore, Canada's approach to the TPP will not be different with respect to the European Union free trade negotiations. Of course, this includes our interest in defending and promoting our specific interests in the economy, including supply management.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, any trade agreement must first and foremost help to develop our communities, particularly communities that depend on agriculture. In June, the government was very clear: it was going to defend the supply management program.

The question now is: will the Conservatives take the same approach that they used with the Canadian Wheat Board and try to do away with the supply management program for poultry, eggs and dairy products?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, once again, we have been clear: Canada's approach will not be different in these negotiations from its approach in the European Union negotiations. I repeat: we have officially expressed our willingness to work with the trans-Pacific partnership, but all countries approach these negotiations with a view to protecting their interests.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, in this time of economic crisis, improving trade with the APEC countries must be a priority, but the Conservatives must not repeat the mistakes of the past. Canada must insist that strict environmental standards, respect for human rights—which is a priority—and respect for workers' rights be central to any new trade agreement.

Given the Conservatives' track record in this regard, what assurance can the government give that the trans-Pacific partnership will make these rights a top priority?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Central Nova
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, it is clear. Each time, our country has protected the interests of Canadians. Our Conservative government is concentrating on job creation for Canadians and on economic growth. That is our government's priority.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, 72,000 Canadians lost a full-time job last month. The Minister of Finance reacted by increasing employment insurance premiums.

Families are unable to pay their bills now. It is not reasonable or smart to eat into the paycheques of workers in the middle of an economic crisis while lowering the taxes of large corporations.

Why is this government insisting on dipping into the pockets of Canadians rather than helping them to find work? Canadians want jobs, and the government should be working to find jobs for Canadians.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, I guess that outlines the difference between this government and the NDP. We recognized a long time ago that Canadians want jobs. That is why we put in place an economic action plan that actually placed jobs in front of Canadians. We put stimulus money into the economy that helped provide jobs and infrastructure.

However, every time we bring something forward that helps the unemployed; for example, extending EI, the NDP votes against it. The EI hiring credit in the last budget, the NDP voted against that as well.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, it looks like the Conservatives have not even seen the most recent job figures: 72,000 full-time jobs evaporated last month because of Conservative inaction. Also, they have blown their own deficit forecast yet again. The government has no plans to create jobs. It sounds an awful lot like a repeat of 2008 to me. That means Canadian families are going to pay the price.

The question is very simple. When will the out of touch government get to work, so that Canadians can get back to work? We lost 72,000 jobs last month. Get to work.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, I wish that hon. member would have shown the same passion and voted with the last three budgets that actually put in place something that helped Canadians.

It is a little late to the game to say that we should do something about increasing Canadian jobs. Our economic action plan did just that.

There are 600,000 more Canadians working today than there were at the end of the recession and 81% of those are full-time jobs. That matters to those people.