House of Commons Hansard #45 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was epilepsy.

Topics

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we were disappointed with the delay in the Keystone pipeline which obviously results from U.S. domestic political considerations. We have consistently said the pipeline would create thousands of jobs in Canada and billions of dollars in economic activity.

While we remain hopeful the project will eventually be decided on its merits, we will continue to ensure that markets are open outside North America.

On my trip to Asia, the reception was--

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Nickel Belt.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle Nickel Belt, ON

It must have been a really good reception, Mr. Speaker.

It is clear that Europe and the United States do not want our oil, but the government says that that is no problem and that it will sell our oil elsewhere, and why not to China. This government has no vision for our economy and is putting all its eggs in one basket.

Instead of selling raw bitumen to China, why does this government not find ways to refine Canadian oil here in Canada?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the member does not understand that Canada does not have the oil refining capacity and that it costs billions of dollars. When I visited China and Japan, the reception was very good. Canada has an excellent reputation. That is why they want to continue to invest in Canada. They are very interested in our natural resources.

Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the past month the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister has been called out by the Canadian judiciary, the Ethics Commissioner, the bar association, but now the senior law clerk of the House of Commons is warning that his behaviour at committee is an interference with the independence of the courts that is both unconstitutional and “unlawful”. Either the government respects the constitutional limits of Parliament or it does not.

I have a simple question. Will the government rein in this rogue member, yes or no?

Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, our government and the member for Peterborough were elected to look out for taxpayers. That is what he has been doing. He deserves the applause of the House on all sides for standing up for taxpayers. That is what he has done.

The CBC receives a lot of money from taxpayers. Our government believes that the CBC, the Wheat Board, and other organizations, have to be accountable for the money they receive from taxpayers. That is what the member for Peterborough has been fighting for. That is what we will continue to pursue with all government departments and agencies, including the CBC.

Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, we are talking about interfering in the independence of the courts. The parliamentary law clerk clearly said that the member for Peterborough violated Parliament's constitutional boundaries. He is turning the committee into a circus and his request for documents is unlawful.

Is the attack on the CBC also an attack on the independence of Canadian courts?

Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, we are talking here about accountability and the responsibility of the CBC to be in tune with its needs and to be open to the public about the money it receives from taxpayers.

That is what the Parliamentary Secretary is doing and that is what our government promised to Canadians during the last election campaign. We are asking for the CBC's receipts because it must be accountable. It was the same with our Bill C-2, under the former government. The CBC must show taxpayers that it will act responsibly with the money it receives from them.

Campaign Financing
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Jack Harris St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, last week the Conservative Party of Canada pleaded guilty to exceeding campaign spending limits, failing to report election expenses, and violating the Canada Elections Act. Despite being found guilty, the Conservatives are calling it a victory. Plea bargaining and paying the maximum possible fines so that Conservative Party operatives do not get thrown into prison is not vindication. It is contemptible.

When will the government stand up for election spending rules and get tough on the rule breakers in the Conservative Party?

Campaign Financing
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I have a document from Elections Canada which says:

The Contracting Party acknowledged acts that contravene section 405.21 and constitute an offence under paragraph 497...of the Canada Elections Act.

The contracting party in this Elections Canada document is the New Democratic Party of Canada.

Campaign Financing
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, anyone can see the difference between trying to respect a man's final wishes and trying to steal an election, as the Conservative Party did in 2006.

On August 30, the Privy Council summoned 200 civil servants to a meeting, supposedly to talk about budget cuts. But when they arrived, surprise, they found out it was a party organized to say goodbye to Dimitri Soudas, the Prime Minister's former director of communications .

Is this government capable of making the distinction between the public service and partisan politics?

Campaign Financing
Oral Questions

November 14th, 2011 / 2:35 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member had the opportunity to apologize on behalf of his party for not complying with the Canada Elections Act. In the document I have here, the New Democratic Party admitted to breaking the law. There is good news for the Conservative Party: all of the Conservatives who were accused were cleared following the agreement that was reached last week.

Campaign Financing
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, not only do the Conservatives do as they please with the public service, as we have seen in the past, but now they are also using Parliament Hill as a private meeting room to honour party insiders or to organize an event for the Conservative Albany Club. And who will be the next guest of honour? The person responsible for cutting $4 billion in public services, the President of the Treasury Board. It makes no sense, it oversteps all boundaries, when members use Parliament to raise money for party insiders.

Why do the Conservatives continue to believe that they do not have to follow the same rules as all other Canadians?

Campaign Financing
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement President of the Treasury Board and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, I am glad the hon. member raised the issue of the Albany Club because I would like to make a bit of an advertisement for the NDP. Apparently there is a fundraising party for one of the NDP's leadership candidates, Mr. Topp, at the Albany Club. I guess it is okay for New Democrats to use the Albany Club, but not for us.

Having said that, I would be happy to refer this matter to the Ethics Commissioner.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

Frank Valeriote Guelph, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is running out of ways to hide his famed allegiance to supply management while he paints himself into a corner.

Despite recent assurances, this weekend the Prime Minister announced his desire for membership in the trans-Pacific partnership, an organization which has been clear in its opposition to our valuable supply management system.

In light of this announcement, I have a simple question for the government. Has it put the elimination of supply management on the table in exchange for membership in the trans-Pacific partnership, yes or no?