House of Commons Hansard #55 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government's position makes no sense, whether from a legal, moral or scientific perspective. By opting out of Kyoto, Canada is cutting itself off from the rest of the world. Thus, it is sure to be left out of important decisions concerning the future of the planet. The Conservatives prefer to play by themselves in their oil-sands box. Why?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

On the contrary, Mr. Speaker.

Canada is finding that a good number of countries are moving to our position.

Canada is working toward a single new international climate change regime that will include all major international emitters, both developed and developing countries.

At the same time, Canada continues to pursue our targets of reducing greenhouse gases by 17% by 2020.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

On the contrary, Mr. Speaker.

That was not an answer. The truth is that Conservative inaction on environment is killing Canadian jobs. Now the government is trying to change the channel by re-announcing its failed clean air agenda. The irresponsible government is making us a laughingstock internationally.

Why will Conservatives not come clean with the world, why will Conservatives not come clean with Canadians, and why will they not admit that Canada is pulling out of Kyoto?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for her lob question. It gives me a chance to say that I am extremely pleased to inform all of my hon. colleagues that we have renewed the clean air regulatory agenda.

We will provide $600 million over the next five years in scientific research, monitoring, modelling, regulation, and enforcement required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other toxic pollutants.

Our government can balance both environmental stewardship and protecting the economy.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the government wants to be honest, straightforward and transparent, and that is what leads me to ask a very simple question.

If it is the intention of the Government of Canada to renege on a treaty that was ratified by the Parliament of Canada, why would the Government of Canada not say so now? Why would it not just bring it forward for debate in Parliament now? Why not do it before it goes through the charade of participating in the conference in Durban? Why such a double standard?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, talking about honesty, let us not forget that under the Liberals Canada's GHG emissions increased by 27% to 33% over Kyoto targets. Under the Liberals, Canada's total carbon dioxide emissions increased by 28 points per capita.

Our government is balancing the need for a cleaner and healthier environment by protecting jobs and economic growth. The Kyoto protocol does not include major emitters like China and the United States, and therefore will not work.

We remain committed to our targets to reduce emissions by 17%—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Toronto Centre.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, now that the minister is talking about jobs, let us talk about jobs.

The real rate of unemployment today in Canada is 10%, which means that there are two million unemployed in Canada, people who are discouraged, who have stopped looking for work, and who are actually out of work. It is two million people.

I would like to ask the minister a simple question. Why is it that the only initiative that the government is planning to take on January 1, 2012 is a middle class tax increase? How can the government possibly justify that when there are two million unemployed Canadians?

Employment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, our economic action plan is working. Close to 600,000 net new jobs have been created since 2009.

I must remind the House that the Liberals refused to support our budget. They walked away from the family caregiver tax credit, the children's arts tax credit, the volunteer firefighters tax credit, tax relief for the manufacturing sector, a tax credit for small businesses that creates jobs, and making the gas tax fund permanent.

This is what the Liberals walked away from.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, this government does not realize how serious the unemployment problem is. And at the same time, it is guilty of excessive spending.

The government is wasting money on baubles and trinkets. The Minister of Foreign Affairs spent $6,000 to replace Pellan paintings with portraits of the Queen. Furthermore, he spent $55,000 on flags for the diamond jubilee, completely ignoring the real concerns of Canadians.

How can the government justify such excessive spending on baubles and trinkets?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this government strongly believes in supporting and recognizing Canadian history. It strongly believes with supporting and acknowledging the head of state of Canada, and certainly has made a number of initiatives in this regard. We think these are good things for Canada and we strongly support them.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

November 28th, 2011 / 2:25 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is holding closed door border security negotiations with the U.S. and Canadians deserve to know what is on the table.

Is it iris scans? Is it longer waits at the border? Is it increased fees for businesses and travellers? What is on the table?

Every single time the Minister of International Trade goes to Washington we lose as Canadians. This deal could have major implications for Canadian families. Why is the government keeping Canadians in the dark?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I know this member understands that it is tremendously important that trade across our borders is open, that manufacturing sectors, particularly in southern Ontario and southern Quebec, can get their products back and forth across the border.

Canada is a trading nation, and this government is focused on jobs and the economy like a laser. We want to ensure that we deal with some of the challenges that employers have in getting their goods and services across the border. That is why we are working very closely with the Obama administration on a deal to try to address some of these challenges that are affecting both of our economies.

We are going to continue those discussions and hope to have something in short order.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Brian Masse Windsor West, ON

The truth is, Mr. Speaker, that the Conservatives put us in a major trade deficit. It is costing jobs and it must be stopped. From softwood lumber to buy American, every time the government tries to negotiate a deal with the U.S., Canada comes out the big loser. This time the privacy of Canadians is at stake.

Will the Conservatives finally stop their secret negotiations and tell Canadians what will be sacrificed in this deal? What are the Conservatives willing to give up just to push through this deal with the United States?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, Canadians' right to privacy is something that this government respects and strongly supports but we also strongly support Canadian sovereignty. This is not an issue where Canada needs the United States. This is an issue where we need to work together to ensure that we protect jobs on both sides of the border. That could be more important in no other area of the country than his own constituency of Windsor where auto parts will cross the border some 6 to 12 times in a car manufacturing facility. We want to make it as easy as possible so that the auto workers in Windsor and southern Ontario have the very best economic conditions, not just to succeed but to thrive.