House of Commons Hansard #64 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was representation.

Topics

Afghanistan
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Vancouver Quadra.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, the government promised that it would not stand in the way of countries that want to have an international climate change agreement, but it has done just that and so it has been shamed once again with the fossil of the year award. What the Conservatives do not understand is that by isolating Canada--

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

James Moore Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam, BC

You won it three years in a row.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, order. The Minister of Canadian Heritage wants to answer the question. I am sure he can once the member for Vancouver Quadra is finished.

The hon. member for Vancouver Quadra.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, Conservative members are laughing, but in fact they are going to be losing Canadian jobs because more and more countries are putting trade restrictions on products from countries like Canada that are climate change laggards.

Why are the Conservatives jeopardizing Canadian jobs with their backward approach to climate change? It is shameful.

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, in spite of the Liberal government's inaction on climate change and its record of increased emissions, our government is taking an international leadership stand. We want to have all major emitters sitting around the table and developing an agreement that would see real change in greenhouse gas emission reduction. We have a sector by sector approach that will see domestic action at home. This plan is working.

With regard to the fossil of the year award, the member opposite should know that the real award that counts is that our country sits on top of the G7 with regard to economic growth and job creation.

International Trade
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Djaouida Sellah Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, once again, the government is negotiating an agreement that would be very detrimental to Canadians.

If free trade talks with the European Union go ahead and Canada agrees to extend patent protection for prescription drugs by three years, the price of medications could go up by nearly $3 billion.

The health care system is already struggling and families are having a hard time making ends meet.

When will this government understand that it needs to lower prices and not raise them?

International Trade
Oral Questions

Noon

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, we were successful in signing the comprehensive economic trading agreement with the European Union. There is something that will go up in Canada, without question. There will be a $12 billion annual boost to the Canadian economy, a $1,000 increase to every family's income, and somewhere in the neighbourhood of 80,000 new jobs created.

In the meantime, we will continue to look after Canada's best interests and that includes pharmaceuticals.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

Noon

Conservative

Dick Harris Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, our government has acted responsibly to ensure that residents of Attawapiskat have access to safe and warm shelter for the coming months. We delivered urgent funding to renovate existing homes on the reserve and brought in much needed supplies quickly. What is more, we have provided the chief with a detailed action plan to address the situation.

Could the minister please update the House on what else we are doing for the community to ensure results for residents and Canadian taxpayers?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

Noon

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, our priority is the health and safety of the people of Attawapiskat. Real progress is being made for the residents and Canadian taxpayers.

Today I announced the purchase of 15 modular homes for delivery to the community. I have also ordered a comprehensive and independent audit to identify how money has been spent and what oversight measures have been taken in the last five years.

We want to ensure the people of Attawapiskat get the results they deserve and all Canadians expect.

Official Languages
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Commissioner of Official Languages received 400 complaints last year about the language of work at Air Canada.

Four hundred complaints in one year clearly shows that there is a problem. What is Air Canada doing? The company is moving over a hundred jobs from Montreal to Ontario.

Does the government think it is normal that working in English is becoming the norm at Air Canada?

Official Languages
Oral Questions

Noon

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, Air Canada has official language obligations. According to the act and the requirements that the federal government put in place a long time ago, Air Canada must meet those obligations. Our federal government supports the Official Languages Act, and we expect other organizations that have the same obligations to meet them.

Budget Cuts
Oral Questions

December 9th, 2011 / noon

Bloc

André Bellavance Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government is about to require $8 billion in cuts per year, twice as much as it anticipated in its economic statement presented just one month ago. At the same time, the Conservatives are going to spend $19 billion on prisons, $30 billion on fighter jets, and tens of millions of dollars on monarchist symbols and the commemoration of a forgotten war against the United States.

Will the Minister of Finance get his priorities straight by making cuts in those areas and guarantee that service to the public and transfers to Quebec will not be affected?

Budget Cuts
Oral Questions

Noon

North Vancouver
B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and for Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, this review is focusing on responsible government spending to ensure ongoing value for Canadian taxpayers. This review is also an opportunity to modernize how we do business. Canadians have trusted us to make responsible, reasonable and judicious decisions.