House of Commons Hansard #134 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was seniors.

Topics

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

John McKay Scarborough—Guildwood, ON

Mr. Speaker, that is a wonderful example of reverse Robin Hood.

Sudan just went through a painful and bitter and, some would say, genocidal separation of northern and southern Sudan. KAIROS has been there for years attempting to bring peace and democracy. Just as the people of Southern Sudan embraced peace and democracy, the CIDA minister, at the direction of the Prime Minister, cut KAIROS' funding and KAIROS was forced to close its office and abandon Sudan.

Is this just one more example of what the House leader had in mind when he said that the KAIROS decision was based on helping the poorest of the poor?

International Co-operation
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Newmarket—Aurora
Ontario

Conservative

Lois Brown Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, I reiterate that our government is working to make sure that aid is efficient, effective and focused. We want to ensure that every assistance dollar that we put out there is getting into the hands of those who need it the most.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, the obscene subsidies given to the oil companies by the Conservatives are making taxpayers in Quebec and in the rest of Canada sick. According to a major poll, the majority of people are calling for an end to these tax gifts. Public funds should instead be used to reduce our dependence on oil.

When will this government stop sparing the oil companies? When will it require them to pay their fair share of taxes?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, again, the Bloc Québécois is trying to be divisive on energy policy. It is important to realize that, with the oil sands and its energy resources, Canada can be an energy superpower, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs in this country. It is no secret that the energy sector will help the economy to grow and rebound in the years to come.

Government Spending
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Paule Brunelle Trois-Rivières, QC

Mr. Speaker, in addition to helping the oil companies, which already earn indecent profits, the Conservatives are paying close attention to Ontario automobile manufacturers, which are once again asking for public money. But the Conservatives just gave them $10 billion.

When will the Conservatives realize that it is now Quebec's turn to get its share and that it is time to help the sectors that have too often been abandoned, like the forestry and aerospace industries, or, more generally, Quebec's manufacturing industry?

Government Spending
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, they are completely disconnected. Canada Economic Development is more active than ever in our regions. We have never seen anything like it. In the forestry industry, there was $1 billion for the community development trust, $1 billion for the community assistance fund. The members opposite voted against this and I still hear them screaming. How ineffective can they be? There was $1 billion for pulp and paper green transformation programs, an announcement at Tembec in Matane and an announcement at Domtar in Windsor.

They have the audacity to stroll around their ridings and take credit for our measures, and then they come crying here for no reason.

Davie Shipyard
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, when it comes time to help businesses in the west and Ontario, the Conservative government answers the call. But when it comes to Quebec businesses, the Conservatives create roadblocks.The Superior Court has given the Davie shipyard an extension in order to restructure, but this week the Conservatives amended the largest request for proposals in the history of Canadian shipbuilding to keep the company from bidding.

Why is the government doing everything possible to try to prevent the Lévis-based shipyard from bidding?

Davie Shipyard
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, in fact, the Davie shipyard is welcome to bid on these contracts. We obviously encourage that, but companies that are doing business with the Government of Canada do have to be solvent. That is a requirement to be able to bid on these contracts.

Davie Shipyard
Oral Questions

February 18th, 2011 / 11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives got elected by saying that being in government was the way to be heard. However, the people of Lévis are realizing that their member, a Conservative, is not able to guarantee that Quebec will get its share of shipbuilding contracts. What is worse, they are realizing that he is part of a government that is trying to push Lévis aside and favour the shipyards in Halifax and Vancouver.

Why did the Conservatives amend the request for proposals at the last minute just to hurt this shipyard in Lévis?

Davie Shipyard
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove
Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, this is a very competitive process, but it is an open, fair and transparent process that is under way, and it is arm's length.

Importantly, there is an independent fairness monitor who has just issued a draft report. He has stated that, in his opinion, the decisions that have been made have been made objectively, free from personal favouritism and political influence, and they encompass the elements of openness, competitiveness, transparency and compliance. That is exactly how we will continue to run this process.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, less than two weeks after the Prime Minister claimed border integration between Canada and the United States, he has already failed Canadians twice.

First, President Obama introduced a $5.50 border tax for Canadian travellers, and now in the U.S. Congress a proposed freight fee that would cost importers and exporters over $100 million a day. That is over $40 billion a year. We Canadians are being asked to fix the American deficit.

How did the Conservatives screw this up so fast?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, first let me be very clear that this is a proposed bill and is not law and it is a very bad idea, just like the passenger inspection fee proposed in the draft 2012 budget.

We want to ensure that trade and travel between our countries is easier, not more difficult. We will do everything we can as a government to make sure that happens.

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, they are the ones who want this agreement.

The United States is in the midst of a debt crisis and that is only the tip of the iceberg. Despite this, a Conservative senator is proposing a sort of integration that would include a joint assembly, like the European Union.

Do Canadians want their policies to be dictated by the Tea Party and the Republicans? Will the Conservatives be able to tell the difference between co-operation and assimilation?

Canada-U.S. Relations
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier, we want to ensure that trade and travel between our two countries is made easier, not more difficult. This kind of a tax would have harmful and negative long-lasting effects on trade that is vital to the economies on both sides of the border. It is one of the reasons why our government has been clear that we will not raise taxes in the upcoming federal budget, unlike the hon. member opposite.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Massimo Pacetti Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister continues to show his contempt for Parliament and for the Canadians who send us here by refusing to table the real cost estimates for his Conservative government's crime legislation.

Take, for example, Bill S-9, the auto theft bill. The documents tabled yesterday say it would only cost $600,000. That is only enough money to incarcerate roughly seven more criminals each year. That is not only ridiculous, it is an insult to the intelligence of Canadians.

Why is the government hiding the real cost of this legislation from taxpayers?