House of Commons Hansard #124 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was trade.

Topics

The Economy
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Jonquière—Alma
Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn Minister of Veterans Affairs and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for his question. We are indeed concerned and are working on stimulating the economy and creating jobs. I think the government's economic action plan has produced positive results.

We are also involved in agriculture, of course, and we are trying to encourage Canadians to purchase products made here in Canada. We are currently developing a pilot project, and the results are surprising. When we use the maple leaf logo on a product from Canada, sales increase 70%. It is a way of letting Canadians know whether a product is from Canada, and encouraging them to buy it.

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday, I brought to the government's attention lewd sex toys on the Canada Post website without even as much as an adult content warning. Today we learn that anyone can mail-order a gun.

Canada Post's website offers imitation and replica pistols and rifles that exceed the legal limit. With the click of a button, anyone can purchase these items with ammunition. The NRA may think it is a great idea to mail-order guns, but Canadians do not.

On whose side is the government?

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Yellowhead
Alberta

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, if this is exactly the truth, then I will do a full investigation of it. If they are just toys, then they are just toys. However, if it is something that is not appropriate for a crown corporation to be advertising, then appropriate measures will be taken.

Justice
Oral Questions

February 4th, 2011 / 11:55 a.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, at the beginning of the week, the Leader of the Bloc Québécois and the Prime Minister agreed to work on a bill to abolish parole after one-sixth of a sentence is served, a bill that could have the unanimous backing of the House.

I met with the government House leader and we quickly agreed to two principles regarding this bill: first, that it abolish parole after one-sixth of a sentence is served and, second, that it apply immediately to white collar criminals such as Earl Jones.

Can the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons tell me if we still have an agreement and whether the government has the will to deal quickly with this matter, perhaps at the beginning of next week?

Justice
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, we are always willing to work with members of each political party to advance government bills. The answer to his question is yes, absolutely. Bill C-39 has been before a House committee for eight long years and we are ready to take action. Welcome aboard.

Health
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton Churchill, MB

Mr. Speaker, from this science-skeptic government that rejects the census and denies climate change comes yet another example of Conservative interference.

The government replaced an independent medical review panel looking into the health impacts of salt with industry representatives.

The government is willing to put the health of Canadians at risk. Again, it is listening to industry lobbyists instead of listening to Canadians, even when it comes to the food we put on our children's plates.

Why will the government not leave the medical experts in charge?

Health
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, many Canadians, and particularly those with children, are concerned about the levels of salt in the foods they buy. We understand and we share this concern. That is why we initiated the sodium working group.

We thank the sodium working group for its hard work and we are pleased to endorse its interim goal for sodium reduction. We are working with our provincial and territorial counterparts to implement a strategy for all Canadians.

The advisory committee charged with implementing a strategy includes organizations that are also members of the sodium working group.

Taxation
Oral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Ray Boughen Palliser, SK

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government's low tax plan is building a strong economy for families, but the Liberal leader wants to promote a tax and spend agenda that will stall our recovery and kill almost 400,000 jobs.

The Times & Transcript said:

The Liberal Party is obviously still stuck in its outmoded 1960s style tax and spend mode.

[The Liberal leader] and the Liberal welfare state approach will only worsen the nation's debt and deficit—

Could the finance minister please inform the House of today's job numbers?

Taxation
Oral Questions

Noon

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, Canada created over 69,000 net new jobs in the month of January, over 460,000 net new jobs since the end of the recession, which means we have recovered the jobs lost during the course of the recession.

Too many Canadians are still looking for work. The economic recovery is fragile. Canadian families know that our Conservative government's low tax plan means the creation of more jobs and that the high tax plan of the Liberal Party means fewer jobs in our country.

We need to continue with our job-creating low tax plan, not the dangerous—

Taxation
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

The Speaker Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Mississauga—Streetsville.

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

Noon

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, battery operated sex toys, replica pistols, rifles, ammunition and also unregulated body supplements, are these products Conservatives feel are appropriate to be sold on a government website? These products need to be pulled and the website needs to be shut down until it is reviewed.

How could the minister have allowed this? When will the minister act?

Canada Post Corporation
Oral Questions

Noon

Yellowhead
Alberta

Conservative

Rob Merrifield Minister of State (Transport)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform the House and my hon. colleague that Canada Post has already acted.

If she is finding inappropriate products in her perusing of the Internet, then she should bring them to my attention and we will have Canada Post deal with them.

Agriculture
Oral Questions

Noon

NDP

Alex Atamanenko British Columbia Southern Interior, BC

Mr. Speaker, food prices are spiking all over the world. The UN notes that food prices are already at their highest peak since they started recording them in 1990. Bad weather around the world, higher energy costs and global food riots are set to drive prices up even further. This means seniors and families will soon find their own grocery bills unsustainable.

The Canadian Federation of Agriculture, our party, and many across the country are calling for a strong domestic food policy. Will the government commit to a Canadian food strategy that will help Canadian farmers get affordable food to families who need it?

Agriculture
Oral Questions

Noon

Glengarry—Prescott—Russell
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Lemieux Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture

Mr. Speaker, accessibility to food, and the food supply, are very important. The single best way to ensure we have a steady and safe supply of food is to ensure our farmers remain successful.

By protecting supply management and promoting free trade, we are ensuring that families around the world have access to the food they need.

Our government is working to get farmers a fair return for their products so they can continue to deliver safe, high quality food.

Copyright
Oral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Monique Guay Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, this week, representatives from 90 cultural organizations in Quebec and Canada have denounced Bill C-32 on copyright. They demand major changes to the bill to meet the needs of creators. By introducing a number of exceptions to copyrights, the Conservatives' bill robs creators of their livelihood.

Why is the government attacking the livelihood of artists who, for the most part, receive only a modest income?