House of Commons Hansard #17 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was crime.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Thornhill
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the assumption of my hon. colleague is absolutely false. We are not ending any of our ozone monitoring services or closing down the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre. We are—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

You're firing the guy.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Thornhill, ON

No, we are optimizing and streamlining the way we monitor and we measure ozone to operate more effectively. That is what we were elected to do.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh! Oh!

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

There is far too much noise at the far end of the chamber. I am going to ask all hon. colleagues to listen to the responses. We will have a little order.

The hon. member for Windsor—Tecumseh.

Justice
Oral Questions

September 21st, 2011 / 2:40 p.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the omnibus crime bill was tabled in the House. It—

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

David Anderson Cypress Hills—Grasslands, SK

Say thank you.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Conservatives are in complete denial over there about the serious financial consequences this is going to have to the budgetary process in our country, both provincially and federally. For instance, a single part of the bill will create several thousand plus additional people going into jail that we are going to have to pay for. We all deplore the cost of crime, but we have to have budgetary transparency.

When will one of the two ministers stand in the House and tell us what this bill is going to cost Canadian taxpayers?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is very interesting that the hon. member has now become a fiscal conservative. He is worried about government expenditures. This certainly is something new.

If he is worried, I can assure him that most of the cost of crime is borne by victims. A study in 2008 said that the cost of crime in the country was $99 billion, and 83% was borne by victims of crime.

Why do those members not stand up for victims of crime for a change? Why not make that a priority?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, all the minister and the government are going to do is dump more costs onto that $99 billion figure, which is really questionable.

It is unacceptable that the government is refusing to disclose these costs. This bill will transfer the financial responsibilities to the provinces, which are already short on resources. The provinces are asking for help, but the government is refusing to listen to them.

Can the minister tell us how much this bill is going to cost the provinces? How much?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Niagara Falls
Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I have good news for the hon. member. Provinces right across the country have been supportive of these government initiatives. I can also tell him that just in the last budget an increase of more than $2.4 billion was given to the provinces.

If that individual wants to get on board with this, he should start standing up for victims, people who are the victims of sexual exploitation, do something about drug trafficking in the country and get behind this bill and support it right now.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Charmaine Borg Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the last Parliament, the NDP fought to stop the Conservatives from passing legislation allowing police officers to spy on citizens on the Internet without a warrant. Since this measure is not included in the omnibus crime bill, it is a victory for the NDP and all Canadians.

Can the government confirm that it will, once and for all, heed the experts and the vast majority of the population, who are opposed to surveillance without a warrant?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, outrageous claims like that one, that private communications will be intercepted without a warrant, are a complete fabrication. Our proposed approach of linking an Internet address to subscriber information is on par with the phone book linking phone numbers to an address. What this will not allow for is access to private communications without a warrant.

Our message is clear. If someone wants to commit a crime, we will ensure that laws are in place to ensure that individual is apprehended, and those laws will be done in an appropriate lawful manner.

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Pierre-Luc Dusseault Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, even former Minister of Public Safety Stockwell Day was opposed to electronic surveillance without a warrant.

Can the minister confirm that his government is admitting that this surveillance initiative, an even greater intrusion into the lives of Canadians, has been abandoned? Can he guarantee today that it has been abandoned once and for all?

Justice
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I do not understand where the member is getting his information from. This type of outrageous claim that lawful access would not be appropriately enacted by our government is simply that, outrageous.

The legislation will come. It will provide for appropriate judicial oversight in respect of access to private conversations.

Rather than repeating fabrications, the member might want to come and talk to me about what we are actually planning.