House of Commons Hansard #24 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was senators.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health and Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Mr. Speaker, as I stated earlier, our government believes that spending more money on treatment and support to help people get off drugs is the best investment we can make.

As I also said earlier, we will be reviewing the decision. In fairness, the decision was made two hours ago. I stated that we will be reviewing it, and we will be reviewing it.

Health
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Supreme Court's unanimous ruling is clear. Insite saves lives without compromising public safety. Nonetheless, instead of looking at the facts and scientific studies, this government has spent years in court, at the taxpayers' expense, trying to shut down the Insite clinic.

Will this government finally put aside its ideology and act in the best interest of the health and public safety of all Canadians?

Health
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Nunavut
Nunavut

Conservative

Leona Aglukkaq Minister of Health and Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

Mr. Speaker, as I stated earlier, we are disappointed with the decision but we will comply. I also stated earlier that we believe the system should be focused on preventing people from becoming drug addicts in the first place.

The key pillar of our national anti-drug strategy is prevention and treatment for those with drug dependencies.

I said earlier that we will be reviewing the Supreme Court decision, and we will be doing that.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Scott Simms Bonavista—Gander—Grand Falls—Windsor, NL

Mr. Speaker, I read the news this morning and took delight in what I saw. It was basically a bad Austin Powers movie in which I saw Dr. Evil and Goldmember deciding how to order around government resources.

What possesses the Minister of Foreign Affairs to actually order around Treasury Board as such?

The irony is that the Conservatives just put forward a private member's bill in the House frowning on getting rid of the flag or the word “Canada”, and that is exactly what he just did.

Would the hon. Goldmember please rise and answer to this?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the member and pleased to inform the House that the word “Canada” is on my business card.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

John McKay Scarborough—Guildwood, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is bad enough that the defence minister has become a frequent flyer, abusing both government jets and search and rescue helicopters, but it is completely unacceptable that the Prime Minister uses our courageous men and women of the armed forces to justify that minister's abuse.

Repatriation ceremonies are planned days in advance. It is no wonder he is so “highly regarded”. He is on the frequent flyer program.

How can other ministers manage to use commercial flights, while that minister uses the government fleet as his own personal airline?

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the attendance at ceremonies for the repatriation of soldiers who have fallen in Afghanistan is a serious affair. They are not planned well in advance. Obviously, they are a product of unfortunate events abroad.

The Minister of National Defence has felt it important to attend those ceremonies. The use of government jets by him, notwithstanding that those events did not occur so much in the past under the Liberal government, has still been significantly lower than that of the Liberal government.

In 2004-2005, from August to August, the member for Wascana used government jets for 135 hours. By comparison, in 2010, the entire Conservative cabinet used them for 136 hours, almost exactly the same amount.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. member for Etobicoke North.

The Environment
Oral Questions

September 30th, 2011 / 11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of the Environment suggested that I do my own research instead of listening to the media.

Did the minister do his own research and consult with scientists about the impact of his proposed cuts to ozone research?

If the minister doubts the reports of an international witch hunt in the media, will he either unmuzzle his scientists or at least state that there will be no cuts to the ozone monitoring network?

The Environment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North
Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the minister and myself have said repeatedly in the House that we are not cutting our ozone monitoring program. We will continue to monitor ozone. I invite the member opposite to review those statements as well.

Public Transit
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians spend, on average, 75 minutes a day getting to work, which is 32 working days a year. Days wasted being stuck in traffic is costing the economy $5 billion a year. Traffic gridlock and crumbling roads are all around us and Canada is the only G8 country without a national transit strategy.

Does the minister agree with me that Canada is falling behind on public transit?

Public Transit
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I have to correct the facts. Like all other G8 countries, Canada assigns responsibility for public transit to the provinces and municipalities.

Since 2006, we have invested $5 billion into public transit across Canada, and we will continue to do that.

Public Transit
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is time to get Canada moving. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities, big city mayors, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and the Canadian Urban Transit Authority have all been calling for a national transit strategy.

My bill sets a plan for all levels of government to work together to establish a national vision for public transit.

Will the government get Canada moving and join together with the New Democrats to finally establish a national transit plan?

Public Transit
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government recognizes the value of modern and efficient urban transit. We have been a strong partner with the provinces and municipalities to help them build some of the best transit systems in the world. However, it is not the role of the federal government to tell cities how to run their transit systems.