House of Commons Hansard #69 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was plan.

Topics

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, according to the Minister of Natural Resources, Canadians who publicly express their concerns about the Northern Gateway pipeline are radicals. This is not the 19th century. The radical thing would be to not care about the environment.

When will the minister stop attacking the Canadians and first nations who want to protect the environment and stop taking his orders from the oil lobby?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, there are responsible environmental groups that contribute to the discussion of the use and development of our natural resources. However, there are also some radical environmental groups that are opposed to any development of our resources. They are using the process to delay projects as long as possible with the objective of killing them. We want an independent review that will be open, that will do a scientific analysis, that will hear all the people who have a legitimate view, but thousands of jobs are at stake and the—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Halifax.

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Megan Leslie Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, we really do have a minister for the 19th century. The Minister of Natural Resources fails to understand the impact of Conservative inaction on jobs, on the environment and on future generations. Instead, he attacks people who actually care about the environment. It makes me wonder if the minister actually believes in climate change.

Is the minister a believer or a denier?

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Eglinton—Lawrence
Ontario

Conservative

Joe Oliver Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, since we are into theology, I will tell the House that I believe that no project in Canada should go ahead unless it is safe for Canadians and safe for the environment. However, groups that are opposed to any development of hydrocarbons, groups that say that the oil sands, which represent 1/1000th of global emissions, will result in the destruction of the planet, these groups are not related to science. These groups are radical. These groups fight against—

The Environment
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Edmonton—Strathcona.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, first nations and Métis have called on the government to address impacts of the proposed Gateway pipeline on their rights and resources. Pleas for federal intervention to protect aboriginal communities impacted by energy projects have fallen on deaf ears for decades. First nations impacted by oil sands developments are tired of waiting for promised regulation, monitoring and health studies.

Instead of pushing the speed dial on these megaprojects, why will the government not take action to defend aboriginal rights and title?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, under the federal framework for aboriginal economic development, our government is working in partnership with first nations, provincial and municipal governments and industrial developers to help first nations and Métis communities secure social and economic developments from the oil sands development.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan Edmonton—Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the minister would like to come up to Fort Chipewyan with me and have that discussion.

Following last week's crown-first nations gathering, the government promised to expedite resolution of land claims and to deliver multi-year financing for first nation governance. Expedited action is required to address long-standing inequities in education, housing, infrastructure. First nations are tired of spending their money, suing the government for failed delivery of commitments on treaty and law.

Will the government deliver on these promises in this year's budget and in this year's legislative agenda?

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Vancouver Island North
B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we made great strides at the crown-first nations gathering. Our government is committed to moving beyond the constraints of the Indian Act. For example, I was proud to announce last week the addition of 18 first nations to the first nations land management regime and to sign the framework agreement for self-government negotiations with the Whitecap Dakota First Nation in Saskatchewan. There is more to follow, real results.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, that allows me to ask the Prime Minister a question with respect to the Enbridge project and the position of the first nations communities that are affected by that project. The National Energy Board review does not actually have complete jurisdiction with respect to first nations issues.

I would like to ask the Prime Minister in particular if he contemplates some additional process that will involve a direct crown-first nations discussion with respect to the impact of this project on first nations.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the hon. leader of the Liberal Party should understand that consulting with aboriginal groups is a constitutional requirement. Of course, that is part of any process. At the same time, I have to reiterate what I have said to Canadians before. It is vitally important to the national interests of this country that we are able to export our energy products to Asia and, obviously, that is something the government hopes will happen in the future.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

If the federal government's position is that it is required to consult aboriginal groups, I would like the Prime Minister to tell us how it is fulfilling this requirement when witnesses are attacked in court by both the Minister of Natural Resources and the Prime Minister. I see two different approaches by the government.

Aboriginal Affairs
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the Constitution requires us to consult aboriginal groups and the government will respect this requirement. At the same time, I have said several times that it is vital for Canada to sell its energy products to Asia. That part of the world has the greatest economic growth. It is important. The government's position on environmental and other processes is that it is up to Canadians to decide their own future.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Raymond Côté Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, the situation at the White Birch Paper plant is a flagrant example of the Conservatives' inaction when it comes to employment. The need to strengthen the Investment Canada Act is pressing because Canadian workers can no longer afford to pay for this government's ineffectiveness. Thousands of jobs have disappeared in the manufacturing and forestry sectors and this government is doing nothing about it.

Are the Conservatives going to keep claiming that everything is just fine? What are they waiting for to take action and finally protect high-quality jobs in Canada?