House of Commons Hansard #69 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was plan.

Topics

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition on behalf of people who want to see the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which is being overfunded at $1.1 billion per annum, sold.

Health Care
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, welcome back to the House. I am very happy to rise on the first day back to present two petitions.

The first petition is signed by concerned residents in Surrey. They are very concerned about federal pharmaceutical policies that they believe have been a total failure, with many Canadians not having equitable access to medicines. They note that Canada is the third most expensive country for brand-name drugs. The petitioners call on Parliament to follow the recommendations of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives' case for universal medicare, developing and implementing legislation for universal public pharmacare.

Canada Consumer Product Safety Act
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the second petition has many pages and is signed by people who are very concerned right across the country. I want to congratulate people for the work they have done in going out and collecting signatures and signing this petition.

The petitioners point out that every year hundreds of thousands of dogs and cats are brutally slaughtered for their fur in a number of Asian regions.

The petitioners call on Canada to join the U.S., Australia and the European Union in banning the import and sale of dog and cat fur. They point out that Canada is the only developed country without such a ban. They further call on us to introduce and support legislation to amend the Canada Consumer Product Safety Act and the Textile Labelling Act based on Bill C-296 from the 41st Parliament, a bill that we currently have in this Parliament.

The Environment
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions. The first petition is on climate change, our most pressing environmental issue, which requires moral and intergenerational responsibility. Climate change may cost Canadians $21 billion to $43 billion by 2050.

The petitioners are asking that Canada sign and implement a binding international agreement to ensure global average temperatures stay below 2ºC, for the government to demonstrate national responsibility and to implement climate justice.

Multiple Sclerosis
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, the other petition is regarding multiple sclerosis, which affects 55,000 to 75,000 Canadians.

With the new treatment, chronic cerebral spinal venous insufficiency, one-third of patients significantly improve, one-third improve, and one-third show little to no improvement. The petitioners are asking that the Minister of Health actively engage people who are involved in CCSVI testing and treatment to have phase III clinical trials on an urgent basis in multiple centres across Canada and to have follow-up care for all patients who have the CCSVI procedure.

Falun Gong
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Joy Smith Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have hundreds of petitions here from Canadians across the country who condemn the persecution of Falun Gong practitioners in China and request the rescue of family members in China.

Falun Gong is a peaceful and beneficial spiritual practice centred on the principles of truth, compassion and forbearance, as well as a set of five meditation exercises. Since July 19, 1999, when the Chinese Communist Party launched an eradication campaign against Falun Gong, its policy was to destroy the reputation of its practitioners, bankrupt them financially and eliminate them completely. This has led to the arbitrary detention and torture of hundreds of thousands of Falun Gong practitioners for their beliefs. Twelve family members of Canadians are now serving jail terms of up to 12 years simply for their belief in Falun Gong.

The medical community, the UN community against torture and many other organizations have shown great concern that living Falun Gong practitioners have been slaughtered en masse for their vital organs for organ transplant tourism. The petitioners are urgently calling on our government to publicly condemn the Chinese Communist regime's illegal persecution of Falun Gong practitioners and to help rescue the family members of Canadians who are incarcerated in China simply for their belief in Falun Gong.

Public Transit
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Olivia Chow Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition from constituents of mine asking the Canadian government to enact a Canada public transit strategy. They note that Canadians are looking for fast, reliable and affordable public transit. At this point, there is no permanent investment planned to support public transit. They are asking for a federal funding mechanism for public transit. They want the federal government to take a leadership role to work with all levels of government to provide sustainable, predictable, long-term and adequate funding. They also want to make sure that there are accountability measures in place so that the funding that is provided for public transit would be done in a transparent way. They note that Canada is the only OECD country that does not have a national public transit strategy.

It is estimated that over the next five years there will be an $18 billion gap in transit infrastructure needs.

Multiple Sclerosis
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition that is signed by a number of people in Saskatchewan, mostly around the Saskatoon and Wadena areas. These Canadians are concerned about chronic cerebral spinal venous insufficiency. They are worried that patients are sometimes denied proper access to testing and treatment in Canada. They urge the Minister of Health to consult with experts who have actual experience in this particular field and to proceed with phase III clinical trials on an urgent basis with a large patient participation in multiple centres across Canada. They also urge the Minister of Health to require follow-up for the patients with the appropriate kind of examination to track their actual experience.

I am very pleased to present this petition on their behalf.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to table a petition from the residents of Canada who draw the attention of the House to the fact that the Government of Canada funds the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to the sum of $1.1 billion per annum and that the vast amounts of Government of Canada funding gives the CBC an unfair advantage over its private sector competitors.

Therefore, the petitioners call upon Parliament to end public funding for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Brian Jean Fort McMurray—Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, my petition is also about good governance, fairness and accountability.

The petitioners state that the Government of Canada funds the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to the sum of $1.1 billion per annum and that the vast amount of Government of Canada funding gives the CBC an unfair advantage over its private sector competitor.

Therefore, the petitioners call upon Parliament to end public funding of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The Environment
Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, for my first petition tabled in the year 2012, I think this is an issue that will dominate 2012.

The petitioners want to note that the proposed Enbridge northern gateway pipeline would require overturning a 40-year moratorium respected by federal and provincial governments in this country since 1972; that a serious oil tanker ban to protect the coastline of British Columbia would require setting aside first nations' rights over much of the territory or, at the very minimum, ensuring consultation and support from first nations; and that the Environmental Assessment Act must be impartial and fair and the government should not suggest that it has already come to a conclusion before the evidence has been heard.

Therefore, the petitioners call upon the Government of Canada to cease support for a specific project, to obtain a neutral stance toward the hearing process and to allow a full, fair and impartial process under the National Energy Board, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and to fully respect first nations' rights.

Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre
Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 198, 203, 205, 208-210, 212, 215, 219, 221, 232, 233, 236, 240, 245-249, 251, 253-255, 258, 259, 265, 273-275, 282, 284, 285, 288, 291, 292, 297, 299, 303, 307, 308, 310, 315, 316, 318, 321-326, 330, 341, 343, 344, 350, 363, 364, 378-380, 382, 386, 401 and 406.

Question No. 198
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, ON

With regard to the National Arts Centre (NAC): (a) for each of the fiscal years from 2001-2002 to 2010-2011, how many complimentary tickets to NAC performances, including, but not limited to, NAC Orchestra, English theatre, French theatre, and dance performances have been given free of charge by the government to Members of Parliament, Senators, Ontario Members of Provincial Parliament, Quebec Members of the National Assembly, elected municipal officials, unelected officials, diplomats and public servants, broken down by category of recipient; and (b) what was the total value of these tickets in each of these fiscal years?

Question No. 198
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam
B.C.

Conservative

James Moore Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, for each of the more than 1,200 performances presented annually on its stages, the National Arts Centre, NAC, sets aside a small number of tickets for marketing, promotions and charitable giveaways. These tickets, which are called excess inventory, are often reserved for invited guests of the performing artists and guests of the show’s promoter, and for other marketing purpose, for example, radio contest giveaways, and for not-for-profit organizations to help them fundraise, as well as, on some occasions, to elected and unelected officials so they may attend NAC performances that showcase their regions or constituents.

In response to (a), the NAC does not have a system that tracks the number of, or who receives, excess inventory tickets, including giveaways, charitable fundraising, and guests of the artist, the promoter or the NAC.

In response to (b), as per standard industry practice, set by industry leaders such as Ticketmaster, excess inventory tickets provide no revenue, because they would not have been sold, and therefore have no monetary value.

Question No. 203
Questions on the Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

With respect to the veterans health care services review undertaken by the government in 2005: (a) was the review cancelled and, if yes, why; (b) what were the total costs of the veterans health care services review; (c) was the health care services review completed; (d) if not, how close was the review to being completed; (e) what are the third party contractors who may have been contracted or sub-contracted to complete the veterans health care services review; (f) what are the draft recommendations from the health care services review; and (g) did Veterans Affairs Canada adopt any of these recommendations from the health care services review?