House of Commons Hansard #164 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was food.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

York—Simcoe
Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, as you know, this report of the commissioner deals with the conduct of a former ambassador after he left the employ of the government. We have put in place very strong rules to deal with exactly these kinds of situations. We expect that all former officials will respect the cooling-off rules that are in place and we will be reviewing the report.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week the Prime Minister's spokesperson said the government will invoke a national security exemption for Shared Services Canada. Yesterday, when the Minister of Public Safety was asked about this exemption he said that he did not know where they got that information. They should talk to each other.

If the Minister of Public Safety does not know about this national security exemption, how can we trust that Huawei will not be getting contracts to control our critical national security infrastructure?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government has put in place a cyber security strategy designed to defend against electronic threats, hacking and cyber espionage. In fact just the other day, I announced an additional $155 million over five years to strengthen Canada's cyber security network, working together with not only our domestic private partners but also our international partners.

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, obviously the Conservatives are having some internal communication problems. They are contradicting each other left and right. Many foreign countries have been very clear. Huawei and certain other state-owned Chinese businesses constitute a threat to national cybersecurity. Yet the minister continues to be evasive and refuses to specify the nature of the threats.

Why not be more transparent? What threats have been identified by the Prime Minister's spokesperson?

Public Safety
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, perhaps the member could speak to her colleague who said the last time a country was named by this government or an official of this government that it was a piece of novel fiction. That member over there said exactly that. I do not think it helps naming a particular country or a particular company unless we are prepared to take specific action.

Our government continuously reviews security matters to ensure that Canadian interests are protected and we will do that even without the opposition's help.

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène LeBlanc LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, this government is steadfastly refusing to do a detailed study of all aspects of the takeover of Nexen by CNOOC. There are serious questions that deserve answers, but the minister is hiding behind an incomplete process and refusing to answer.

Will jobs be preserved? Will environmental standards be respected? There are national security concerns. Taking all this into consideration, do the Conservatives think a foreign government should be controlling Canadian natural resources?

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, one thing is certain: every foreign investment made in Canada has to create a net benefit for Canada and every decision has to be made in the best interests of Canada.

There are factors clearly set out in section 20 of the Investment Canada Act. Again, I repeat: there are guidelines relating to foreign state-owned corporations. In addition, new provisions regarding national security have been put in place.

That said, the transaction is being carefully studied as we speak.

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians across the country are concerned about the idea that an important player in the Canadian natural resources industry like Nexen may end up in the hands of the Chinese state-owned corporation CNOOC.

Does the Minister share Canadians’ concern about foreign governments getting control of our natural resources? Is he going to listen to concerned Canadians in his decision-making process, so that they can have their say?

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, first, resources are the property of the provinces, and under section 20 of the Act, all Canadians are welcome to submit their opinions for consideration, as are the provinces and the individuals concerned. There is a process and we are following it.

Again, I repeat: this transaction is being and will be carefully studied. We know that generally speaking, the NDP is anti-investment and anti-trade. That is not what we believe in. We believe in a prosperous Canada, and the way that happens is by being open to foreign investment.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, unlike the NDP and its job-killing carbon tax, our government's top priority is keeping taxes low and growing the economy with economic action plan 2012. Our plan is working with over 820,000 net new jobs created since July 2009, the best record in the G7. However, the global economy remains fragile, especially in Europe and the United States who are our largest trading partners. That is why we are taking the next step in our plan with the Jobs and Economic Growth Act 2012.

Can the Minister of Finance please inform Canadians on how this legislation will support the Canadian economy?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa
Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for the very informed question. Our government is supporting the economy with jobs, growth and prosperity. The New Democrats need to explain why they are against that. Why is the NDP against extending the hiring credit for small businesses to create jobs, against promoting interprovincial trade, against improving the registered disability savings plan, against new tax relief for clean energy generation equipment and against closing tax loopholes?

Why is the NDP against all of this and against growing the Canadian economy?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, it took 18 years to negotiate a trade investment deal with China but Conservatives want it approved in 21 days. They refuse to bring it before the House for debate, a vote or input from Canadians.

Trade with China is important for our economy if it is done right. However, Conservatives are proving to be incompetent negotiators. They agreed to a 31-year deal that lacks reciprocity, fails to open doors for our companies in China and abandons Canada's commitment to an open and transparent arbitration process.

Why will Conservatives not allow debate and input for this important deal?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Abbotsford
B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, the member is quite wrong. This treaty has been very well received by the business community in Canada. It is very similar to treaties we have signed with other countries. It is designed to protect and promote Canadian investors in China through stable, predictable rules and protection against discriminatory and arbitrary practices. Our government is committed to creating the right conditions for Canadian businesses to compete internationally.

In the meantime, of course, the NDP's investment strategy is to suck $21 billion out of taxpayers' pockets. We will not do that.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is unacceptable to shove this down Canadians’ throats without discussing it with anyone. Think about it. We are talking about less than a month to approve an agreement that we will be bound by for the next three decades. That is ridiculous, but we know that when it comes to ridiculous, the people across the way have no equals. They are again proving that they are amateur negotiators and unable to achieve a mutual benefit. This agreement is going to wreak havoc on the Canadian economy.

Why refuse to hold consultations with Canadian workers, the people who are going to suffer the consequences of this agreement?

International Trade
Oral Questions

October 18th, 2012 / 2:50 p.m.

Abbotsford
B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast Minister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, our government has introduced an unprecedented process for putting Canadian international treaties through the scrutiny of the House. That is why the Canada-China investment treaty was tabled in the House and if opposition members wish to debate it, they have an opportunity to do so. However, surprisingly the NDP has already missed three opportunities to debate it in the House with opposition days.

Canadians know that New Democrats are anti-trade. Today they know that they are also anti-investment. Shame on them.