House of Commons Hansard #183 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was first.

Topics

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, that was not a congratulations letter from Elections Canada; it was a please pay back the money letter they got from Elections Canada. He is confusing it with the congratulations letter he got from the separatist Québec solidaire for being the most generous donor in his constituency.

He asks who is the famous Pierre Poutine. I understand from media reports he lives on Separatist Street. Perhaps the member could visit him when he drops off his next donation.

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about fiction. Let us talk about how the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance tried to divert attention from Elections Canada investigations into what was happening in her campaign by pretending to be a victim, but that tactic was a flop.

Here is what we do know. When Elections Canada called her campaign, her team said the fraudulent calls were coming from Conservative Party headquarters. Here is a chance to be clean and ethical. Do not be part of the cover-up but tell us: Who was it that was coordinating the calls into her riding?

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the only betrayal that occurred here is that the member told his constituents again and again that he would stand behind rural people, honest, law-abiding duck hunters and farmers, and vote to eliminate the wasteful billion dollar long gun registry. But when he had the chance, he decided to betray his word and vote to keep the Liberal long gun registry in place.

While I am at it, I am curious about what he said to his constituents about his leader's comments, calling big mining industries that create jobs in his communities “a disease”.

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, I actually feel for the member for Saint Boniface who is leaving her political reputation in the hands of a spinmeister. Who else is hiding over there? Oh yes, there is the member for Ajax—Pickering, another red-flag campaign constituency. Now, on the day before the election, Elections Canada wrote to the Conservatives, “the frequency of calls seem to be increasing”. So rather than hide behind the duck hunter in the weeds, will the hon. member do the honourable thing and tell us who at Conservative Party headquarters coordinated the dirty tricks in his riding so that he could get here?

41st General Election
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the reason that member raises in the House things that have nothing to do with government business is that he wants to use the umbrella, the comfortable blanket of parliamentary immunity to protect himself against making those false allegations outside of the House of Commons, where, like every other Canadian, he would be accountable to defend them.

One day, he will have to be accountable for the false words he used with his own constituents when he promised that he would eliminate the long gun registry and went back on his word.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Cardigan, PE

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Revenue and acting fisheries minister is fully aware that there are 1,400 former fishers from the Atlantic groundfish licence retirement program who deserve to be treated fairly by the government and paid the millions of dollars they are owed.

After fighting with the fishermen in court for over six years and losing, will the minister finally commit to doing the right thing and ensure that every single former fisher in this program is treated equally and fairly and paid the millions of dollars owed to them?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I can assure the hon. member and the House that these fishers will be treated fairly and that we will clean up the mess created by the Liberal Party.

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Clearly, Mr. Speaker, cutting services to Canadians is becoming the operating policy of the government. However, the consequences for Canadians do not end with service cuts and job losses. In Borden-Carleton, P.E.I. and across Canada, the minister is moving rapidly to privatize the records management division of the CRA, risking the protection and security of documents.

Why is the minister putting at risk sensitive financial and medical records and turning record storage over to minimum-wage employees?

Canada Revenue Agency
Oral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Egmont
P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, we do not keep medical records. We are the department of national revenue. I want to make sure that is clear.

Our top priority, of course, is the economy, which includes making sure that Canadian tax dollars are spent wisely. This change will ensure the privacy and security of taxpayers' records and will do so at a lower cost. We must ensure that taxpayers' money is spent where it will do the most good. In any event, more and more Canadians are moving to electronic services.

Taxation
Oral Questions

November 22nd, 2012 / 2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner Cape Breton—Canso, NS

Mr. Speaker, Conservative import tariffs are forcing Canadian hockey families to pay $200 more to suit up their kids in hockey gear than American families pay. Tomorrow, on Black Friday, thousands of Canadian families will head south of the border to buy hockey gear to avoid this Conservative hockey tax. That creates American jobs in American cities.

Why will the finance minister not give Canadian families a break this Christmas, help Canadian retailers and get rid of this job-killing hockey tax?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. friend for his insightful question. I thought we were in football season, but I guess we are moving toward hockey.

Our government has reduced tariffs and taxes on Canadians. That brings the cost of everything down. We also put in place a fitness tax credit for parents who want to enrol their children in sports. However, if I recall, I think everyone on that side of the House voted against that as well.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, government ministers are in Brussels for closed door trade talks with the EU, where Conservatives are actually pushing for provisions that would allow foreign corporations to sue Canadian governments. Today, Mobil Oil won a challenge that strikes down Newfoundland and Labrador's efforts to encourage investments in R and D. We have just seen lawsuits filed against Quebec's fracking laws and Ontario's wind energy legislation, and the Conservative FIPA with China allows foreign investors to sue Canadian taxpayers as well.

Will the Conservatives put a stop to these undemocratic measures and protect Canadian taxpayers?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I would like to welcome the NDP back to the trade file. The NDP members have been ignoring this file for a long period of time.

To follow up on the member's comments, the minister is indeed in Brussels, doing the job that he is supposed to be doing, putting the finishing touches on a comprehensive economic and trade agreement with the European Union. That is important work.

As far as the FIPA with China goes, that is important because it will allow us to have rules-based trading with them, something that even the NDP should support.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' double-talk on supply management is rather worrisome.

On one hand, the minister tells poultry and egg producers and dairy and cheese producers that they have nothing to worry about. On the other hand, as soon as the minister is behind closed doors, he trades away the supply management system. The government must not change the rules on access and the tariffs that protect our supply management system, period.

Will the minister defend this principle in Europe today?

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

I am waiting for the light to go on. Okay, we have the light.

Mr. Speaker, the opposition—