House of Commons Hansard #78 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was balance.

Topics

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister seems to be manipulating the facts to make us believe that it has no choice but to cut old age security. However, it could choose to change old age security; it could choose not to cut old age security. It is unacceptable. The government is mortgaging our young people's future even though it says that it is trying to secure their future. The youth unemployment rate is double the nation's average.

I will repeat my question. I am sure the minister heard me, but for some odd reason, she never answered. Will the government raise retirement age from 65 to 67, yes or no?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we will protect the system for both today's seniors and tomorrow's. I can assure you that people receiving old age security benefits today will not lose a penny. We will protect them. We have to ensure the viability of the old age security program, and that is what we will do.

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

Guy Caron Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives immediately reject any statistical data that do not correspond to their ideology: the science of climate change, statistics on lower crime rates and on the use of the long gun registry. On top of that, the Conservatives have done away with about 40 Statistics Canada publications regarding important, reputable analyses in area like health care, culture, the economy and food distribution. All social indicators will be flushed down the drain.

Will they ever stop seeing the world based on their ideology instead of on science? Will this wilful blindness never end?

Science and Technology
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I think the word “efficiency” is lost on the NDP. There are ways to be more efficient. I understand that Statistics Canada put an end to those surveys because they were redundant and in order to get the best value for taxpayers' dollars. That is a foreign concept on the other side of the House.

We will not take any lessons from the opposition parties. No other government in Canadian history has invested as much as we have since 2007 in science and technology. And the members opposite were always happy to vote against those investments. It is completely ridiculous and unbelievable.

Pensions
Oral Questions

February 10th, 2012 / 11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are standing up against the Prime Minister's attack on pensions. Yesterday, Conservative MPs' offices were occupied by their constituents concerned about how they had been conned. Yet, like trained seals, no one on the Conservative bench is willing to stand up for constituents against the wrong priorities of the government.

The Prime Minister, in 2005, stated, “We will protect public pensions”. He is now breaking his word.

Will the government stop its betrayal of seniors and rethink its budget priorities?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is committed to protecting seniors' pensions and that is exactly what he is doing.

However, we are not so short-sighted as the Liberals. We are not saying that if one has an old age security cheque today that is fine and one can forget about the future. No. We need to take care of all Canadians.

We need to take care of Canadians who are retired today and collecting OAS. We are going to do that. We are going to make sure that they do not lose a penny because of any changes. The same goes for those who are nearing retirement. However, we have a responsibility to Canadians to ensure the viability of the system for the future.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, the minister does have a responsibility to Canadians.

Before the Prime Minister was the Prime Minister he was out campaigning. He told Canadians something very concise in regard to the old age supplement and that was, “Today we must fight to preserve seniors' hard won gains”. How does increasing the age from 65 to 67 mean that he is fighting for seniors?

Like the ad says, even kids know that it is wrong to hold out on people when they are counting on you--

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. Minister of Human Resources.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, that is exactly why we are doing what we are doing.

Canadians can count on us. They want to count on us. They will be able to because we are going to make sure that there is an old age security system there for them today and for generations to come.

The math is quite simple. Proportionately speaking, there will be half as many people in the workforce paying taxes into the general revenue fund, that pays for OAS. Half as many people will bear three times the cost. That is not sustainable. We are going to make it sustainable so that future generations can access OAS.

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's style of dictatorial federalism is to shut down discussion and try and intimidate anyone who disagrees with him.

He has the member for Fort McMurray—Athabasca insinuating that first nations are accepting bribes from environmentalists. While in China, he is undermining our environmental processes and our regulatory review, boasting that he will make sure the northern gateway pipeline goes through no matter what.

The citizens of British Columbia will not be intimidated and we will not be dictated to.

Will the Prime Minister stop his assault on British Columbians and stop his assault on our regulatory processes?

Natural Resources
Oral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands
Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, one of the great strengths of the Prime Minister is that he is able to work with other groups and the provinces. He has been doing that since we were elected as government.

The Minister of the Environment has referred the northern gateway pipeline to the joint review. The panel is holding hearings. We look forward to it conducting those sessions.

We will continue to work with the provinces, with industry and with first nations in order to see these projects go ahead in a safe and environmental way.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has received a deluge of letters from Canadians worried about the Canada-Europe trade negotiations opening us up to more privatization of our health care system.

Greater control of these services is a key target for European companies in this deal. Leaked documents now confirm this. It seems that the Conservatives are willing to roll back protections for our public health care system.

Will the government listen to Canadians and take health care off the table in the CETA negotiations?

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I have said several times in this place that the NDP should not put any credibility in leaked documents. Those members should get their facts straight.

Like all of Canada's trade agreements, a free trade agreement with the European Union would exclude public services such as public health, public education and social services. Canada's trade obligations do not require us to privatize any part of our health care system. End of story.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, that response clearly demonstrates that the Conservatives are incapable of standing up for Canadians when it comes to signing trade agreements.

Health care experts in Quebec have consulted the annexes only to realize that public services, including health care, are not yet part of the official exemptions. Thus, the Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec is not sufficiently protected in the negotiations.

Why sacrifice public services that are vital to Canadians? Will the government commit to protecting our public health care system by putting it on the list of exclusions? Yes or no? The question is clear.

International Trade
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, we should be perfectly clear. The provinces have been part of these negotiations since the very beginning. They have been apprised of the negotiations. They have been in the room with our negotiators and European Union negotiators.

Any aspersions that somehow this is going to affect health care in Canada are simply false.