House of Commons Hansard #101 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was banks.

Topics

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the medical officers of health of three provinces, British Columbia, Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan, as well as perhaps one of Canada's leading public health experts, Dr. Evan Wood, have just written an article which states categorically that Canadian drug policy is going in absolutely the wrong direction. It is not based on evidence, it is not based on science, it is not based on reducing harm and it is not based on having a good effect.

Why do the Conservatives still not have a good policy on addiction and on mental health? Why do they have a failed policy and why do they only have a jail policy?

Health
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this government has taken substantial efforts to try to curb smoking. One of the things we will not do is try to legalize marijuana. We think that is not in the best interests of middle-class families across the country. We believe we should get tough on drug dealers, people who sell drugs to our children. We believe this is very important.

If the Liberal Party saw this as a huge priority, why did it not campaign on it in the last election campaign?

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, let us have an honest conversation on this issue. The most dangerous drug in the country today, according to those health experts and everyone else who has studied the problem, is alcohol. We tried prohibition on alcohol. It proved to be a disastrous and expensive failure.

The Minister of National Defence just announced yesterday that Canada would now join the war on drugs in Central America and Latin America, just at a time when the leaders of those countries are saying clearly and categorically it is the wrong direction for Canada, it is an expensive direction for Canada and it will not work.

Why does the minister persist in this dangerous—

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Health
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, this government will fight people who want to sell drugs to our children in Canada. We will fight drug violence anywhere in the world to try and support families. If the Liberal Party wants to legalize marijuana, wants to legalize drugs, the leader of the Liberal Party should be honest, stand in this place and tell Canadians this is its big priority.

Our priority is jobs, hope and opportunity, the long-term economic prosperity of our country. That is where this government is focused, that is our mandate, and we are pleased with the 400 new jobs at Toyota that were announced just today.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, since the Prime Minister is not here, I will direct my question to the Minister of Industry.

When the Prime Minister was in opposition, he said on several occasions that it was a clear question of integrity and that it was important to do the right thing. When ministers found themselves in situations of questionable ethics, the leader of the opposition at the time called for their resignation.

So why does the minister not tender his resignation to the Prime Minister of Canada immediately?

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, for the Liberal Party and all members of the House, the Minister of Industry has always represented Canada and Canadians with great integrity. As far as I am aware, the minister was not lobbied by Mr. Aubut on any government business. The minister has pointed out very clearly that he paid for his own trip.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow's budget will be about choices, and the government must choose something other than abandoning Canadian workers.

This government has boasted that it has all the tools needed to protect the 2,600 Aveos workers and to ensure that they do not lose their livelihood.

When does the government plan to use those tools? When will this government take steps to protect Canada's aerospace industry? When will the government do its job, so Aveos workers can keep theirs?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean
Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, of course, we recognize just how much job losses affect workers and their families.

However, I would remind my hon. colleague that, since coming to power, our government has invested more than $600 million in the aerospace industry in the Montreal region alone. More often than not, the NDP voted against those investments.

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, let us look at the facts: 130 jobs lost at AstraZeneca; 500 jobs at EMD; 500 jobs at Transcontinental; 700 jobs at Mabe; and of course, the 2,600 jobs at Aveos. And I could go on.

The youth unemployment rate is 15% and 400,000 jobs have been lost in the manufacturing sector.

What does the minister have to say to the families that are paying the price for this government's bad decisions? Why not put employment and public services first in tomorrow's budget?

Aerospace Industry
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, we put first Canadians who are looking for work, and there are still too many Canadians who are searching for jobs. That is why the budget that will be tabled in this House tomorrow will actually continue on the path we have started, which is promoting jobs, the economy and a strong, prosperous future for Canadians. It is important for Canadians to find work. We would certainly hope the NDP could see its way clear to support a new plan for jobs and growth.

Employment
Oral Questions

March 28th, 2012 / 2:30 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, let us see how the government did on the old plan.

The IMF says that in 2011 Canada finished 130th in economic growth worldwide. In 2012 the figures are even worse. Canada was 152nd according to projections by the IMF.

Almost 700,000 more Canadians are worse off under the government. They are unemployed. They have given up searching for work or they are in part-time jobs and looking for full-time jobs. That is the real Conservative record. There is $10,000 a year less for Canadians who have new jobs. That is the Conservative record.

Why does the government not bring—

Employment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

The hon. Minister of State for Finance.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Macleod
Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies Minister of State (Finance)

Mr. Speaker, I sense the excitement in the his voice. He is looking forward to hearing a budget he can support. I would encourage him to listen very closely, because I think there will be a lot in the budget he can support.

One is financial literacy, and we are moving forward on that. The hon. member obviously could use a few lessons because he is comparing developing countries to those that are developed. I would encourage him to go back to the school books to figure out the massive difference.

We would be looking for support, and so would Canadians, for a jobs, growth and prosperity budget.

Employment
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, what so many Canadian families are looking for from the government is job literacy because its record has been so poor. The latest of those who have been sacrificed are the Aveos workers.

Last year the former minister of transport told the House:

There will not be any job losses. Air Canada has said that it is going to maintain the overhaul centres in Winnipeg, Mississauga and in Montreal. It has to do so by legislation.

Why is the government breaking its promise to 2,600 Canadian families? Why does it not act to save those jobs? Why does it not stand up for Canadian workers and do its job so Aveos workers can go back to doing theirs?