House of Commons Hansard #131 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was changes.

Topics

Mining Industry
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, let me disagree on that.

The fact is that there is a critical need for a reform of corporate social responsibility.

In recent weeks, we have also heard from delegations from Peru, Guatemala, Colombia and Honduras on possible violations of human rights and environmental standards by Canadian mining companies.

When will this government establish a system that truly protects human rights and the reputation of Canadian companies?

Mining Industry
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's
Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, I reject the premise of the member's question.

Our government is helping developing countries better manage their natural resources through the new Canadian International Institute for Extractive Industries and Development. Specific incidents are investigated and prosecuted by local authorities.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

May 31st, 2012 / 2:50 p.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the world has been shocked and horrified by the violence engulfing Syria. In Hula, over 100 civilians were massacred this past weekend, including 49 children.

We must find an end to this conflict, and countries like Russia can play a pivotal role. The British Foreign Secretary visited Moscow this week to urge the Russians to exert their influence to help save lives and end the conflict.

What specific actions will the Minister of Foreign Affairs take to reach out to his Russian colleague?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I wholeheartedly agree with my colleague from Ottawa Centre. Obviously we abhor the violence going on in Syria.

I did spend some time on the phone with British Foreign Secretary William Hague to discuss his recent visit to Russia. Last night I met the Russian ambassador at a social event and indicated that I would be keen to get together with him in short order to discuss the situation in Syria.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Ève Péclet La Pointe-de-l'Île, QC

Mr. Speaker, right now, a tragedy is unfolding, one that has gone on for too long. Thirteen new bodies were found yesterday in eastern Syria. Since the beginning of this conflict, there have been over 10,000 victims and hundreds of thousands of refugees. Because it has no seat on the Security Council and too often shows no international leadership, Canada is on the sidelines watching this disaster.

Can the Minister of Foreign Affairs tell us what diplomatic efforts he has made to urge Russia to support a ceasefire?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean
Ontario

Conservative

John Baird Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it is regrettable that the member opposite is taking a partisan approach to this issue.

Canada has been actively involved with the broader Friends of Syria group. The French government invited Canada to participate in the smaller working group of that initiative. We are working closely with our allies to coordinate sanctions and coordinate efforts at the United Nations to try to end the violence. We will continue to do that.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Paul Dewar Ottawa Centre, ON

What about the Security Council?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

John Baird Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Oh, Mr. Speaker, the member for Ottawa Centre is finally speaking in the House. It has only been a year.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, when welders are laid off from a pipeline in northern Alberta because of weather, it is not their fault. When substitute teachers in Toronto have no work between classes, it is not their fault. When hotel and fish plant workers in Cape Breton are laid off at the end of the season, it is not their fault. These employees and their employers have paid into the EI system and contribute greatly to our economy.

Why is the Prime Minister calling them repeat offenders and destroying their livelihoods?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk
Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, EI, as members know, is a federal program that is designed to help provide financial support to people when they look for a job, when it is not their fault, but it is a temporary mechanism to provide them with support while they look for another job.

We are ensuring that people understand those responsibilities better and provide them with help to find those new jobs. We are also making it worthwhile for those people who have difficulty finding a job to work part-time. We are going to let them keep some of that money for the first time.

We are there for Canadians, and when they cannot find a job, EI will be there for them.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Foote Random—Burin—St. George's, NL

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government's assault on all things important continues, but it is the most recent actions by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans that is the most disturbing.

Newfoundlanders and Labradorians were shocked to learn that the minister was looting 20 jobs from the St. John's DFO office and moving them to his own riding where no DFO office presently exists. It is a move that will cost Canadian taxpayers millions of dollars.

Does the minister not understand that the misuse of power is inappropriate and will he commit to keep those jobs in St. John's?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission
B.C.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, this should not come as a surprise to the other side by now, but our government is committed to finding efficiencies that are moderate and balanced. That is what we have done in this case. There are currently six centres that handle administrative matters—

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and for the Asia-Pacific Gateway has the floor.

The hon. parliamentary secretary.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Randy Kamp Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission, BC

Mr. Speaker, I will start again. As I have said, we are about finding efficiencies that are moderate and balanced. I think that is what taxpayers expect of us.

There are currently six centres that do financial matters on behalf of DFO. We are consolidating those into one so that it can all be done in one place. We think that is a more efficient way to do it and I think most Canadians would agree.