House of Commons Hansard #141 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was copyright.

Topics

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, a lot of people watching may not realize that parliamentary privilege protects this member, so he can say anything he wants without ever having to prove it. He can disparage the reputation of anybody and he never has to back up any of his allegations with facts. He has made some very clear ones. He has no evidence to back them up.

I would encourage him, if he has the integrity, if he has the courage, to take the exact statement that he just made, walk outside in front of the media and repeat those allegations. It is my bet that he will not do it.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, the official security unit in the Privy Council Office is very good at what they do. If someone close to the Prime Minister, like his parliamentary secretary, is in trouble, the office knows it. They investigate it and they tell the Prime Minister.

If there were a risk of election fraud, the Prime Minister would know, or if there were evidence of forged documents, the Prime Minister would know, yet, as he did with his friend Bruce Carson, he is wilfully blind, putting the integrity of his government in jeopardy.

When will the Prime Minister tell his parliamentary secretary to stand aside, and has he yet notified the RCMP?

Ethics
Oral Questions

June 15th, 2012 / 11:40 a.m.

Nepean—Carleton
Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, these are the same kinds of false allegations that the Liberal Party threw around for an entire election campaign. The reason the allegations never went anywhere is that the party never had any evidence for the things they were saying. The Liberals spend all their time talking about things for which they have no evidence because they have no agenda for this country, no plan for this economy. They have nothing to offer the Canadian electorate and the Canadian public.

We on this side of the House of Commons are getting things done. That is why the Liberals are over there in the corner.

Ethics
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives cheered yesterday as they raised the age for OAS from 65 to 67. However, Canadians are not cheering. They are concerned about this major cutback to their retirement security. They are furious that the Prime Minister broke his promise on pensions.

Why did the Conservatives cheer for a move that will unnecessarily hurt generations of Canadian seniors? Why were they not honest with Canadians in the last election?

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Simcoe—Grey
Ontario

Conservative

Kellie Leitch Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I have to say that we were very pleased yesterday to see the passage of Bill C-38 so that we can move forward with our job creation and economic growth agenda.

With respect to OAS, I will repeat what I said earlier this week in the House. First, there will be no reductions in seniors' pensions.

I will also quote the OECD Secretary-General, who stated:

Bold action is required. Breaking down the barriers that stop older people from working beyond traditional retirement ages will be a necessity to ensure that our children and grand-children can enjoy an adequate pension at the end of their working life.

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Some hon. members

Hear! Hear!

Pensions
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Parkdale—High Park.

Employment
Oral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, there the Conservatives go again, cheering while Canadians are worrying about their retirement security.

Also buried in this Trojan Horse bill is the repeal of the Fair Wages and Hours of Labour Act. For nearly a century it has ensured that construction workers could make a decent day's pay for an honest day's work. However, the Conservatives are happy to scrap it.

Why were the Conservatives not honest with Canadians about their plans, and what do they have against hard-working Canadians?

Employment
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Simcoe—Grey
Ontario

Conservative

Kellie Leitch Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I am mildly entertained by the question because it is the NDP who are against those hard-working Canadians, particularly in western Canada.

We are working and moving forward to make sure there are jobs created in this country so that Canadians have an opportunity to work, and that is what we want them to do.

With regard to fair wages, this change will eliminate red tape for small businesses. Apparently all construction workers in Canada, including workers with federal contracts, are protected by provincial and territorial employment standards.

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Mylène Freeman Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government will further restrict access to employment insurance.

Thirty-four per cent of Canadians have jobs that do not fit into a little box—part-time, temporary or multiple jobs. These workers typically do not have access to employment insurances. Many of them belong to marginalized groups, and this bill will put them at an even greater disadvantage.

Why are the Conservatives attacking our most vulnerable workers?

Employment Insurance
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Simcoe—Grey
Ontario

Conservative

Kellie Leitch Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, as I have said several times before, the top priority of the government is job creation and economic growth. That is exactly why we passed Bill C-38 yesterday evening in this House. Although the opposition were completely against all those job creation programs, we are moving forward.

The government is making improvements to employment insurance. The reason for this is to make sure we can meet the needs of Canadians. We are being responsive, to better connect Canadians with local jobs with their local qualifications.

Employment Equity
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Sana Hassainia Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Trojan Horse budget is an attack on our most vulnerable workers.

The federal contractors program for employment equity affects over a million workers. The program goals have not yet been achieved. A legitimate economic action plan would include women, cultural communities and first nations.

Why are the Conservatives dismantling a program that fights discrimination?

Employment Equity
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Simcoe—Grey
Ontario

Conservative

Kellie Leitch Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, as I have already mentioned in this House today, Bill C-38 is a job creation bill. We are moving forward to make sure that Canadians have the opportunity to have a job. In fact, we have created 760,000 net new jobs since the recession.

With respect to the Employment Equity Act, it has been amended to allow greater flexibility in programming to provide an opportunity for more Canadians to have a role, a job and something to improve the quality of life for their families.

The Budget
Oral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Kyle Seeback Brampton West, ON

Mr. Speaker, over the past few days we have spent an incredible amount of time on economic action plan 2012. We remain focused on this legislation, as it is the top priority for Canadians: jobs, growth and long-term prosperity. We remain committed to economic action plan 2012's positive long-term plan for the economy, while the opposition continues to advocate for big government and high taxes.

We look forward to this legislation being passed so we can put these positive measures to work for Canadian families.

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance please speak to the benefits of economic action plan 2012?