House of Commons Hansard #153 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was support.

Topics

The Environment
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Bryan Hayes Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, I want to share with all members of the House comments made recently by the NDP member for Burnaby—New Westminster. Just weeks ago the NDP member said, “the federal government seems to completely reject the policy of cap-and-trade, which allows us to put a price on carbon”.

Our Conservative government completely rejects the NDP policy of putting a price on carbon. The NDP policy is a job-killing carbon tax that would increase the price of everything, including gas, groceries and electricity.

What is really dangerous about the comments from the NDP member is, despite the fact that our natural resource sector would suffer catastrophic job losses with an NDP carbon tax, the NDP member advancing a carbon tax is the NDP's natural resource critic.

The NDP might not care about the 1.6 million Canadian jobs dependent on the resource sector, but we do. That is why we will continue to fight the NDP's job-killing carbon tax.

Pork Industry
Statements by Members

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Malcolm Allen Welland, ON

Mr. Speaker, there is a looming crisis in Canada's pork industry. Drought conditions across North America have increased the price of feed. Some of Canada's largest pork producers have filed for creditor protection.

It is estimated that pork prices in the summer of 2013 will be the highest in Canadian history. However, all the government can do is hem and haw about plans it may or may not have to deal with this crisis.

When the NDP raised the issue of drought conditions last week, the government was entirely dismissive. It did not see a crisis. It did not see a need for action.

However, in a letter to the NDP leader from the Alberta Pork board of directors it says, “Without significant support...the pig industry in Canada will most definitely begin to collapse within the next few months”.

We, in the NDP, stand with producers and, like them, demand action from the government, not just words, to address this devastating crisis. When will it act?

The Environment
Statements by Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Ryan Leef Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, as winter approaches and temperatures begin to drop, Canadians in my riding up north and across the country are thankful that they are not subject to the NDP's massive carbon tax.

The NDP's carbon tax scheme would drastically raise the price of electricity, causing families to use more of their hard-earned money to heat their homes. The NDP's regressive $21 billion carbon tax is reckless and unfair to hard-working families that simply want to keep their homes warm and comfortable during the fall and winter months.

I am proud that our government has continually lowered taxes for Canadian families and has created important initiatives that help Canadians save money, like the home renovation tax credit, which saves Canadians tax dollars and decreases their home heating costs.

The NDP should be ashamed of its sneaky carbon tax, call it a carbon budget, that would take money directly from the pockets of hard-working Canadians.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, with 300,000 more Canadians unemployed today than before the crash of 2008, a record $50 billion trade deficit and the highest household debt in Canadian history, the Conservatives' solution is to send the Minister of Finance to lecture business leaders, but Canadian business leaders are voting with their wallets and holding off on new investment. They are sitting on over half a trillion dollars in dead money.

When will the Conservatives stop lecturing Canadians on the economy and start listening?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as I have said repeatedly, we all know there are great challenges in the world economy that affect our country.

With that said, Canada's economic performance continues to be far superior to that of most other developed countries. The number of jobs is up by more than three-quarters of a million, investment is up, exports are up and growth is up.

We will ensure that we resist any ideas for carbon taxes, for tax increases, for shutting down industries and for blocking trade. This government is committed to the growth and prosperity of our country.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, our priority is jobs. The Conservatives' priority is making up stuff about the NDP.

Since 2006, the Conservatives have wasted $55 billion in gifts to big corporations through tax cuts. The Prime Minister swore that this would create jobs, but what is really happening is that Canadian businesses are letting half a billion dollars sit in their coffers.

Since even his Minister of Finance has admitted that these corporate tax cuts have not had the expected results in terms of investments in job creation, what will the Prime Minister do to get all of this money circulating?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, again today, an international organization said that Canada was one of the best places in the world to invest in. That is why investments are going up, job creation is going up and economic growth is going up.

Obviously, there is more to do, but we are moving in the right direction.

I do not have to make up anything about the NDP. I have here, in black and white, its platform from the last election. There is a little table at the end, which says, “Cap and Trade Revenues By Year”, $21 billion, “Be a part of it”.

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Outremont
Québec

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Leader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, after seven years of Conservative corporate tax cuts, the Conservatives have nothing better to offer than more lectures to Canadian businesses. However, despite their finger wagging, Canadian businesses are sitting on over half a trillion dollars in dead money. Even the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters has said that Conservative corporate tax cuts have had “little observable impact on new investment in Canada”.

What will it take for the Conservative government to finally change course?

The Economy
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Calgary Southwest
Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper Prime Minister

Mr. Speaker, under our government, our record of growth continues to be superior. Taxes are down not just for business, they are down for individuals, they are down for families. In every case, the NDP voted against those tax cuts. We have voted for them.

The manufacturing sector can speak for itself. Let me read what the president of Patriot Forge, a manufacturing company in southwestern Ontario, just said, “The higher taxes proposed by the NDP will make it much more difficult for our Canadian plants to compete”.

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, because of the Conservatives' improvised and uncertain economic framework, oil company executives are asking the government to put in place clear rules regarding ownership of the oil sands, which the Conservatives are not doing. Instead, they are holding discussions behind closed doors about Nexen.

Will the Conservatives listen to the concerns of Canadians and business owners instead of ignoring them?

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, our government will always act in the best interests of the country. As we have said, this transaction will be examined very carefully. I must also remind my colleague that the Investment Canada Act contains provisions to protect national interests. These are provisions the NDP voted against.

She spoke about company executives. I can say one thing: company executives can rest assured that we will not leave them out in the cold by bringing in taxes that are too high and by opposing any form of trade and investment in the country.

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, when oil industry executives have more concern about Canadian sovereignty than the government, we know there is a problem.

People are concerned about opening the floodgates to other foreign governments buying up our natural resources. No matter how much the Conservatives furrow their brows and point to their shoelaces, if they refuse to act we will have the slow hollowing out and the nationalization of our resource sector by other governments.

What is it going to take to get one of those ministers up on their feet, listening to the real concerns of Canadians?

Foreign Investment
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable
Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis Minister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, when we speak with the business community and entrepreneurs, the ones who created the wealth in this country, they tell us that they are very afraid of the proposed NDP carbon tax, $21 billion of revenue. They are afraid of the NDP's approach of anti-trade, anti-business, and anti-investment.

I am speaking about Canada. I am proud to be Canadian. Everything we have done on this side of the House is in the best interests of Canada.

Government Accountability
Oral Questions

September 26th, 2012 / 2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, this is Right to Know Week and we are supposed to be focusing on the benefits of transparency and accountability. Do members remember those words?

However, the Conservative government is marking it by hiding cuts from the Parliamentary Budget Officer and by hiding the true cost of the F-35. Now the Prime Minister has a secret cabinet committee on cuts that is chaired by the minister of gazebos himself.

When will Canadians get access to the information that they have paid for with their tax dollars?

Government Accountability
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka
Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement President of the Treasury Board and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario

Mr. Speaker, I am not quite sure what the hon. member is referring to. I am chairing a new cabinet committee which was announced in a news release by the Prime Minister's Office. That is not exactly the way to be secretive, I would assure the hon. member.

We believe that the budget officer should concentrate his time and his energy examining how Parliament and the Government of Canada spends its money, not fretting about money we have not spent. That is the fundamental difference.

We will be accountable to Parliament on all of those expenditures.