Evidence of meeting #21 for COVID-19 Pandemic in the 43rd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament’s site, as are the minutes.) The winning word was chair.

A video is available from Parliament.

On the agenda

MPs speaking

Also speaking

1:50 p.m.

Independent

Jody Wilson-Raybould Independent Vancouver Granville, BC

Thank you.

Just to clarify and be certain, does the minister agree that these powers of governance should be the exclusive powers to recognize indigenous peoples?

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett Liberal Toronto—St. Paul's, ON

That is everything we're working toward, the nation building and rebuilding and the rights recognition as nations come together to determine who is a nation and who are their members. That is the work we're supporting coast to coast to coast, and my job is to accelerate that progress.

1:50 p.m.

Independent

Jody Wilson-Raybould Independent Vancouver Granville, BC

This government has stated numerous times that it is committed to advancing sentencing reform that will “stand the test of time”. It also states it is “committed to...[addressing] the tragic problem of overrepresentation of indigenous peoples and marginalized Canadians while holding offenders to account and protecting victims.”

I think most members in this House would agree that the time for empty promises is over and that action is required. Evidence clearly shows that mandatory minimum penalties are a big part of the problem and not smart justice policy. There has been enough study and too much delay due to political expediency.

When will the government confirm that it will repeal mandatory minimum penalties for all but the most serious offences?

1:50 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard—Verdun Québec

Liberal

David Lametti LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

We, as always, are very concerned with the tragedy, if you will, Madam Chair, of overrepresentation of indigenous peoples in our criminal justice system and in incarceration. We have described it as a “national shame”, so we understand that. We are working on a number of different fronts in order to reduce that. Those include continually looking at the Criminal Code and seeing where reform is possible, and that includes sentencing reform.

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

The Acting Chair (Mrs. Alexandra Mendès) Liberal Alexandra Mendes

The floor now goes to Mr. Boulerice.

1:50 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Thank you, Madam Chair.

In Quebec, 55,000 people are waiting for social housing. Groups are demanding social housing. Montreal wants to provide social housing, like Quebec City and like Ottawa.

Ottawa is asking Quebec City to provide social housing, but Quebec City replies that no one can ask it to do what it already wants to do.

Families are suffering at the moment. Can we get out of this crazy situation and release the money?

1:50 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Families

Madam Chair, we are committed to reaching a bilateral housing agreement with the government of Quebec. Based on the principles of partnership and collaboration, we want to ensure that we reach an agreement that works for Quebec and Quebeckers, and we're committed to reaching that agreement very soon.

1:50 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Well, let's go; “chop, chop”, as they say.

Madam Chair, for the performing arts, for the theatre arts and for dozens of festivals, 2020 is a lost year.

Is the Minister of Canadian Heritage going to come to the aid of this aspect of our culture? When will he do so?

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Steven Guilbeault Liberal Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Madam Chair, my thanks to my colleague for his question and for his interest in arts and culture.

We acted quickly at the very beginning of the pandemic. We put almost $2.5 billion into arts and culture through the Canada emergency response benefit and the emergency wage subsidy. As an emergency measure, we have provided $500 million to arts, culture and sport across Canada.

We have already started to help this sector, and we will continue to help the sector get through this unprecedented crisis.

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

The minister is very good at listing past measures, but much less so in telling us about what he is going to do in the future. For workers in tourism or culture and for the artists and craftspeople, the CERB will end on July 4.

The Union des artistes, ACTRA, and the Fédération nationale des communications et de la culture are worried.

I have one quick question. What are all those people going to do on July 5?

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carla Qualtrough Liberal Delta, BC

Madam Chair, Canadians across the country are wondering what comes next from our government, and I can assure them that although yesterday we had a massive setback when we tried to introduce flexibilities into the wage subsidy and into the CERB that didn't work, we're looking to see how we can continue to support workers, how we can continue to ensure that jobs that are available are filled and how we can make sure that we don't disincentivize work as we move into the next phase.

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Madam Chair, it is a simple question.

For restaurant workers, for bar workers, for workers in tourism and for workers in culture, is the CERB going to be extended, yes or no?

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carla Qualtrough Liberal Delta, BC

I have said a number of times, Madam Chair, that we will continue to be there for workers and their families.

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

The aerospace industry represents more than 70,000 good Jobs in Quebec, in at least 245 companies.

With aircraft stuck on the ground, the future is very uncertain.

Other countries around the world are supporting their aerospace workers. Here, we do not even have a fund specific to the sector.

When will there be a national aerospace strategy that will protect our jobs?

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Mélanie Joly Liberal Ahuntsic-Cartierville, QC

Madam Chair, my colleague's question is appropriate because we know that the aerospace sector is greatly affected. It is also a major sector in Montreal, where his constituency and mine are located.

That is why we are here and why we are also here for SMEs. Through the CED, there is funding for the aerospace sector. We will continue to answer the call.

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Madam Chair, an important vote will take place next week. Canada is in contention for a seat on the United Nations Security Council.

Today, Greta Thunberg and 22 scientists rapped our knuckles because they say that we continue to subsidize the oil and gas sector.

Is it possible that we may not obtain the seat on the Security Council because we are actually at the back of the pack in the fight against the climate emergency?

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Mary Ng Liberal Markham—Thornhill, ON

We know that Canada must show leadership in the face of the major global challenges that we face, and more than ever Canada is playing a positive role by being a champion of diversity and inclusion, addressing climate change, leading peace and security efforts and helping the most vulnerable. A seat on the Security Council will allow Canada to be a strong voice for a fair, more inclusive and more prosperous world. This is the message that Canada wants to bring to the table.

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Acting Chair (Mrs. Alexandra Mendès) Liberal Alexandra Mendes

Mrs. Vignola now has the floor.

June 11th, 2020 / 1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Thank you, Madam Chair.

On Tuesday, we learned that two shipyards were getting together to try once more to squeeze Chantier Davie out of the project to build polar-class icebreakers.

Despite the fact that the submission deadline is long past, Chantier Davie prequalified.

When will it receive the contract to build polar-class icebreakers?

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Anand Liberal Oakville, ON

This issue is still under decision at the current time. Davie has begun the process of qualifying to be the third shipyard, and that process is also occurring at the current time. In due course, a decision will be made about the polar icebreaker, just not at the current time.

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

I understand that discussions are necessary, of course. Nevertheless, Chantier Davie represents 50% of the shipbuilding capacity in Canada. Quebec has provided $22 billion of the $100 billion for the national shipbuilding strategy. However, we have received only 3% of those funds, about $3 billion.

When will Chantier Davie finally have the contract in its hands?

2 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Madam Chair, I must highlight the extraordinary work of all employees at Chantier Davie. For decades, Chantier Davie has been a major supplier to the Government of Canada and an extraordinary partner. We will always work with Chantier Davie. It will always be a pleasure to do so because the company does absolutely exceptional work.

2 p.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Thank you for your words of recognition for the work of Chantier Davie and its employees, who are indeed exceptional. However, the recognition can also translate into actions. One of those actions would be to award them the contract to build the polar-class icebreakers.

2 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Once again, I want to highlight the excellent quality of the work done by all employees at Chantier Davie, a supplier with which the Government of Canada works on a regular basis. We are working on this matter. We understand the importance and the strategic role of Chantier Davie. We are aware of the importance of Chantier Davie to its region. We will be able to make additional announcement shortly.

2 p.m.

Bloc

Julie Vignola Bloc Beauport—Limoilou, QC

This is not the first time that companies have tried to block the awarding of shipbuilding contracts to Chantier Davie. A person representing one of those companies even said, after losing a contract because it was not able to provide the ship, that it could do so in 2029. Now, I just met with James Davies, who told me that he can deliver the ship in 2027, if he gets the contract quickly.

When will Chantier Davie and its employees finally have the pleasure of building the icebreaker?