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House of Commons Hansard #102 of the 39th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was identification.

Topics

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the members of the Bloc Québécois are again making inflammatory remarks. This contract will benefit not only Quebec, but all of Canada.

The objective is to procure suitable equipment for our military rather than leasing it or purchasing fictitious goods.

The House leader of the Bloc Québécois said on Monday, “—we will no longer have to pay for Canada's planes, we will buy our own and have them made where we see fit”. I wonder where—

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques.

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Bloc Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, this afternoon, the Minister of Public Works, whom the Prime Minister had to appoint as a senator so that the Montreal area would be well represented in cabinet, will sign a contract that is detrimental to Quebec's aerospace industry, a high-tech industry crucial to economic development in Montreal and Quebec.

Is that how this minister represents Montreal in cabinet, by ignoring Montreal's and Quebec's interests and blithely agreeing to irretrievably damage the Quebec industry?

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Colin Carrie ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, Industry Canada has been dealing with this policy on Canadian benefits for over 20 years now. The department has always allowed companies make investments in Canada based on the best business practices and what makes the most sense to them. We will continue with that policy to ensure that it is fair across this entire country.

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Bloc

Louise Thibault Bloc Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Public Works is washing his hands of this whole affair and claiming that his colleague, the industry minister, is responsible for regional benefits. But he also bears some responsibility as a signatory to the contract. He is also implicated in the damage to Quebec's aerospace industry and the loss of jobs in Quebec.

How can the Minister of Public Works dare claim to represent Quebec when he is nothing but the Prime Minister's fawning follower?

Aerospace IndustryOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, as usual, the Bloc Québécois is talking out of both sides of its mouth. The Minister of Public Works does his own homework and his own work for Quebec and Montreal. He will prove it this afternoon when he signs the contract. Quebec has a presence in our government and in our cabinet, with Michael Fortier.

This contract will benefit Quebec. Our system of government works well for Quebec and Montreal, with Michael Fortier at the helm in Montreal.

Young OffendersOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, there has been another backward justice announcement from the Conservative government showing that it has absolutely no interest in effective smart justice policy. The Youth Criminal Justice Act has been in force for three years and it is effective. Juvenile crime rates are falling across the country.

Why does the minister think he is more qualified to determine what penalties should be imposed on our youth offenders rather than our judges?

Young OffendersOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Fundy Royal New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member knows better than to think that we would comment on speculation, rumours or leaks. The government listens to Canadians. We have heard what they have said and we are committed to our commitments on strengthening the Youth Criminal Justice Act to promote fairness and effectiveness, and restore justice to our system.

Young OffendersOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Jennings Liberal Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives will never let facts get ahead of good scare tactics.

Canadians trust their judges far more than they do the Conservatives. Youth justice requires more appropriate measures designed to rehabilitate juvenile delinquents and help them re-enter the community.

The minister will accomplish nothing by creating lifelong criminals. When will he stop his unwarranted attacks on our judges and our justice system? When?

Young OffendersOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Fundy Royal New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

What Canadians have said loud and clear, Mr. Speaker, is that they have no faith whatsoever in the Liberal revolving door justice system. They want us to add deterrents and denunciation to the system. That is exactly what we are doing. I ask her to work with us to make our communities and our streets safer for all Canadians.

Child CareOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Liberal Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to child care, the Prime Minister never got the job done. Out of the 125,000 spaces that he promised Canadian families, he has not delivered one. He is zero for 125,000.

We all know that the Prime Minister has plagiarized the Liberal climate change initiatives. The Conservatives have plagiarized Liberal homelessness initiatives. When will the Prime Minister get to work and start delivering child care spaces that Canadian families and parents so desperately need?

Child CareOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Blackstrap Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

One thing, Mr. Speaker, that we will not plagiarize is their universal child care because our universal child care is exactly that. It is universal. It has provided dollars for each and every child under the age of six.

It should not be forgotten that the Liberals promised a national day care system. The kids who would benefit had kids of their own before the Liberals ever even got around to it.

Child CareOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Ruby Dhalla Liberal Brampton—Springdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, the member needs to check her facts because what the Conservatives have put forward is certainly not a universal day care plan. They cannot continue to check off child care as an accomplishment because the bottom line is that they never got the job done. They, rather, abandoned Canadian families with their taxable $25-a-week allowance.

They continue to ignore the advice of child care advocacy associations and provinces. Capital funding will not create new spaces.

On behalf of all Canadian parents and families, when will the government get to work and start creating child care spaces?

Child CareOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Blackstrap Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, the member knows quite well that we are working on that and it will be delivered in the spring.

Income TrustsOral Questions

February 2nd, 2007 / 11:45 a.m.

Conservative

Mike Wallace Conservative Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Governor of the Bank of Canada has given his support to the government's decision to tax income trusts.

Yesterday, the member for Markham—Unionville dismissed Governor Dodge's professional assessment, saying that the central bank governor works for the government and that he cannot possibly say the government is wrong.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance confirm that there was no change to the independent status of the Governor of the Bank of Canada and will she assure this House that there has been no interference or influence brought to bear on the governor or on the bank?

Income TrustsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Calgary Nose Hill Alberta

Conservative

Diane Ablonczy ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the finance critic for the Liberals knows very well that the Governor of the Bank of Canada is an independent officer.

He also knows that not only is the Governor of the Bank of Canada highly respected here in Canada but internationally as well. I expect that is why the Liberals appointed the Governor of the Bank of Canada and why the finance critic, who was a member of the cabinet, endorsed that appointment.

However, I can understand why the Liberals would be rather embarrassed, because the Governor of the Bank of Canada said that levelling the playing field for business was long overdue.

Instead of looking at the mirror, I guess some people just try to shoot the messenger.

JusticeOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies NDP Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Pickton trial has focused enormous attention on the tragedy of the missing women from Vancouver's downtown eastside. It raises deeply disturbing questions about why Canada's justice system failed and why it failed sex workers.

The recent parliamentary report shows the harmful effects of the law and yet the Prime Minister has dismissed it.

I am not asking the Minister of Justice to comment on the trial, but I am asking him to be clear about what the government will do to protect the health, safety and human rights of sex workers.

JusticeOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Fundy Royal New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the government is certainly sympathetic to everything that is taking place in that regard. We will of course take the time to review the report of the subcommittee on solicitation laws and its recommendations and we will respond in due course.

However, there can be no doubt that prostitution victimizes the vulnerable, typically women, and it forces those who have few choices into a world with even fewer choices.

JusticeOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies NDP Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have to say that vague assertions and sympathy will not change the reality.

I took Sereena Abotsway to vote. She died at age 32, never able to vote again because this House failed her, failed to change laws that could have protected her. I never want to wake up again to the news of a murdered street worker.

The federal government must come to terms with the contradictions of its position and recognize that law reform is urgently needed.

How much longer will the government ignore these women?

JusticeOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Fundy Royal New Brunswick

Conservative

Rob Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, we are listening to all stakeholders. There are many aspects to the problem of prostitution and ensuring the protection of those who work in the sex trade is a priority. However, the government does not feel that decriminalization is one of those appropriate responses.

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Liberal Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the minister stated that her office had contacted women's groups in Vancouver with three proposed meeting dates.

I will quote an e-mail sent to me yesterday from women's organizations. It reads:

What the Minister said in the House [Thursday] was incorrect. We had not been contacted by her office at the time her statement was made. We had not been offered dates on which we said we were unable to meet.

Contrary to the minister's accusation against me, will she apologize to this House for providing false information?

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Durham Ontario

Conservative

Bev Oda ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, my office had offered a date and, in fact, we were told the organization representatives could not be in attendance because they were going to be in New York City at that time.

We have now gone back and we are waiting for their reply on the new suggested dates.

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Liberal Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, the minister continues to do the same. I have evidence in the emails here. It is clear that the minister was the one deceiving and intentionally misleading the House yesterday, not me.

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Status of WomenOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Order, please. The hon. member cannot suggest that members are deliberately misleading the House. There is a procedure for doing that and we will not have it during question period. The hon. member will put her question forthwith.