House of Commons Hansard #256 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was veterans.

Topics

EthicsOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Winnipeg North Manitoba

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, it is important to recognize that there is a cost to security. The security agencies make the determinations on what is needed to protect the Prime Minister, as they have done for all prime ministers prior to the current Prime Minister. We follow their recommendations. The former commissioner has acknowledged that these costs are incurred as part of him being the Prime Minister.

The Prime Minister will continue to work with the commissioner to clear all future family vacations.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, since the minister was appointed to oversee foreign affairs, I have sent her many letters on Israel and Palestine. I have yet to receive a reply, not a single reply as of yet.

Does the government have a position on the labelling of products from illegal settlements? No reply. Will the government defend the rights of imprisoned Palestinian children, including Ahed Tamimi? No reply. Has the government raised concerns about threats to Palestinian villages like Susiya? No reply.

Why will the minister not answer our—

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Fredericton New Brunswick

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite knows that Canada is a steadfast ally and friend of Israel, and a friend of the Palestinian people. That is a long-standing policy of the Government of Canada.

If the member opposite is looking for a reply to correspondence she sent to the ministry, I am happy to speak with her on a whole range of issues. She knows she can come and find me at any time at the conclusion of question period today.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like the minister to respond to my letters. That would be a sign of respect for this institution. Her silence on these matters is unacceptable. Thousands of Canadians are also calling on her to raise questions on human rights in Israeli-Palestinian relations. Canada is refusing to condemn the U.S. decision on Jerusalem and is refusing to act on the issue of settlements.

Does the minister realize that Canadians want their government to defend justice and human rights?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Fredericton New Brunswick

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, promoting and protecting human rights are an integral part of our foreign policy in all our relations. As I just said, Canada's long-standing position is that the status of Jerusalem can be resolved only as part of a general settlement of the dispute between the two parties. To answer my colleague's question directly, that has been the Government of Canada's long-standing position. Naturally, we remain at my colleague's disposal to answer any questions she may have.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

Erin O'Toole Conservative Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the last election, the Prime Minister promised he would never force veterans into court. He also promised a return to lifetime pensions for all our injured veterans.

Once elected, he broke that promise, forcing Equitas veterans back to court. He broke his promise on lifetime pensions. Yesterday, in Edmonton, he blamed veterans for asking for too much money.

When will the Prime Minister admit that he lied to veterans to win their vote in the last election, or will he admit that he did not cost, understand, or care about the promises he made to veteran families?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we appreciate all that veterans do to maintain peace and keep Canadians safe. Our government took immediate action to address a number of the issues raised, including increasing pain and suffering compensation and the income replacement benefit.

Veterans asked for a pension for life option, and we delivered. We will make a monthly, non-taxable payment for life, and we will significantly simplify the benefit system.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Conservative

Erin O'Toole Conservative Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, now we know why veterans call the new minister “the bad news reader”.

In the last election, the Prime Minister made promises, promises to win the election that he clearly either did not cost or understand. He said that he would not take veterans back to court; he did. He said “life pensions” for all and then said “no.”

There is a question here. Did the Prime Minister of Canada knowingly lie to veterans and Canadians, or did he not care that he was making promises he could not keep?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, there are few things I have learned in my short time as minister. One of them is the incredible amnesia that seems to exist on the other side of the House. One would think that some foreign body or some alien species had been in government for 10 years. Under the 10 years on the watch of the Conservatives, when veterans came home, what did they come home to? Broken promises, closed offices, and ignored voices.

We have delivered, finally, on a pension for life. We will continue to do the right thing by our veterans.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

Mr. Speaker, last night, in Edmonton, the Prime Minister said that the reason the government is still fighting certain veterans groups in court is that they are asking for more than the government is able to give.

In fact, veterans are only asking for what the Prime Minister promised them—the same Prime Minister who has no problem racking up huge billion-dollar deficits year after year.

Why did the Prime Minister deceive veterans?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have delivered on a pension for life. It is monthly; it is tax free.

I have spent the better part of three, four months criss-crossing the country and finally listening to veterans. What do they say? One thing they have resented over the past 10 years—

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Order, please. I want to remind the members that this is a question and answer period. It is not a discussion period where everybody jumps in at the same time. I would like to hear what the minister has to reply.

I will leave it at that and let the minister continue.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan Liberal St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, in this place, I know words are used, but words are not enough. On this side, finally, we have taken action for our veterans.

While I have heard others say such things as “shell game” when it comes money, $10 billion of new money for our veterans is no shell game. That is real money—

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. member for Barrie—Innisfil.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

Know what is not enough, Mr. Speaker? The act is not enough to our veterans.

Last night in Edmonton, the Prime Minister said “Why are we still fighting certain veterans groups in court? Because they're asking for more than we are able to give right now.” Actually, Mr. Prime Minister, veterans are asking for what you promised them.

He has no problem with billions in deficits, billions to the United Nations, billions more for his pet projects, and handing $10 million to Omar Khadr. Is it really, Mr. Prime Minister, that veterans are asking for more than you can give, or is it more than you care to give veterans?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

I want to remind hon. members to place their questions through the Chair and not directly to someone else in the chamber.

The hon. Minister of Veterans Affairs.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

February 2nd, 2018 / 11:40 a.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I wish I could look at the other side and only accuse them of inaction, but I could not do that, not when the Conservatives cut budgets for veterans, not when they closed offices time and again, and not when they ignored the voices of veterans.

We, as a government, in two and half years, have put forward $10 billion in new money. We have offered and given a pension for life, tax-free, to our veterans. We are keeping the promise that all sides in the House gave in 2006 under our new veterans charter. We are not sitting on our hands; we are taking action, finally.

Canadian Food Inspection AgencyOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach NDP Salaberry—Suroît, QC

Mr. Speaker, in 2016, between 3% and 5% of seafood imported into Canada was inspected by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. In light of the fact that millions of fish were killed by a toxic spill in Vietnam in April 2016, did the Minister of Health ask the agency to specifically monitor seafood from Vietnam after the disaster?

What tests were carried out and how much of the seafood from this country was tested?

Canadian Food Inspection AgencyOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Moncton—Riverview—Dieppe New Brunswick

Liberal

Ginette Petitpas Taylor LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for her question. All food imported into Canada must meet Canadian standards and comply with regulations. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has a robust monitoring and inspection program for imported fish and seafood. When the CFIA determines that a product may represent a risk to Canadians' health, it takes immediate action to protect consumers. The agency increases the monitoring of imported goods based on its own inspections and knowledge of problems in countries, including Vietnam.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Richard Cannings NDP South Okanagan—West Kootenay, BC

Mr. Speaker, a recent report has revealed that a profitable Canadian mining company operates in Mongolia but uses a tax haven in Luxembourg. This company avoided paying Canadian taxes of $690 million and deprived Mongolia of $230 million. It only paid Luxembourg $89 million, where it has one part-time employee. However, wait for it. It is completely legal, because this company received written approval from the CRA to avoid paying Canadian taxes.

How can the minister defend this sweetheart deal to the Canadians who are paying their fair share?

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to fighting tax evasion and aggressive tax avoidance abroad to ensure that we have a system that is fair for all Canadians. This is a global issue, and that is why Canada is working closely with its international partners, including the OECD, to improve the exchange of information. As a result of the investments in the last two budgets, the agency is now in a position to carry out an annual assessment of the risks related to activities of major multinationals. As my colleague knows very well, I cannot comment on specific cases.

ScienceOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Liberal Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, with world-class institutions like Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Sunnybrook Hospital, and Glendon College in my riding, I often engage with scientists and other researchers working on exciting breakthroughs that will improve the lives of Canadians. I am pleased to hear from them that Canada is now being viewed as a leader in science and learning around the world and many of their international counterparts want to work in Canada.

Could the Minister of Science tell the House what our government is doing to recruit top international talent?

ScienceOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Etobicoke North Ontario

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan LiberalMinister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Don Valley West for his strong support of research.

Canadians can be proud that the world is looking to Canada as a leader in science. We are an open, diverse, inclusive country that is committed to supporting science, and the world has noticed.

Thousands of top researchers from around the world want to come to Canada. We are investing $117 million to quickly recruit them to universities across the country. We have already welcomed the first round of researchers, and we look forward to the exciting discoveries they will make to help improve the lives of Canadians.