House of Commons Hansard #88 of the 44th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-5.

Topics

TigrayStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Denis Trudel Bloc Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, ethnic cleansing continues to claim thousands of lives in Tigray, Ethiopia.

Sexual violence is being used as a means to destroy Tigrayan women's reproductive capacity. Children are suffering the effects of armed violence and hunger because of a blockade imposed by Amhara militia groups and Ethiopian government forces.

While the war in Ethiopia threatens to destabilize the Horn of Africa, the Tigrayan diaspora in Canada and Quebec has been demanding for the past two years that the Canadian government impose sanctions on the Ethiopian government for crimes against humanity in Tigray.

We can only admire the courage of the members of United Tegaru Canada. These Tigrayan men and women are fighting hard for their cause while Canada turns a deaf ear. Tigrayans in Canada and Quebec have only one question for this government: When will it impose sanctions on the Ethiopian government and demand access to humanitarian aid for Tigrayans?

Anne BoutinStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Steven MacKinnon Liberal Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to pay tribute to Anne Boutin, who will celebrate her 35th anniversary this year as the executive director of Pointe aux jeunes youth centre in Gatineau, an organization that I visit often.

Ms. Boutin has dedicated her career to working with teens in the community. From the early days of her career, she has been determined to develop many bold and innovative projects that bring youth together and offer them a healthy, vibrant environment.

Ms. Boutin is steadfast and creative in her work, overseeing initiatives such as the Caravane à vélo, movies in the park, and winter coats for children in need.

On behalf of myself and all of my colleagues here in the House, I sincerely thank her for contributing so much to the youth of Gatineau. Happy 35th anniversary.

Canadian Environment WeekStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Tako Van Popta Conservative Langley—Aldergrove, BC

Mr. Speaker, in my riding of Langley—Aldergrove, we celebrate Canadian Environment Week by planting trees. They are mere seedlings now, but in the process of growing up, they will add beauty to our community and greening for the planet.

On Saturday, June 4, with the help of Langley Environmental Partners Society, we gave away 500 native tree seedlings. Admittedly, 500 trees is not nearly as impressive as the two billion trees the government keeps promising, but our trees are real trees. As they grow up, they will add real pleasure and contribute to the greening of our planet.

I want to thank our friends at LEPS Nichole, Carmen and Ben; my volunteers Jane, Jim and Elizabeth; and Home Depot for hosting us once again. Of course, I also want to thank the constituents in my riding for celebrating Environment Week in this very real and tangible way.

National Indigenous History MonthStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gary Anandasangaree Liberal Scarborough—Rouge Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, languages are at the core of who we are. They are the means through which we express ourselves and our culture, share stories and pass on knowledge throughout the generations. Languages are at the heart of our cultural identity and integral to our collective well-being. Since colonization, hundred of indigenous languages and dialects in Canada have been lost. According to UNESCO, 75% of the remaining 17 indigenous languages in Canada are endangered.

As we mark National Indigenous History Month, I want to thank the elders, knowledge keepers and teachers of indigenous languages. I want to honour the resilience of those who persevered to maintain these precious languages. As we continue to march toward reconciliation, I want to highlight the work of the recently appointed Commissioner of Indigenous Languages, Ronald Ignace, who is here in Ottawa today.

Let us work together to support indigenous people's right to self-determination and the right to maintain, reclaim and revitalize their languages as a fundamental tenet of reconciliation.

CDKL5 Awareness MonthStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Sameer Zuberi Liberal Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, June is CDKL5 Awareness Month.

Amelia is a five-year-old resident in my riding. She is a young girl in Pierrefonds—Dollard who suffers from this rare disease. CDKL5 is a neurodevelopmental condition caused by a rare gene mutation. It also is one of the most common forms of genetic epilepsy among young girls.

Amelia lives with this disorder, and it is an honour to talk about her bravery here today.

Amelia's parents have been making her home accessible for her, fundraising so that her home is safe. Throughout it all, Amelia has been cheerful, spreading love and joy all around her. CDKL5 Awareness Month's motto is, “Hope. Love. Cure.” I encourage Canadians to learn about this disorder during this month.

Saskatchewan Oil and Gas ShowStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Robert Gordon Kitchen Conservative Souris—Moose Mountain, SK

Mr. Speaker, on June 1 and 2, the city of Weyburn hosted the Saskatchewan Oil and Gas Show 2022. The event was a resounding success, with people coming from all over the country to see and learn about the latest developments in Canada's vital oil industry. I send my congratulations and thanks to the chair, Dan Cugnet, and all of the organizing committee.

Unfortunately, one topic often discussed was the astronomical price of gas and the negative impacts it is having on the people of Saskatchewan. With the current price of gas hovering over $2 per litre, people in rural areas are going to have to start choosing between things like driving to work that week or putting food on the table.

The people of Souris—Moose Mountain deserve more than a Liberal government that sits by and watches them suffer while refusing to use the tools they have available to fix the situation. My constituents and all Canadians deserve a break. While the Prime Minister continually says he has Canadians' backs, the only thing he has done is twist their backs to the verge of breaking.

Pride SeasonStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Francesco Sorbara Liberal Vaughan—Woodbridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, no matter the age, rainbows are a symbol of hope, peace, equality, luck and new beginnings, and throughout Pride Season, we see the rainbow flag proudly displayed across Canada, because Pride is a time to celebrate our differences and, yes, support one another.

This Pride Season, we join the LGBTQ+ community across Canada. We acknowledge their history, the hardships they have endured and the progress that has been made while recommitting ourselves to continue building more inclusive communities where everyone is free to be who they are and love whom they love.

This evening, youth from across the 905 region will come together to celebrate Pride Season in a conversation with our Minister of Tourism, and after a two-year hiatus, this Saturday, June 18, residents across York Region will join York Pride to celebrate Pride on the Riverwalk and walk the York Pride dream. I hope to see members there.

Happy Pride Season, everyone. Love is love.

Hockey ExcellenceStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Earl Dreeshen Conservative Red Deer—Mountain View, AB

Mr. Speaker, from the rolling ranch and farmland in Viking, Alberta, came a band of brothers who changed the hockey world forever. They all began their junior careers with our Red Deer Rustlers in the 1970s and 1980s before moving on to the WHL's Lethbridge Broncos. Their exceptional talents on the ice were only surpassed by their unique knowledge of the game, with four of the boys continuing on to ply their trade as managers and coaches.

Last week, the NHL Broadcasters Association voted Calgary Flames coach Darryl Sutter as a recipient of this year's Jack Adams Award as NHL coach of the year. Darryl took a team that had missed the playoffs the year before to sixth place this year.

In typical Darryl fashion, his reaction to the news was to thank family first and then remind everyone how proud he was that his brother, Brian, who had won the same award as a young coach in the 1990s, was the one to break the news to him. Whether at the rodeo grounds, working the land or behind the bench, Darryl's unique philosophy of life and excellence always shine through.

On behalf of hockey fans everywhere, we congratulate Darryl Sutter on his well-deserved award.

Tribute to a FatherStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Shelby Kramp-Neuman Conservative Hastings—Lennox and Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, “Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, Or what's a heaven for?” That is my father's favourite quote.

Daryl Kramp was first elected as a member of Parliament in 2004 and he served until 2015. He then went on to serve as our MPP from 2018 to 2022.

My dad is a thinker, a compassionate leader, a statesman and a man of his word. He is competitive in nature, steadfast in his love of family and has earned the respect of many. In his time in office, he and his team made a huge impact on the lives of many. He has delivered millions of dollars to our riding. He has proudly represented Canada abroad on many missions.

For all who know him, they can expect a firm handshake and for him to look them in the eye. He will ask hard but thoughtful questions. He will encourage people to evaluate the why. We can anticipate that the love of his life, Carol Ann, his firecracker, my mother, is always by his side and often leading the charge.

Today, I am proud to rise in the House to wish my dad and my mentor a very happy birthday. Also, to all of the dads out there, may they enjoy a very special Father's Day this weekend.

Youth in HochelagaStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Soraya Martinez Ferrada Liberal Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, I had the pleasure of meeting with children and youth from Hochelaga who are part of the committee on the rights of the child at the Dr. Julien Foundation's social pediatric centres, the Garage à musique and La Ruelle d'Hochelaga.

Out of the mouths of babes come words of truth and wisdom, so the saying goes, and I promised these young people that I would bring their voices and the ideas they shared with me to the House.

Here is what they said: Take care of people sleeping on the street and people in wheelchairs so they have access to buildings and streets; build more soccer fields and basketball courts; have more splash pads in parks and more swimming pools; create green neighbourhoods; tell people to pollute less and switch to cleaner vehicles; make parks and alleys safer; have adults listen to us more; and empower student councils to make decisions.

These children have spoken out on issues that are important to the people of Hochelaga and across the country. I urge all my colleagues to meet with youth and children in their ridings.

Service CanadaStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the 11 years that I have been a member of this House, I have never seen this before.

The government services currently being provided to the public are awful, a total disaster. People are lining up at 3:00 a.m. in the hopes of getting their passports. One woman in my riding has been waiting for her EI cheque since February. This is June. Has anyone here ever tried to speak with someone at Service Canada? You have a better chance of winning the lottery.

I know of one case involving a foreign-born nurse who is going to lose his work permit if the deadline for his permanent resident status is not met. Let me be clear. We risk losing a nurse from our health care system because Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada is not doing its job.

There are hundreds of cases like this. Our business owners are tearing their hair out, and people are living in uncertainty and anxiety. One of the essential duties of any government is to provide good services in a timely manner.

I am asking the Liberal government to get its act together and, out of respect for Canadians, allocate the resources needed to make things work.

René LévesqueStatements by Members

June 14th, 2022 / 2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Yves-François Blanchet Bloc Beloeil—Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, the word “dignity” is central to René Lévesque's legacy.

It is a dignity that is not always clear, but it takes on its full significance, even 35 years after his death and 100 years after his birth, when we take an inspiring look back at a time when Quebec values were solidified.

Yesterday, in Montreal, the Fondation René-Lévesque launched its commemoration of the centenary of his birth. The honorary president of the festivities is a prominent former leader from this Parliament, Lucien Bouchard, whom I salute.

At this event, we saw glimpses of what we each believe René Lévesque was like, based on the broad strokes of our shared understanding of his life. It is a life that looms large for my generation, but it is unknown to those for whom René Lévesque is merely a black-and-white photo in a book about a history that is no longer taught.

What a wonderful opportunity to teach young people about this giant, a man like no other, whose love for Quebeckers was so profound that he sacrificed everything to try to give them a country of their own.

“The future lasts a long time”, he would say. It is just beginning for Quebec, thanks to René Lévesque.

Government PoliciesStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Pat Kelly Conservative Calgary Rocky Ridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, airports are in chaos. The passport office is snowed under. Inflation is out of control. Ministers are misleading Parliament. The government's current priorities are an incoherent mess.

Bill C-5 would drop sentencing requirements on violent offenders and drug traffickers and open the door for sex offenders to serve community sentences near their victims. Bill C-21 pretends to address gun violence, but literally only affects people who obey Canada's existing strict firearms laws. Bill C-19 would remove any pretense of fiscal control from the undisciplined and unserious government. Bill C-11 is a bill that would give the CRTC the power to control what Canadians find and post on the Internet. None of these bills would do anything to fix any of Canada's serious problems.

If these are the government's priorities for the next two weeks, I suggest it quit now and spend the summer coming up with a real agenda to help Canadians.

Retirement CongratulationsStatements by Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Liberal Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am rising today to recognize my constituent and a long-time dedicated employee of the House of Commons.

Mr. Claude St-Germain, assistant sergeant-at-arms and risk management and investigations officer, is retiring after 35 years of outstanding service. Mr. St-Germain joined the House of Commons security services on September 21, 1987, moving to Ottawa from his hometown of Sudbury.

Over the years, Claude rose through the ranks of the House of Commons Security Services, where he served as sergeant of the civilian unit before joining the Office of the Sergeant-at-Arms.

His professionalism, dedication, commitment, kindness and vast knowledge of this place is deeply appreciated and will be greatly missed.

I ask all hon. members to join me in thanking Claude for 35 years of unfailing and dedicated service.

Retirement CongratulationsStatements by Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Before going to Oral Questions, I want to remind all hon. members that we cannot do indirectly what we cannot do directly. If there is anything in their questions or answers, I would ask them to scratch it out now before I have to act. It will make my life a lot easier.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Portage—Lisgar Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, Canadians should be able to trust that what their government tells them is the truth. Telling the truth is especially important when setting the serious precedent of invoking the Emergencies Act. We now know the Minister of Public Safety has been misleading Canadians. No police force asked for the act. He knows it. We all know it. There was no misunderstanding. The minister has lost credibility and trust.

Will the Prime Minister do the right thing and ask the Minister of Public Safety to step away from his duties?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, when illegal blockades paralyzed our economy and hurt workers and communities, police, municipal and provincial leadership told us more tools were needed to bring them to an end. The former Ottawa police chief said at the time, “We cannot do it alone” and “We are grateful for what they provided, but we need more.” Even Alberta's Minister of Municipal Affairs wrote that the local RCMP “have exhausted all local and regional options.” We listened. We determined that the Emergencies Act had the tools necessary to end this and it worked.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Portage—Lisgar Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, there is no misunderstanding, and this is too important to try to skew the words. This is vitally important.

No police officers or agencies asked for the act to be invoked. The Minister of Public Safety said that they did. He was not telling the truth. He misled Canadians. He cannot be trusted. He has lost the confidence of this House to do his job.

Has he lost the confidence of the Prime Minister? Will the Prime Minister ask him to resign?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, let us be very clear. Law enforcement should never be able to grant itself extraordinary powers. That is up to government to choose to do, as we did with the Emergencies Act.

Once in place, the Emergencies Act allowed police to, according to the commissioner of the RCMP, refuse entry of individuals travelling to the illegal protest with the intent of participating. It gave police “the power to arrest individuals who continue to supply fuel, food and other materials and to compel individuals to provide essential towing services”. Canadians remember how—

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Portage—Lisgar Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the minister has abdicated and failed in his responsibility to be truthful with Canadians. He is a lawyer and a former federal prosecutor. He knows full well how to choose his words carefully. He knows full well how to be precise in his language, yet he said over and over again that law enforcement requested the Emergencies Act. Those were his words. We now know his words were not true.

How can the Prime Minister have any faith in the minister? Will he ask the minister to resign?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, what is crystal clear is how much the Conservative Party is hoping Canadians forget that the Conservatives stood with the illegal blockaders and that they stood with the people disrupting the daily lives, the economy and the communities of Canadians from coast to coast to coast.

Police services needed more tools to deal with these blockades, and that is why we stepped up to protect Canadians. We invoked the Emergencies Act, and it worked to end the illegal blockades and keep Canadians safe.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Portage—Lisgar Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, our responsibility is to stand up for Canadians who have been misled by the minister.

Canadians were shocked and disgusted to learn that last weekend, the Minister of Foreign Affairs sent one of her delegates to share champagne and caviar with Russian diplomats. While Putin and his thugs continue an unjustified and violent war on innocent civilians in Ukraine, can the Prime Minister tell us how, in the name of everything that is good, did he allow this to happen? We are supposed to be friends of Ukraine. Why did his minister send one of her delegates to party with Russian diplomats, who are still being allowed to stay in Canada?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, not a half an hour ago, I got off a 45-minute phone call with President Volodymyr Zelenskyy to talk about everything Canada has been doing and will continue to do, including leading conversations at the Summit of the Americas last week, and continuing to deliver on toughened sanctions and on more equipment and ammunition. We will continue to step up to support Ukraine.

Obviously, it was absolutely unacceptable for any Canadian representative to be at this event. It never should have happened, and we denounce it thoroughly.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Portage—Lisgar Manitoba

Conservative

Candice Bergen ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, his minister is either incompetent or complicit in what happened, maybe both. Either way, it is a complete failure on behalf of the Liberals. Canadians expect that their Minister of Foreign Affairs will lead by example, by condemning and isolating Putin's regime, not sending senior officials to party at the Russian embassy.

The Prime Minister and his foreign affairs minister claim to be great friends of Ukraine. I hope he apologized to President Zelenskyy, because what kind of friend sends a delegate to their enemy's house to enjoy champagne and caviar?