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Science and Research committee  I would add that Canada is already a destination of choice for international students. When a student from the Saint-Jean campus of the University of Alberta begins their studies in French, they quickly realize that English has a very strong pull. The idea is therefore not to attract these students, but to retain them in the francophonie.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  In my opinion, there are two important elements. The first is research on linguistic minorities. The second is holding events in person or online and promoting and supporting publications, two things that contribute to the vitality of research in French. We are focusing on research.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  How the story ends is that it takes professor/researchers who are able to promote academic research in French to their students. If there are no professors who can teach or supervise students' work in French, the message we are sending is not spoken, it is lived. Why not include a language incentive when filling out a grant application that wants to know what is going to be done with the money, what is going to be published, and which student or postdoctoral researcher is going to be supervised?

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  I am going to add to my colleagues' remarks and dare to be bold: why not extend the scope of section 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms to the postsecondary level? That would be a start.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  Mr. Perreault, do you mind if I add a comment? I am going to take the example of the Netherlands, where representation is important. If a majority of teaching is done in English, that sends the message to students that research and scientific activity happen in English. That is not the right message to send to Dutch speakers who are studying in English.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  I would like to add that the government could also offer incentives for courses to be given in both official languages and for professors who are able to teach and supervise students' work in both official languages to do so. At present, when you are a francophone or bilingual student, the burden...

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  I would simply like to add that having a shared language does not necessarily mean that we have a common culture and common concerns. It is really important to get to collaborate within the international francophonie. However, we must not forget that social, identity and cultural challenges are also important, and we cannot simply let the entire burden fall on the international francophonie.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  Thank you for the question. The first of the two journals I edit is called Arborescences. Its home base is the French Studies Department at the University of Toronto. In fact, I co-edit it with a professor at the university. It is a journal of French-language literary, linguistic and pedagogical studies that focuses specifically on French and francophone studies.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  If I may, I'll make my response bilingual for the purpose of tonight's discussion. Usually, a researcher who publishes in one language is discouraged from publishing the same article in the other language. It would essentially be considered self-plagiarism. That means that if you publish an article in French on a specific subject in a particular journal, the article might not be published in English.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve

Science and Research committee  Thank you for your question. When you publish in the humanities and social sciences, it is often easier to disseminate your work in the majority language, English, than to do it in French. Obviously, it depends on the research subjects. When you are working on the francophonie, you can publish your work in French more easily.

October 3rd, 2022Committee meeting

Anne-José Villeneuve