An Act to amend the Citizenship Act (Oath or Affirmation of Citizenship)

This bill was last introduced in the 37th Parliament, 1st Session, which ended in September 2002.

Sponsor

John Bryden  Liberal

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Not active, as of Sept. 19, 2001
(This bill did not become law.)

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Committees of the House
Routine Proceedings

April 17th, 2002 / 3:30 p.m.
See context

Liberal

John Bryden Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. It is probably appropriate on this 20th anniversary of the charter of rights and freedoms to seek unanimous consent to make Bill C-391 votable, which the Speaker will remember would amend the oath of citizenship to reflect the principles of the charter.

If I may, Mr. Speaker, I would like to just read what the new oath would say so that the members can--

Excise Act, 2001
Government Orders

March 22nd, 2002 / 1:25 p.m.
See context

Liberal

John Bryden Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I apologize to the member opposite for interrupting him, but this is an opportunity that I would like to bring forward to seek unanimous consent to make my private member's bill, Bill C-391, votable.

The member who was speaking will appreciate that it is very difficult to make bills votable. This is a bill that would amend the oath of citizenship and bring in the principles of the charter of rights and liberties. I would seek that unanimous consent.

Citizenship Act
Routine Proceedings

September 19th, 2001 / 4:15 p.m.
See context

Liberal

John Bryden Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot, ON

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-391, an act to amend the Citizenship Act (Oath or Affirmation of Citizenship).

Mr. Speaker, this bill has as its purpose to change the current oath of citizenship which simply says that we swear allegiance to Her Majesty the Queen, the Queen of Canada, and swear to faithfully fulfil our duties as Canadian citizens.

I have many times tried to change the oath of citizenship because I feel very passionately that it should reflect the values that we hold dear as Canadians. The oath that I am proposing in the bill reflects the charter of rights and liberties.

With your indulgence, Mr. Speaker, I would like to just read the text of the oath that I propose. I will read the affirmation rather than the oath itself. What I am proposing is an affirmation of citizenship that says the following:

In pledging allegiance to Canada, I take my place among Canadians, a people united by their solemn trust to uphold these five principles: equality of opportunity, freedom of speech, democracy, basic human rights and the rule of law.

I think, Mr. Speaker, that this is a very timely occasion on which to introduce a new oath of citizenship.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)