Credit Card Charge Adjustment Act

An Act respecting the adjustment of credit card charges in cases where goods or services are not supplied or are defective

This bill was last introduced in the 37th Parliament, 1st Session, which ended in September 2002.

Sponsor

Ted White  Canadian Alliance

Introduced as a private member’s bill. (These don’t often become law.)

Status

Not active, as of Jan. 31, 2002
(This bill did not become law.)

Elsewhere

All sorts of information on this bill is available at LEGISinfo, provided by the Library of Parliament. You can also read the full text of the bill.

Credit Card Charge Adjustment Act
Routine Proceedings

January 31st, 2002 / 10:25 a.m.
See context

Canadian Alliance

Ted White North Vancouver, BC

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-427, an act respecting the adjustment of credit card charges in cases where goods or services are not supplied or are defective.

Mr. Speaker, in the United States it is law that when a credit card company signs on a new merchant it is deemed to be a contract with the merchant that shares in the profits of the corporation. The credit card company takes a commission for every sale the company makes. That means that in the United States under the law if the company providing the service fails to deliver, the credit card company has a responsibility to help get the money back for the credit card customer. That law does not exist in Canada.

If implemented, my private member's bill would create an even playing field in Canada by making our law compatible with that of the United States. If companies failed to deliver on goods and services that had been charged to a credit card, the credit card company would have some responsibility in regaining redress and a refund.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)