House of Commons Hansard #91 of the 35th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was yukon.

Topics

Charles Munroe
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

John Finlay Oxford, ON

Mr. Speaker, on Sunday, June 19, Mr. Charles Munroe, a lifelong resident of Oxford county, was formally inducted into the Ontario Agricultural Hall of Fame.

He began his service to agriculture as the president of the Oxford Junior Farmers in 1941. Over the ensuing years he became president of the Oxford Holstein Breeders, president of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture and president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture. Finally in 1972 to 1974 he served as president of the International Federation of Agriculture in Paris, France.

It is obvious that Mr. Munroe has committed his life to working for the farmers of Canada and the world. He has participated in many international meetings from Tel Aviv to Tokyo on behalf of Canadian farmers. The accomplishments of this man deserve not only the recognition of the agricultural community but of all Canadians. Indeed he is a recipient of the Canada Centennial Medal.

On behalf of all members of Parliament I congratulate Charlie Munroe on this prestigious and well deserved honour.

International Crossing Of Lake Memphremagog
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Gaston Péloquin Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, the international crossing of Lake Memphremagog is a major tourist attraction in my riding of Brome-Missisquoi. The sixteenth crossing, to be held from July 15 to 24, will be an important event and a major challenge, both because of the competitive aspect and the quality and number of participants involved.

I am confident that the 400 or so volunteers involved in the preparations along with the organizing committee will continue a long tradition of excellence that has always been characteristic of this world class event.

I urge all Canadians and Quebecers to come and share the excitement when the best long-distance swimmers in the world, who meet every summer in Magog, take up the challenge to swim across Lake Memphremagog.

Time Allocation
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, last night I witnessed a true wake up call in the House as the Liberal government abused closure provisions in order to hasten its summer holiday.

The Liberals across the way promised Canadians during the last election that things would be different when they were in power. They called for integrity in the system yet last night all we witnessed was a return to the Mulroney strong arm tactics of the past.

When will Canada have a real democratic government, dedicated to the people? When will we see an end to the policy of closed doors, hidden agendas and business as usual?

Total disrespect for democracy by imposing closure has to be a low moment in the House. The people of Canada reel at the thought of Mulroney style politics as usual and will show the government their disgust at the polls in the future.

Immigration
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Gar Knutson Elgin—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to rise in the House today, on June 22, to recognize this day which marks the 125th anniversary of Canada's first Immigration Act and the creation of Canada's immigration service.

I am honoured to be representing the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration while he participates in a special commemorative ceremony at the Palais des congrès in Hull. The minister is marking this anniversary with a special permanent residents and

citizenship court ceremony demonstrating the vital link between immigration and citizenship which his new department symbolizes.

On behalf of all Canadians I pay tribute to the dedicated employees who serve today and to the pioneers of yesterday who helped build our nation through immigration starting 125 years ago today.

Battle Of Normandy
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Ivan Grose Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is from one generation to another. Fifty years ago a battle of unimaginable ferocity was fought on the beaches of Normandy, a battle that will be talked about for a thousand years to come, one which will be known as the bravest day.

We live in freedom and prosperity today as a generation of ordinary Canadians who have never known the anguish of war and separation wish to say something to that generation who were there. We wish to say that we remember. We wish to thank them for their courage, their sacrifice and their deed.

This message of gratitude comes from ordinary people who have realized that to let this occasion pass without a salute to them would be a sad oversight which would surely bewilder generations to come. Whatever battles are left to be fought, let us all hope that the greatest one is now behind us.

This was written by Gary Hesketh to his father, a veteran and my friend, Red Hesketh, and inserted as a full page ad in the Toronto Star on June 6, 1994.

The Golden Temple
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Colleen Beaumier Brampton, ON

Mr. Speaker, this month Sikhs around the world are commemorating the 10th anniversary of the tragic army assault against their holiest shrine, the Golden Temple.

In 1984 the Golden Temple and 37 other historic and religious places were destroyed by aggressive army assaults. The Sikh nation calls those who were killed martyrs, and on the 10th anniversary of this tragedy I call upon all members of the House to pay homage to thousands of innocent people, including women, children and seniors killed during these attacks.

Agriculture
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Paul Marchand Québec-Est, QC

Mr. Speaker, contrary to what Ottawa claims, our agricultural policies are not in disarray because of international commitments. The federal government is to blame.

The Liberal government reduced farm subsidies to meet GATT requirements, when we had already met our commitments. The same government is giving in to demands from the Americans with respect to foreign trade.

We must stimulate the agricultural sector and do so through carefully considered action. Changes in the Crow rate should reflect equal treatment of eastern and western producers. The Liberal government should declare a one-year moratorium on sales of the BST hormone, and any concessions made on the international scene should be met with benefits for Canadian producers. That is how a responsible government should prepare for agriculture 2000.

Time Allocation
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Bob Ringma Nanaimo—Cowichan, BC

Mr. Speaker, I want to begin with a quote: "Government must be judged by its effectiveness in promoting human dignity, justice, fairness and opportunity".

Nice words but I am afraid their meaning is hollow. Those words come from the Prime Minister in the fabled red book. Unfortunately last night the government showed that the words were only rhetoric. By invoking closure on several key pieces of legislation the government showed its true colours.

How does closing off debate serve the purpose of justice, fairness or opportunity? If anyone in Canada had any remaining doubts about the role of the Bloc Quebecois as the Official Opposition, those doubts went out the window last evening.

Did the Official Opposition stand up for freedom and for all Canadians? It did not. Now all Canadians can see the Bloc Quebecois Party for what it truly is. Both the government and the Bloc Quebecois can share in last night's shame.

Military Bands
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to protest a recent decision by the Department of National Defence concerning the status of pipers in the bands of the 15 highland regiments of the Canadian militia.

The removal of pipers from the militia role and the likely damage caused by this to many fine bands like that of the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders in Winnipeg or the Black Watch in Montreal is a sad and infuriating attack on a good tradition and on the morale of these regiments and their supporters.

No such requirement has been laid on brass bands. I call on the Minister of National Defence to reverse this discriminatory foolish decision. The Black Watch Pipe Band is a well loved Canadian institution in Montreal. Liberals should protect it instead of being up to their old tricks and trying to eliminate anything that smacks of British tradition.

Habitat For Humanity
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Andrew Telegdi Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to inform the House that Catherine and Ron Hewson are cycling across Canada and have a support team of Irene and Jake Pauls travelling with them. The cross-Canada cycling trip started on May 28 in St. John's, Newfoundland, and they will reach Victoria, British Columbia, on July 29.

These young Canadians are from my riding. They are giving of their time and energies to promote Habitat for Humanity. Habitat for Humanity Canada was established in 1985 and now has 22 established affiliates in six provinces. More than 29 new affiliates are also forming in other provinces.

Habitat for Humanity is an ecumenical Christian housing ministry seeking to eliminate poverty housing world-wide and to make decent shelter a matter of conscience and action.

I am pleased the Canadian headquarters for this excellent organization is located in Waterloo under the able leadership of Wilmer Martin. It is examples like these that make Canada a great place to live.

Employment
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Geoff Regan Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, I remind the House of the government's strong commitment to job creation for Canadians and ensuring that Canadians get first crack at opportunities.

A case in point is the Nordic Challenger , a shuttle tanker which moves oil from offshore Nova Scotia to Canadian and foreign ports. It is operated by Lasmo Nova Scotia Limited. In past years the crew aboard this vessel consisted solely of foreign workers. In April of this year the exemption for the use of foreign workers aboard the vessel came up for renewal.

In spite of Lasmo's attempts to justify the hiring of only 12 Canadians, the government stood firm and refused to extend the exemption. The previous government routinely renewed the exemption, claiming it was acting for the benefit of the economy.

The government's major priority is jobs for Canadians. That is why the Minister of Human Resources Development and the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration stood up for Canadian workers and refused to allow foreign interest to carry the day.

Immigration
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

John Cannis Scarborough Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the recent announcement that changes are now being made to the immigrant determination process should be cheered by all Canadians. This first step is a valuable tool in making the system more accountable to the Canadian public. It maintains and protects Canada's traditional role as a country for those truly seeking a new beginning.

Accusations are rife that the minister had a knee-jerk reaction to the recent events portrayed in the media. This is not the case. Rather these amendments are well thought out and the result of our government's ongoing commitment to the consultation as outlined in the red book. These amendments give us the tools to turn away those who wish to abuse Canada's generosity.

I commend the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration for his hard work and effort on the part of all Canadians and the introduction of his timely amendment.

Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Anna Terrana Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, June 24 is Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day, the day on which we honour the patron saint of the city of Montreal. Today, both personally and on behalf of my constituents of Vancouver East, I would like to wish all Quebecers a happy holiday.

As a native of Turin, Italy, a city which shares the same patron saint, I know how important holidays like this are. I hope that June 24 will be a happy day for all Quebecers and I also hope that it will be celebrated together by all, as Canadians, in the years to come.

From my home on the Pacific coast all the way to the Atlantic coast and from the American border to the North Pole, Canadians want to strengthen the ties that bind Canada's provinces and territories and work together to resolve their problems and foster a more acceptable climate for all. As the saying goes, united we stand and united we must remain.

Happy Saint-Jean-Baptiste day to all Canadians.

Canadian Peacekeepers
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Maurice Godin Châteauguay, QC

Mr. Speaker, the war in Croatia claimed another victim yesterday. Corporal Mark Robert Isfield was killed when he stepped on a land mine. His senseless death leaves us with even less hope today that the warring factions will finally lay down their arms. Often, the loss

of a loved one brings home the full extent of the horror being experienced by those at war in the former Yugoslavia.

Canadian peacekeepers in this region of the world play a vital role in efforts to have all parties find a peaceful solution to their long-standing differences. It is a paradox that these soldiers should be working tirelessly for peace in the midst of such a bloody conflict. Those who have known war often say that there are no heros, only victims and those who are left behind. Today this soldier is the victim, while we are the ones left behind.

On behalf of all the members of this House, I want to extend my deepest sympathies to the victim's family.

Time Allocation
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Grant Hill Macleod, AB

Mr. Speaker, a valued friend of mine has quietly passed away, unheralded by jaded media, shunted aside by cynical forces, a battered veteran, a hero of past battles. This poem expresses my sorrow:

You fought the fight When weaker forces paled. You stood for freedom When others shrank and failed. Your final days will never be forlorn. We mourn your passing, The flag is rent and torn.

Yes, closure crushes the life from democracy. We mourn, we mourn, we mourn.