House of Commons Hansard #18 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was co-operatives.

Topics

France-Quebec Agreement On Collection Of Support Payments
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Saint-Laurent—Cartierville
Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Dion President of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have to come up with an agreement that provides Quebeckers with good services.

Thus, with the aim of signing an enforceable agreement, which therefore, in the opinion of both governments—the Canadian and the French governments—must be done within the rules of the Canada-France agreement, the Government of Quebec is invited to negotiate in good faith with the Government of Canada.

Environment
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the environment minister did not deny that the Kyoto treaty would cost Canadians 10¢, 20¢ or 30¢ more per litre of gasoline.

Today we would like the minister to tell Canadians how much more they will be paying to heat their homes this winter. Will it be $100, $200 or $300 more?

Environment
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Christine Stewart Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, to set the record straight, I said nothing about what it would cost individual Canadians to deal with this very important issue.

I did say that this is an issue when it comes to determining measures that will be done in consultation with all key players and the Canadian public. They will be aware of what is required to meet our target.

Environment
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Reform

Bill Gilmour Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, this is exactly the problem. The government is saying nothing about this issue.

The Liberal government will bankrupt Canadians with massive tax grabs. We hear about dialogue with the provinces. Yes, the provinces will sit at the table, but the minister has not answered the question that has been asked four times in the House.

Will she answer it now? Is the minister prepared to guarantee that all provinces will be on side before the Liberal tax grab treaty is signed in Kyoto?

Environment
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Northumberland
Ontario

Liberal

Christine Stewart Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, my provincial counterparts are aware of the fact that Canada is committed to legally binding targets in Kyoto. They know that I am in dialogue with them.

There are opportunities associated with what Canada will do. I would like to put another quote on the floor, this time from a chief executive of General Motors who says “We at General Motors are not afraid of a Kyoto summit. We welcome it because there will be global dialogue on a global problem. That's good but it means all of us have to sacrifice”.

Tobacco Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga—Maisonneuve, QC

Mr. Speaker, because a government refused to listen to the Bloc Quebecois members when its anti-tobacco legislation was being passed, it is now in the process of compromising the survival of the Montreal Grand Prix.

The clock is ticking for sports and cultural events, and I would therefore ask the Minister of Health the following question: When will his anti-tobacco legislation be amended? What are you waiting for, Mr. Minister?

Tobacco Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

The Speaker

I would remind my colleagues to always address the Chair.

Tobacco Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:35 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, as I said last week, we are in the process of preparing an amendment to the tobacco legislation. It is our intention to honour the commitment we made several months ago, and the amendment will be tabled when we are ready.

Tobacco Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Réal Ménard Hochelaga—Maisonneuve, QC

Mr. Speaker, at the present time, some major projects have been suspended at the Montreal Grand Prix site and those involved say that the Grand Prix will be finished, after 1998.

Does the minister realize that the delay resulting from his inaction is causing irreparable damage to the survival of the Montreal Grand Prix?

Tobacco Legislation
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Etobicoke Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Allan Rock Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, it is not helpful for the hon. member to put matters in those terms. I assure him that I have been involved in careful and methodical consultations with the people involved in Formula I in the Grand Prix, and we intend fully to respect the commitment we made some months ago. We will table the legislation when we are in a position to do so.

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the solicitor general said that he is not running the parole system. He later on said he is accountable for the national parole system. Which is it?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate very much not only the content but the tone of the question.

The national parole board operates independently and at arm's length from the government. The Government of Canada and the solicitor general are accountable for the decisions but we do not make them.

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, we will give him another day to think about an answer to that one.

Yesterday the minister said the parole system is running itself, that it is motivated by public interest and the interest of public safety.

Could the minister please explain releasing Larry Takahashi, a convicted serial rapist, when police are saying that he is a significant danger to society. How in the world can he explain that it is in the interest of public safety that he be released?

Justice
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, it is in the interest of public safety to gradually in a controlled way release inmates from the system, because the vast majority of people leave the system. It is that simple.

The success rate in terms of recidivism is much better in the case of a controlled and gradual release. That is a fact.

Tobacco Act
Oral Question Period

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Pauline Picard Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health cannot remain indifferent to the problems his anti-tobacco legislation is causing promoters of cultural and sporting events in Quebec, who have been left without a leg to stand on.

In light of the ambiguous statements made by the government during the last election campaign, could the minister tell us whether the changes to the anti-tobacco legislation promised by the Prime Minister apply only to the Montreal Grand Prix or to all cultural and sporting events jeopardized by this legislation?