House of Commons Hansard #28 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was children.

Topics

2 p.m.

The Speaker

As is our practice on Wednesday we will now sing O Canada , and we will be led by the hon. member for Edmonton East.

Winnipeg Boys And Girls Club
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Reg Alcock Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the attention of the House today to the Winnipeg Boys and Girls Club and its Floodbusters program.

After the flood that Winnipeg suffered this summer, the department of human resources and the Winnipeg Boys and Girls Club got together and organized a program that hired 193 students. They worked all summer long cleaning up properties and helping homeowners repair their homes. They removed some 400,000 sandbags. They ran a summer camp for kids displaced by the flood so their parents could work on their properties. When the Red Cross was having trouble getting relief out, 12 members of the Floodbusters team worked with the Red Cross to ensure people got the compensation they needed.

The program was run by Mike Owens, executive director of the Winnipeg Boys and Girls Club, and Heather Popoff who actually directed the program. They did a superb job. I would like all members of the House to congratulate them.

Sports
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Jim Abbott Kootenay—Columbia, BC

Mr. Speaker, why strike a subcommittee to study sports in Canada? Is it because our national passion, hockey, is going south? Do we need a study to know the NHL is a multi-billion dollar, multinational business funded by $80 tickets, special viewing box seats and TV revenue from mass markets?

NHL owners and players are pricing hockey out of its cradle, our home, Canada.

The committee mandate, with an emphasis on hockey, will also touch on other sports, both professional and amateur, in 30 meetings and will table a report by June 1998. This is completely unrealistic, resulting in either a lightweight study having no real value or worse a request to expand the hearings tenfold. The study is either a waste of time or a blank cheque.

Why are we doing it? Donovan Bailey, Silken Lauman, Nancy Green, Kurt Browning, Sylvie Frechette and of course Paul Henderson. Need I name more? Canadians are proud of their athletes but this study will do nothing to support—

Sports
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Parkdale—High Park.

Environment
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, on October 30 I held the first of a series of pre-budget consultation meetings with the constituents of Parkdale—High Park. The message I received is that they are proud of the hard work done by the government that has resulted in today's healthy economic environment.

Canadians in my riding want the government to stay the course and continue the process of debt reduction and fiscal restraint. We are all looking forward to the elimination of the deficit during this Parliament.

My constituents have told me that we should reinvest any surplus dividend in health care, education, youth employment and the environment. As well, my constituents would like to see continuing support for small business.

It may interest my hon. colleagues across the floor to learn that we did not talk about sweeping tax cuts. Canadians, especially those in Ontario, know too well the real costs of these tax cuts borne by them in the areas of the health care system and the education of their children. They are not willing to pay this huge price for political pandering.

Veterans Affairs
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Maurice Godin Châteauguay, QC

Mr. Speaker, today the Bloc Quebecois expresses its thanks to all those who served in the army, navy, air force and merchant marine, all the nurses and all of the other men and women who risked their lives, or gave their lives, to enable us to overcome tyranny.

As the years pass, and the veterans of that time get older and pass on, each new generation has a duty to perpetuate the memory of their sacrifice and courage.

On behalf of the Bloc Quebecois, I honour the women and men who gave their lives to defend freedom and democracy during the two world wars, the Korean war and the numerous UN peacekeeping missions.

We salute you all.

Korean War Veterans
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

George Proud Hillsborough, PE

Mr. Speaker, this year's Remembrance Day poster honours our Korean War veterans. Today on the first day of Veterans Week I think it is appropriate that we pause and give some thought to the sacrifices made by these veterans.

For those who fought in it, the Korean War was as bloody and dreadful as the two world wars that preceded it. Perhaps, happening so soon after the second world war, Canadians just wanted to put the war out of their minds and so Korea has not had the same attention as other wars.

We should remember that when we joined 15 other nations to resist enemy aggression, Canada was the third largest contributor to the multinational force. In all, over 26,000 Canadians served in Korea, 1,558 became casualties, of whom 516 died.

In the Memorial Chamber in the Peace Tower hon. members will find the names of those 516 Canadians in the Korean Book of Remembrance. It is our great loss that they did not make it home. May they rest in peace.

Lest We Forget
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Lynn Myers Waterloo—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, on November 6, 1997 a resident of my riding, Margaret McKenna, will make a trip to Belgium for what is truly a sober reminder of the sacrifice made for us during World War II.

Margaret McKenna's eldest brother, Jack Summerhayes, was a gunner on a 426 squadron Halifax bomber, which was shot down on the night of May 12, 1944 over Belgium.

Thanks in part to the efforts of the Canadian and Belgian governments and the Belgium Aviation History Association, on September 6 of this year Pilot Officer Jack Summerhayes was found in a Belgian swamp still at his post. Jack Summerhayes and two other crew members also trapped in the bomber will be buried alongside the five other other crew members who perished that night in 1944.

As we approach Remembrance Day, may the pilgrimage of Margaret McKenna and the other Canadians travelling to Belgium to bury their loved ones some 53 years after their deaths serve as a statement that we as Canadians will never forget the supreme sacrifice they made.

Lieutenant Colonel Billy Barker
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Inky Mark Dauphin—Swan River, MB

Mr. Speaker, we can tell much about a country by its heroes and how it treats them.

This forgotten Canadian hero shot down 53 enemy aircraft during World War I. This forgotten Canadian hero received the Victoria Cross, the DSO, the Military Cross, the French and Italian military honours, six gallantry awards from King George V and others. Billy Bishop called him the deadliest air fighter who ever lived. This forgotten Canadian hero was the first president of the Toronto Maple Leafs and first acting director of the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Some 50,000 people joined or watched the mile long cortege at his funeral in 1930, yet his grave is marked as Smith in a family crypt with no indication of what he did for Canada.

Canada, it is time to give Lieutenant Colonel Billy Barker, VC, this Canadian hero from Dauphin, Manitoba, the recognition he deserves.

Premier Of Nova Scotia
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Joe McGuire Egmont, PE

Mr. Speaker, it is my great pleasure to congratulate the Premier of Nova Scotia, Russell MacLellan, on his election yesterday in the riding of Sydney North. Russell was the choice of his party and the people to be Premier of Nova Scotia.

Russell is an 18 year veteran of this place where he made his mark as a parliamentarian noted for his honesty and integrity, a great representative of his province and as a man of the people in all his deliberations.

We wish Russell well on his victory and that of his colleague Dr. Ed Kinley in Halifax Citadel. These victories bode well for a re-election of the Liberal government in Nova Scotia in the next few months.

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, at a Liberal fundraising dinner at $325 a plate, the Prime Minister emphasized that Ottawa would not be arriving in Kyoto empty-handed.

But what is going on, really? Canada is the only G-7 country without a specific target to propose at the Kyoto conference.

Has the Prime Minister forgotten that Canada made the commitment at the Rio Summit in 1992 to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2000? His government has, moreover, maintained that commitment, particularly by inaugurating a set of voluntary measures in 1995. The outcome: the Royal Society of Canada estimates that, by the year 2000, greenhouse gas emissions will be 9.5% over the 1990 reference level.

This wait-and-see attitude, backed up with virtually no strategy whatsoever, contradicts the Prime Minister's statement that “If we are really concerned about the next century—”

The Environment
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Vaudreuil—Soulanges.

Quebec Premier
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Nick Discepola Vaudreuil-Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, once again we have a fine example of the “Do as I say not as I do” politics of the sovereignist government of Lucien Bouchard.

This is how Le Devoir put it in its headline “Quebec City imposes its aid on Montreal”. Lucien Bouchard is very good at accusing others of meddling, but I would like to know what his government is up to if it is not meddling in the management of the City of Montreal.

His government is going back on its promise in the financial agreement and is now telling the mayor of Montreal how to manage his city. Montreal is, to all intents and purposes, under protection.

The separatists do not think this is meddling in Montreal's jurisdiction. They are calling it a partnership. I put the question again: should we not look askance at any partnership Mr. Bouchard might propose to Canada?

Environment
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Rick Casson Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, in 1966 the Liberal government rushed the sale of nuclear Candu reactors to China without following the rules laid out in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. Back then the Liberal government showed a complete lack of respect for the safety of citizens.

The Liberals have done it again. Now they are trying to push another Candu sale, this time to Turkey.

The Liberal government is kidding itself if it thinks that setting up a sham of a shallow assessment will stop the lid from blowing sky high on this issue. It is another sneaky backroom political deal.

The recent decision by Ontario Hydro to shut down seven operating reactors proves that safety concerns better be addressed before we sell these things to other countries.

To add even more insult to Canadians the Liberal government is using taxpayers' money to finance these deals. So much for the public input just mentioned on how best to spend Canadian tax dollars. The government has once again allowed a business deal to take precedence over the environment.

Contaminated Earth
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, PCB contaminated earth from Toronto is on its way to the Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean area with the permission of Lucien Bouchard's PQ government but without the permission of the people there and the people of Quebec, who were not consulted.

Fifty thousand tonnes amounts to some 2,000 trucks a year or 10 trucks arriving every work day in Saint-Ambroise with a load of contaminated earth after passing through a number of towns and villages in Quebec. The danger facing the people of Saint-Ambroise is that tomorrow it could be 100,000 tonnes of earth and 4,000 trucks a year.

It is a former minister of the environment in Ottawa who is responsible for the shipment of contaminated earth from Toronto to the Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean area without complying with the Quebec regulations on holding public hearings.