House of Commons Hansard #114 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was years.

Topics

2 p.m.

The Speaker

As is our practice on Wednesday we will now sing O Canada, and we will be led by the hon. member for Nanaimo—Cowichan.

Solicitor General
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Myron Thompson Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, we have all heard about the circle of life, well I will introduce you to the circle of patronage in the Department of the Solicitor General.

To reward his voters, the solicitor general builds a multimillion dollar research facility in his riding. Old fashioned Liberal politics at its finest. In turn, the Commissioner of Correctional Service Canada uses his facility as a meeting place for his international corrections; good for the local economy and good for the solicitor general. In return, the commissioner's reward was absolute authority. He does not have to answer to anyone.

This is where the story gets bizarre. To reward the solicitor general for staying out of his way while he paves his golden road to retirement, Ole Ingstrup has created an award in the name of the minister.

With the commissioner buttering up to the solicitor general this blatantly, we had better steel ourselves for the next bombshell to come. What could it be, a private plane for Ole? No, he has that. A driving range for inmates? No, he has that too. A boat cruise on a coast guard ship? He has done that.

Hang on taxpayers, it's going to be an expensive and dangerous summer.

Sault College And Algoma University
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Carmen Provenzano Sault Ste. Marie, ON

Mr. Speaker, our educational institutions have consistently provided Canadians with the knowledge and skills essential for success in the global economy. In Sault Ste. Marie, 35 years ago the first 80 graduates accepted their diplomas from Sault College of Applied Arts and Technology. Thirty-four years ago Algoma University was founded.

Today, Sault College offers general and expanded programs in such fields as aviation, engineering technology, health sciences and natural resources. Algoma University offers degrees in arts and science, as well as business administration and computer science.

This spring, 951 students graduated from Sault College. Algoma will grant 134 degrees to its graduating class. These are the first graduates from each of these institutions in this exciting new century. All have successfully completed another phase in their continuum of learning. May each be successful in applying their skills in the fulfilment of their aspirations. May Sault College and Algoma University survive into the next century.

Les Braves Du Coin
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Marcel Proulx Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, on May 20, the members of a Hull sports and social association, Les Braves du Coin, got together to recognize excellence in sports and in voluntarism.

Today I would like to congratulate the organizing committee of the 27th gala of excellence, under the direction of Alain Forest, as well as all the volunteers who make the evening such a great success.

Congratulations as well to all the awards winners, who included Denis Desjardins, Pierre Chartrand, Robert Chartrand, Norbert Roy and Léo Martin, and to the guest of honour, Jean Labonté, a member of the national sledge hockey team.

Since 1962, Les Braves du Coin have been involved in the Hull community, through their big provincial peewee hockey tournament and other events. Such devotion to their community would never have been possible without the devotion of the association's 450 members and the able leadership of Gilles Parent.

Congratulations to all and best wished to the Braves du Coin for a long life.

Parental Leave
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, at the last negotiations with the Government of Canada, the premier of Quebec, Lucien Bouchard, never wanted any change in parental leave available under the employment insurance program.

Only one province in Canada offers a program of preventive withdrawal from the workplace, and that is the province of Quebec. When he was a Canadian MP here in Ottawa, Lucien Bouchard never did anything about such program for expectant mothers.

Today, the Government of Canada has doubled the duration of parental leave, effective December 31, 2000, while Lucien Bouchard wants his own program, but only in the year 2002. This is a program that will $10 million to workers, $14 million to employers and $20 million to the self-employed.

The federal government has been administering parental leave for close to 30 years. Thanks to those years of experience, all of the mechanisms are in place to ensure that parents benefit from this improved federal program, starting December 31 of this year, not the year 2002.

What is essential today is that Canada and Quebec work together to find the real solution to making more resources available to mothers.

Ovarian Cancer Month
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, many of us here today have had our lives touched in some way by cancer. With Ovarian Cancer Month just over, I wish to draw the attention to this important form of cancer.

Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of death among cancers in women and causes more deaths than any other cancer of the reproductive system. It affects women of all ages, particularly those over 30.

The survival rate with early detection is 95%. Unfortunately, only one-quarter of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer are in the early stages. Most of these cancers are detected at a stage where the survival rate drops to 28%.

The survival rate of women with ovarian cancer can be improved by raising public awareness and by patient and physician education.

On their way into the Chamber, fellow members of parliament may have noticed the Ovarian Cancer Alliance of Canada information booth. Further facts on symptoms, treatments and support can be found there.

Aboriginal Affairs
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

Jim Hart Okanagan—Coquihalla, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise on behalf of the people of Okanagan—Coquihalla to inform the House that the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development is negotiating a flawed self-government treaty with the Westbank Indian Band.

The B.C. treaty commission process, though far from perfect, allows for some third party input and includes the B.C. government. These secret negotiations between the minister and the Westbank Indian Band excludes any input from the citizens of British Columbia.

The Union of British Columbia Municipalities along with concerned landowners are troubled that the federal government is negotiating a treaty in a veil of secrecy that will ultimately entrench preferential rights for certain Canadians at the expense of others. Not only that, it will arbitrarily assign resources, tax dollars and crown property to a distinct group.

Given the concern expressed in B.C. over the Nisga'a final agreement, it is essential that the remaining negotiations be opened to all concerned parties in B.C. and then be put to a British Columbia referendum.

Bromont International
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Paradis Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, when the Attractions Canada awards were given out, Bromont International won top honours in the sports event category.

I would therefore like to congratulate all those involved in organizing this equestrian competition, which has become over the years one of Quebec's most prestigious sporting events.

I want to pay tribute to the extraordinary work done by the person who might easily be called the father of these events, René Deslauriers. All of these honours are the product of 25 years of work and perseverance.

Bromont International has achieved extraordinary renown over the years. Last year alone, there were over 600 horses and riders from eight countries. Over 40,000 people attended the competitions.

This great Canadian award confirms the fact that Bromont International is a member of the very select club of exceptional events, marked by the quality of their organization.

Congratulations, again.

Canadian Heritage
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Francine Lalonde Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, we all know now that former journalist Robert-Guy Scully will have to pay the price of lost professional credibility for his conflicts of interest. As we say commonly, he was looking for it.

However, those who want to put this situation down to a quarrel in Quebec between sovereignists and federalists are really missing the point of the issue and simply repeating the spin put on it by National Public Relations Inc.

What this unfortunate story reveals is the scope of the federal government's propaganda operation, which goes so far as to make use of a few of its rich Liberal friends as figureheads in order to whitewash and hide its budget.

Let us not forget Option Canada and the Council for Canadian Unity. When the Minister of Canadian Heritage tells us that she will be delighted to display the maple leaf when her department spends more millions of dollars in “federal communications” operations, we do not believe it for a minute. Secrecy and concealment are key elements of the success of propaganda.

Parental Leave
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are proud of the national program for maternity and parental leave.

This program has demonstrated its value for 30 years and is now in the process of being enhanced. The revised program will be ready this year. Indeed, as early as at the end of the year 2000, parents will receive a bigger cheque and, more importantly, lower income families will be eligible for a supplement under that program.

We invite the Quebec government to build on the national foundations to provide an even better program if it so wishes.

National Parks
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, Kejimkujik National Park is the most heavily infested gypsy moth area in Nova Scotia. The moth destroys our forests because it is not native to North America and has no natural predators. The spread of this insect threatens the forest industry.

The federal government has a mandate for forest health and the responsibility to act but is lacking the will. The root of the problem appears to be a philosophical resistance to the control of an introduced pest in a national park.

One observer, who has managed local gypsy moth control measures, told me that if he had the federal money to eradicate this moth that has been spent on travelling around to study the problem, there would not be a problem.

The province is taking firm control measures for the brown spruce longhorn beetle in Point Pleasant Park in Halifax. When is the federal government going to do the same thing to control the gypsy moth in the national park?

Quebec Premier
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Claude Drouin Beauce, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is not only as the member for Beauce, but also as the president of the Quebec Liberal caucus and on behalf of its members that I condemn the offensive remarks made yesterday by Quebec Premier Lucien Bouchard on the Right Hon. Prime Minister of Canada.

In a democracy, it is normal to have disagreements, but it is unacceptable to have a head of government make such low personal attacks as those made yesterday by Premier Lucien Bouchard.

For the quality of the public debate, and considering the example parliamentarians are expected to set for the public and for young people in particular, Premier Lucien Bouchard must apologize and withdraw his remarks.

Health
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, today is the National Day of warning for Medicare. Thank goodness frontline health care workers are sounding the alarm bell, because our health minister sure is not. All we get are empty words and flowery speeches.

In speeches, the minister says he will come up with cash. In reality, there is $24.7 billion less.

In speeches, the minister says he hates for profit hospitals. In reality, he allows them.

In speeches, he promises action on reproductive technology. In reality, 10 years after the royal commission, there is still no legislation.

In speeches, he boosts about health safety. In reality, the health protection branch is gutted.

In speeches, he cares about drug prices. In reality, there is no action on patents.

In speeches, he drips sincerity about hepatitis C victims. In reality, it has been two years and three months and not a penny paid.

No wonder the finance minister and provinces are not listening to the minister. Maybe words are not what we need. How about some action?

Parental Leave
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont, QC

Mr. Speaker, while the Government of Quebec is offering young Quebec families flexible parental leave suited to their needs, the Prime Minister continues to live in the past and reject the National Assembly's unanimous call for greater flexibility and openness with respect to the needs of Quebec families and Quebec's jurisdiction over family policy.

Instead of applauding the originality and the necessary generosity of Quebec's parental insurance plan, the Prime Minister has once again preferred to adopt the confrontational attitude of a reactionary and run the risk of derailing a plan that meets with the solid support of Quebecers.

If the Prime Minister refuses to listen to the repeated requests from the National Assembly, the Bloc Quebecois and the Quebec people, could he at least listen to his Liberal organizers in Quebec who are calling on him to reverse steam and bow to the legitimate requests of the Government of Quebec?

Hull Human Resources Centre
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle, QC

Mr. Speaker, it was with great pleasure that I and the member for Hull—Aylmer took part in this morning's official ISO 9002 certification ceremony for the Human Resources Centre of Canada in Hull.

This centre is part of a very select group, for there are only three other ISO 9002 certified centres in Canada, one of them being the Laval human resources centre.

This ISO 9002 certification points up the exceptional work being done by the employees of the Hull human resources centre under the direction of Bertrand Duclos.

On behalf of the House and all my constituents who benefit from the excellent service being provided by the devoted staff of the Hull human resources centre, I extend our sincere congratulations and thanks for a job well done, something which too often goes unnoticed.